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Jimmy Hayes passes away

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4 minutes ago, Alflives said:

Does this mean he was an addict?

Looks like he may have been an addict to pain meds. Who knows if this was a recreational drug use thing or if he was addicted to this as well. Regardless, I still believe it was a selfish thing considering he had a wife, 2 year old and a baby. Everyone by now knows that using cocaine/fentanyl can kill you.

Edited by grandmaster
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4 minutes ago, grandmaster said:

What an awful thing to do to your family. I feel so sad for them. 

I mean, yes. But Jimmy's also a victim in this too. The pull of addiction is incredibly powerful, even when one rationally knows it's a poor decision. 

 

Addiction is a complex, multifaceted thing, most people don't plan on becoming addicts and it's not as simple a thing to escape from as some folks would like to believe. Having millions of dollars, supports, and resources don't guarantee one's success, in fact most addicts relapse. 

 

I understand what you mean, but the addict brain is something else and it's incredibly common for one's addiction to become the most important thing in a person's life. It's tragic that his painkiller use took him down this path, and resulted in a family left behind, but it's a very common and depressing reality for many. 

 

This isn't a confrontational response on my part, it's just a lot more complex than choosing to leave your family behind. 

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15 minutes ago, grandmaster said:

Looks like he may have been an addict to pain meds. Who knows if this was a recreational drug use thing or if he was addicted to this as well. Regardless, I still believe it was a selfish thing considering he had a wife, 2 year old and a baby. Everyone by now knows that using cocaine/fentanyl can kill you.

The person who dies is dead.  The pain and suffering is left for those who loved them to experience.  Drugs are evil.  Seeing a young guy with so much to live for choose drugs shows how addiction consumes a person.  Sadly he just couldn’t stop.  

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11 minutes ago, Coconuts said:

I mean, yes. But Jimmy's also a victim in this too. The pull of addiction is incredibly powerful, even when one rationally knows it's a poor decision. 

 

Addiction is a complex, multifaceted thing, most people don't plan on becoming addicts and it's not as simple a thing to escape from as some folks would like to believe. Having millions of dollars, supports, and resources don't guarantee one's success, in fact most addicts relapse. 

 

I understand what you mean, but the addict brain is something else and it's incredibly common for one's addiction to become the most important thing in a person's life. It's tragic that his painkiller use took him down this path, and resulted in a family left behind, but it's a very common and depressing reality for many. 

 

This isn't a confrontational response on my part, it's just a lot more complex than choosing to leave your family behind. 

Agreed. Also, part of the equation is the want to stop aspect. You can throw a ton of support, programs and rehab but in the end the user must want to stop. There are plenty of those that simply don’t want to. 

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1 minute ago, grandmaster said:

Agreed. Also, part of the equation is the want to stop aspect. You can throw a ton of support, programs and rehab but in the end the user must want to stop. There are plenty of those that simply don’t want to. 

I’m wondering if, like many athletes, his addiction began with prescribed medication from team physicians?  

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2 hours ago, grandmaster said:

Looks like he may have been an addict to pain meds. Who knows if this was a recreational drug use thing or if he was addicted to this as well. Regardless, I still believe it was a selfish thing considering he had a wife, 2 year old and a baby. Everyone by now knows that using cocaine/fentanyl can kill you.

Sometimes users are not aware that fentanyl is mixed in.

Also most of the time fentanyl is added to heroin not to cocaine.

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4 hours ago, CBH1926 said:

Not necessarily, they said that they found fentanyl and cocaine in his system.

Since typically fentanyl is not mixed in cocaine, it’s possible that he took it inadvertently.

 

He had cocaine and fentanyl in his system.

 

https://ca.sports.yahoo.com/news/late-nhler-jimmy-hayes-died-with-fentanyl-and-cocaine-in-his-system-000800836.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAB_AIoj56Z84ftj0AoFQES8_YijBRMVZqWtd0-My6X7epHDvA93erTyZNROF7CIOe6UPERCjxsDdhBRfQz88GKkkPT9SBkFqXazZBy2LgS1eYtlZRhLGgdxQrSQk2UYdsqjhjRjv7CgZmgbTC6xWpuo6SS0OgQXL6nNMwIWisfj_

 

Quote

A toxicology report revealed that former NHLer Jimmy Hayes had fentanyl and cocaine in his system at the time of his death, Hayes's family told Dan Shaughnessy of The Boston Globe.

The 31-year-old Hayes was found dead on Aug. 23, just hours after celebrating the birthday of his two-year-old son. His wife and father spoke to the Globe on Sunday, two days after receiving the report that revealed his cause of death.

Hayes's wife, Kristen, told Shaughnessy that she was shocked to learn the news, although she and many of his friends knew the former winger had developed a pill issue during his NHL career and had recently undergone treatment for addiction problems.

“I was completely shocked,’’ Kristen told the Globe. “I was so certain that it had nothing to do with drugs. I really thought it was a heart attack or anything that wasn’t that [drugs]. ... He never showed any signs of a struggle at home.’’

Shaughnessy reports that Jimmy's dad, Kevin Hayes, wasn't as surprised as most. Himself an addict, Kevin says he noticed something was off with his oldest son over a year before his passing.

Now, he hopes that telling his story will prevent it from happening to other athletes.

“He called me ... and said, ‘Dad, I’m hooked on these pills. I got injured and I started taking them and I never got off,’" Kevin Hayes told the Globe. "And I said, ‘Well, let’s get you some help.’ He went to a place up in Haverhill. So he gets help and everything was on the path to recovery, I thought. But this [expletive] is so powerful.’’

Jimmy's brother, Kevin Hayes Jr., is a forward with the Philadelphia Flyers. After taking some time to mourn his brother's death, Kevin Jr. released a powerful statement, reflecting on what the tragic death meant to him.

"I lost my best friend and my brother. [Kristen] lost her husband and her father to her kids," Kevin Jr. said.

 

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56 minutes ago, -DLC- said:

It's not even that simple.

 

When your body is addicted to a substance withdrawal is very real and incredibly difficult.  Your body screams for the drug and if it's readily available, it's a vicious cycle.  Trying to quit isn't as simple as it sounds.

 

I don't think any one "wants" to be addicted but it gets a strangehold on people.

Never said it was easy. Nothing in life is easy. Most folks need to work hard to get through life. Getting off substance addictions is not just hard work but painful. I totally get that.

 

I disagree with you on the last part of your comment. There are many folks who are addicted to things and do not want to stop. I’ve seen in my family and at work. Regardless of the pain and suffering that their addictions cause to others, they don’t care and they don’t want to stop.

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1 hour ago, -DLC- said:

I wish we'd stop judging people who die of drugs because,  yes, initially it's a choice but it's something that grabs a hold of you and you lose yourself.

 

I have a lot of first hand experience with this topic and these people don't intentionally set out to hurt those they love.  They don't even love themselves at the point of no return.  It's tragic and it doesn't mean they were bad people who didn't care about those who loved them.  

You admit that it is initially a choice. A choice that people know lead to addictions and death yet you excuse it. Yes it is tragic but their addictions in fact do cause pain and suffering to others as well, mostly to their own loved ones. In this case, I would say it was bad to the poor kids who will now grow up without a dad and a wife who has to raise them with out a husband. 
 

I feel for your first hand experiences. I’ve had plenty myself. 

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8 hours ago, grandmaster said:

Looks like he may have been an addict to pain meds. Who knows if this was a recreational drug use thing or if he was addicted to this as well. Regardless, I still believe it was a selfish thing considering he had a wife, 2 year old and a baby. Everyone by now knows that using cocaine/fentanyl can kill you.

If he was addicted, that's an awful thing to say. I don't know the whole story but if he was addicted to pain medications perhaps it's having to go through the 82 game schedule a player has to endure. There was a recent documentary on this was there not? 

 

Also if he was addicted I think calling him selfish is a pretty close minded thing to say. Addiction is a disease and a sickness and calling someone selfish for having a sickness or addiction. People don't call people being selfish because they got sick of something do they? Addiction should be treated in the same or similar light. It's a pretty ignorant thing to say especially in what we know now. 

Edited by iinatcc
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7 hours ago, iinatcc said:

If he was addicted, that's an awful thing to say. I don't know the whole story but if he was addicted to pain medications perhaps it's having to go through the 82 game schedule a player has to endure. There was a recent documentary on this was there not? 

 

Also if he was addicted I think calling him selfish is a pretty close minded thing to say. Addiction is a disease and a sickness and calling someone selfish for having a sickness or addiction. People don't call people being selfish because they got sick of something do they? Addiction should be treated in the same or similar light. It's a pretty ignorant thing to say especially in what we know now. 

If he was an addict and not a recreational user then it’s a bit more sad but I still hold some of my opinion, just to a lesser degree. It all began with a choice. No one put a gun to their heads to use. The government, schools and most of our parents have done a bang up job on on the dangers of drugs since we were little kids. This was never a secret.
 

Also, don’t preach and call others ignorant on this topic when you have no idea what I have endured. Like I’ve said, I have addiction in my family. My brother is a drug addict and my dad was an alcoholic before he died. The selfish aspect is not caring how their behaviour hurt those close to them. In this case he ultimately robbed his little kids of a dad and a wife of a husband. I feel for the them a lot more.

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5 hours ago, grandmaster said:

If he was an addict and not a recreational user then it’s a bit more sad but I still hold some of my opinion, just to a lesser degree. It all began with a choice. No one put a gun to their heads to use. The government, schools and most of our parents have done a bang up job on on the dangers of drugs since we were little kids. This was never a secret.
 

Also, don’t preach and call others ignorant on this topic when you have no idea what I have endured. Like I’ve said, I have addiction in my family. My brother is a drug addict and my dad was an alcoholic before he died. The selfish aspect is not caring how their behaviour hurt those close to them. In this case he ultimately robbed his little kids of a dad and a wife of a husband. I feel for the them a lot more.

Sorry to hear about your experience. That said I still don't see how can anyone suffering from addiction should be considered selfish no one intends to get addicted circumstances play out that get people addicted, as such it should be treated as a sickness and not some sort of judgment on someone's character. The last thing we need is trying to find ways in vilifying these people, I was taught at a pretty young age at how "all drug users are bad people" and I now am quite upset I was taught to think that way instead of seeing their issue as a mental disease.

 

 

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On 10/18/2021 at 1:09 PM, iinatcc said:

Sorry to hear about your experience. That said I still don't see how can anyone suffering from addiction should be considered selfish no one intends to get addicted circumstances play out that get people addicted, as such it should be treated as a sickness and not some sort of judgment on someone's character. The last thing we need is trying to find ways in vilifying these people, I was taught at a pretty young age at how "all drug users are bad people" and I now am quite upset I was taught to think that way instead of seeing their issue as a mental disease.

 

 

 

A very well-written story about Colin Wilson and his battle with addiction. Interesting that Ambien was one of his earliest addictions but he doesn’t mention if it came from the team/doctor/trainer.

 

 

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