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WilliG

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Personally, I don't have much to say in this as I don't really know where this conversation's supposed to go?

 

However, having graduated from computer science and indirectly being in the field of AG technologies at the moment, while I don't feel like I have much of an opinion at this point (I'm just a backend developer), I will say that a lot of the technologies right now are more to assist farmers than anything else. I don't see technology as necessarily to replace workers (albeit there is the possibilitiy of the odd farmhand not being needed)/

Edited by The Lock
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1 hour ago, The Lock said:

Personally, I don't have much to say in this as I don't really know where this conversation's supposed to go?

 

However, having graduated from computer science and indirectly being in the field of AG technologies at the moment, while I don't feel like I have much of an opinion at this point (I'm just a backend developer), I will say that a lot of the technologies right now are more to assist farmers than anything else. I don't see technology as necessarily to replace workers (albeit there is the possibilitiy of the odd farmhand not being needed)/

John Deere is putting 60 something +/- 400 hp tractors in fields this spring that have no operators in the cab. Combines aren't far away.

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3 minutes ago, Boudrias said:

John Deere is putting 60 something +/- 400 hp tractors in fields this spring that have no operators in the cab. Combines aren't far away.

But there's still a farmer that needs to be out there. Just because there's no one in the cab, doesn't mean it's a field without anyone. There's also the matter of managing the field.

 

It's easy to point at technology and become scared of it, but it's also important to look at what would be changing along with it.

 

(Edited: I had a werid typo stating "funny" in there for whatever reason)

Edited by The Lock
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2 hours ago, The Lock said:

But there's still a farmer that needs to be out there. Just because there's no one in the cab, doesn't mean it's a field without anyone. There's also the matter of managing the field.

 

It's easy to point at technology and become scared of it, but it's also important to look at what would be changing along with it.

 

(Edited: I had a werid typo stating "funny" in there for whatever reason)

True enough. I watch quite a bit of Agricultue Report. The idea behind automated equipment is the farm labour shortage, accuracy, the flexibility it gives for faster harvesting, and reduced human error. The monitors they ar3 putting into seed drills and fertilizer applicators are amazing. The payback is quick.

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5 hours ago, luckyjack said:

It's profitable field for investing for sure. I read about Earth observing system that helps farmers remotely assess the health of their crops, cut costs on scouting, soil testing, and farm management, and use seeds and fertilizers more efficiently.

I don’t have any ‘mud on the boots’ experience anymore. I’m so old that I remember when banding fertilizers was considered ground breaking, My background was selling inputs to farmers. Back in the ‘70’s I started selling chemicals with weed herbicide in wheat. The product was Shell Matevan. Sold some to a farm account and when I checked on results the old farmer said he was happy with his test on the wheat. Then he leans over and tells me it is no good on peas. Harry, I says it isn’t made for weeds in peas. Good, he says, because it killed the peas. Yikes! 

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