Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

Ripudaman Singh Malik, Acquited in Air India Bombings, Shot Dead in Surrey, Update: Suspects Caught


DonLever

Recommended Posts

Ripudaman Singh Malik, acquitted in Air India bombings, shot dead in Surrey, B.C. (msn.com)

 

Ripudaman Singh Malik, one of two men acquitted in the 1985 Air India terrorist bombings, has been shot to death in Surrey, B.C.

A witness in the 8200-block of 128 Street told CBC he heard three shots and that Malik was hit in the neck. A second witness from a nearby business confirmed Malik's identity.

Surrey RCMP said a man was shot at that location at around 9:30 a.m. PT and succumbed to his injuries at the scene. They say it appears to be a targeted shooting and are not releasing the victim's name.

A suspect vehicle was located in the 12200-block of 82 Avenue engulfed in fire, according to police.

Malik, who was in his mid-70s, owned a business in the area.

 

Malik and co-accused Ajaib Singh Bagri were acquitted in 2005 of mass murder and conspiracy charges related to a pair of bombings in 1985 that killed 331 people, mostly from the Toronto and Vancouver areas.

Of those who died, 329 were aboard Air India Flight 182 when it exploded in mid-air over the Atlantic Ocean on June 23, 1985. Another bomb destined for a separate flight exploded at a Tokyo airport, killing two baggage handlers.

 

The killings amounted to the worst mass murder in Canadian history. Among the dead were 280 Canadians and 86 children.

 

Malik, a successful businessman with significant influence among Canadian Sikhs, sued after his acquittal in an effort to get back $9.2 million in legal fees. He claimed the Crown knew the case fell short of standards, but turned a blind eye and pursued the case regardless under pressure from the public.

A B.C. Supreme Court judge rejected Malik's financial claim in July 2012. 

In recent years, Malik served as chairman with Khalsa School and managed two of the private schools' campuses in Surrey and Vancouver. He was also president of the Vancouver-based Khalsa Credit Union (KCU), which has more than 16,000 members.

Only one man was convicted in relation to the 1985 bombings. Inderjit Singh Reyat served 30 years for lying during two trials, including Malik's, and for helping to make the bombs at his home in Duncan, B.C.

Crown lawyers alleged the bombing was a terrorist attack against state-owned Air India, an act of revenge by B.C.-based Sikh extremists against the Indian government for ordering the army to raid Sikhism's holiest shrine, the Golden Temple in Amritsar, in June 1984.

Malik, then 58, and Bagri, then 55, were acquitted after a highly publicized trial that stretched on for two years.

In the end, Justice Ian Josephson found the Crown's key witnesses, who testified that they heard the two defendants confess, were biased and unreliable. 

 

Edited by DonLever
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Alflives said:

Other than his connection to the terrorist bombing of the plane was there any other reason for this man to be targeted for murder?  Or is it likely revenge, just took a long time to get him?  

Someone’s bottled up emotions and desires of vengeance probably reached a breaking point. 

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

There are other possibilities - as a businessman, he may have pissed off the wrong crowd and crossed someone in a business dealing that he shouldn't have; as a person of influence, he may have been involved in the gang warfare happening in the Lower Mainland or lost his influence with the more militant wing of his peoples.  It's all speculation (even the revenge-for-bombing theory) until someone with knowledge of what happens speaks the truth.

I don’t at all know what’s going on in this situation, but it comes across as very cowardly to murder some very old man.  Hope our police catch the young coward (regardless of his reasons) who did this.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inderjit Singh Reyat was the only one convicted. I was working at Woolworths in Duncan at the time in the stereo/record department.

I remember him coming in and wanting to get the receipt of the stereo component he bought (wonder why).

My boss at the time had to testify in the trial. He also went into Radio Shack wanting receipts for things he used to make the bomb apparently. The fellow who worked there also had to testify.

My Dad knew him as they worked at different trucking companies. He said he was the last person you would ever expect to be a terrorist which goes to show you that one never knows what is going on in someone else's mind.

  • Thanks 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Alflives said:

I don’t at all know what’s going on in this situation, but it comes across as very cowardly to murder some very old man.  Hope our police catch the young coward (regardless of his reasons) who did this.  


I get what you’re trying to say here Alf and while murder of anyone is cowardly and revolting it’s also important to remember bad people grow old. Nazis age too. Just because someone’s old doesn’t mean they’re absolved of any crimes or atrocities they committed earlier in life. Now before anyone gets the wrong idea I’m commenting in general, not at all about this specific situation of which, like you, I do not know of. I also hope the murderer is caught by police.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Alflives said:

I don’t at all know what’s going on in this situation, but it comes across as very cowardly to murder some very old man.  Hope our police catch the young coward (regardless of his reasons) who did this.  

I wonder if the 300+ persons who died on the Air India feel the same way as you do.   Just because the prosecution did not prove its case against Ripudaman does not mean he did not have a role in the bombing.    People familar with the case believe had a role in the bombing.   The judge acquited him because he believe the witnesses was not crediible.  Perhap a jury might have found different.   The coward is not the killer of Ripudaman but the terrorists who did the Air Canada bombing.

  • Cheers 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, DonLever said:

I wonder if the 300+ persons who died on the Air India feel the same way as you do.   Just because the prosecution did not prove its case against Ripudaman does not mean he did not have a role in the bombing.    People familar with the case believe had a role in the bombing.   The judge acquited him because he believe the witnesses was not crediible.  Perhap a jury might have found different.   The coward is not the killer of Ripudaman but the terrorists who did the Air Canada bombing.

Of course the terrorists who bombed the plane were cowards.  100% agree.  But the person who sneaked up this old man and shot him acted cowardly too.  Clearly it’s not a brave act to shoot an unarmed old man.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, NewbieCanuckFan said:

I really don’t have any sympathy for mass murderers regardless of how old they are.  Thing is, that guy was found not guilty.

Found not guilty does not mean he is innocent.   People are sometimes found not guilty for various reasons even though they committed the crime.

  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My speculation...

 

Large #'s of those who arrived after the Golden temple butchery? A horrible act, many fought, fled, and wanted independence in India's NW as a result. Some before. Were involved in clandestine businesses here in BC. Raised & sent money home to fight & advance their cause. Violence breeds violence. Its my understanding their kids take over the illegal businesses; Indo Canadian gangs have been a problem almost since.

 

But once involved in illegal business, if not always involved?  It still has a way of catching up with you.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Canuck Surfer said:

My speculation...

 

Large #'s of those who arrived after the Golden temple butchery? A horrible act, many fought, fled, and wanted independence in India's NW as a result. Some before. Were involved in clandestine businesses here in BC. Raised & sent money home to fight & advance their cause. Violence breeds violence. Its my understanding their kids take over the illegal businesses; Indo Canadian gangs have been a problem almost since.

 

But once involved in illegal business, if not always involved?  It still has a way of catching up with you.  

Karma….I believe some concepts of that are in the Sikh religion (as well as in other religions), but I’m no expert.

Edited by NewbieCanuckFan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/14/2022 at 7:15 PM, Alflives said:

Of course the terrorists who bombed the plane were cowards.  100% agree.  But the person who sneaked up this old man and shot him acted cowardly too.  Clearly it’s not a brave act to shoot an unarmed old man.  

Shooting an unarmed old man is a cowardly act, but only if that man is innocent.

If you are involved in mass murder of civilians, to me it makes no difference if you are 20 or 90.

Once you take an innocent life, you have forfeited your right to live.

 

 

Edited by CBH1926
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Acquitted due to lack of evidence.  CSIS mishandling, wire-taps deleted.  Witnesses murdered.  The convicted “bomb maker” reneged on a plea deal to testify.   Definitely not an “innocent bystander” 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...