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Fiona's trajectory, power and precipitation — illustrated in graphics (msn.com)

 

Fiona's trajectory, power and precipitation — illustrated in graphics

Hundreds of thousands of people in the Maritimes remained without power Sunday following post-tropical storm Fiona, which brought fierce gusts of wind, heavy rain and serious infrastructure damage across Atlantic Canada. 

This photo provided by Pauline Billard shows destruction caused by post-tropical storm Fiona in Rose Blanche, 45 kilometres east of Port aux Basques, N.L., on Saturday.
This photo provided by Pauline Billard shows destruction caused by post-tropical storm Fiona in Rose Blanche, 45 kilometres east of Port aux Basques, N.L., on Saturday.© Pauline Billard via The Associated Press

After surging north from the Caribbean, Fiona came ashore before dawn Saturday as a post-tropical cyclone, battering Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Quebec with hurricane-strength winds, heavy rains and huge waves.

 

Defence Minister Anita Anand said troops would help remove fallen trees throughout Eastern Canada, restore transportation links and do whatever else is required for as long as it takes. She didn't specify how many troops would be deployed.

Fiona was blamed for at least five deaths in the Caribbean. There was at least one confirmed death in Canada, a 73-year-old woman who was washed out of her home in Port aux Basques, N.L., one of the hardest-hit areas.

These graphics show: Fiona's path into Canada and how it compared with other recent storms; areas in the Maritimes with the highest levels of rainfall; and the parts of Atlantic Canada with the strongest wind gusts.

How Hurricane Fiona's path compares with other storms

As of Sunday morning, more than 256,000 Nova Scotia Power customers and over 82,000 Maritime Electric customers in Prince Edward Island — about 95 per cent of the total — remained in the dark. So were more than 20,600 homes and businesses in New Brunswick.

More than 415,000 Nova Scotia Power customers — about 80 per cent of the province — had been affected by outages Saturday. Utility companies say it could be days before the lights are back on for everyone.w on Watch 

 

Rain

The Canadian Hurricane Centre tweeted that Fiona had the lowest pressure — a key sign of storm strength — ever recorded for a storm making landfall in Canada.

The storm brought nearly 200 millimetres of rain to parts of Nova Scotia and up to 150 mm in parts of New Brunswick, according to Environment Canada.

Charlottetown, the capital of P.E.I., faced 80 millimetres of rain and  Wreckhouse, N.L. was hit by 77.2 mm.  

How much rain Fiona brought to Nova Scotia

 

Wind

Fierce winds caused much of the damage brought on by the storm, including downed power lines and trees.

In Nova Scotia, Peter MacKay, a former foreign and defence minister, said he had never seen anything to match Fiona, with winds raging through the night and into the afternoon.

"We had put everything we could out of harm's way, but the house got hammered pretty hard. Lost lots of shingles, heavy water damage in ceilings, walls, our deck is destroyed. A garage that I was building blew away," MacKay said in an email to The Associated Press.

How much wind Fiona brought to Nova Scotia

In Newfoundland and Labrador, winds whipped up to 177 km/h in Green Island and 134 km/h in Port aux Basques, a community devastated by Fiona.

In New Brunswick, Moncton faced top wind speeds of 100 km/h followed by St. John with 86 km/h. On Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown faced gusts of 130 km/h and Arisaig, N.S., saw winds of up to 171 km/h.

Places in Atlantic Canada hardest hit by Fiona's whipping winds

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GARRIOCH: Hurricane Fiona's impact is felt in Ottawa Senators' dressing room (msn.com)

GARRIOCH: Hurricane Fiona's impact is felt in Ottawa Senators' dressing room

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The photos and the videos of the damage to the Atlantic provinces from Hurricane Fiona have hit close to home in the Ottawa Senators’ dressing room.

Files: Senators right-winger Drake Batherson
Files: Senators right-winger Drake Batherson© Errol McGihon

While troops from Canada’s armed forces were being sent to the East Coast to help with the cleanup and the recovery, there are many ties to the area in the Sens organization. Many have spent a lot of time on phone with family or friends making sure everybody is okay.

 

One of the hardest hit areas was Channel-Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland where a state of emergency was declared after homes along the coast line were swept into the ocean. Among those who lost their dwelling were winger Drake Batherson’s great aunt and uncle.

Batherson’s parents, Norm and Deeann, make their home in the Annapolis Valley in Nova Scotia, but his mother’s aunt and uncle weren’t as fortunate. They were able to grab their pets and get out of the house in time as their lifetime of memories washed away.

 

“My family in Port-Aux-Basque got hit hard,” Batherson told this newspaper Sunday. “My great aunt and uncle lost their house into the ocean. My thoughts and prayers are with my family in Port-Aux-Basque and everybody in that town and all my family across Newfoundland.

 

 

People look at their damaged home after the arrival of Hurricane Fiona in Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland, Canada September 25, 2022.
People look at their damaged home after the arrival of Hurricane Fiona in Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland, Canada September 25, 2022.© JOHN MORRIS

“I used to go there as a kid with my grandfather salmon fishing so I’m very familiar with the spot.”

Batherson said the couple is fortunate it has a lot of family in the area but that doesn’t make what happened to them any easier. He had stayed in touch with his parents Saturday before facing the Toronto Maple Leafs at Scotiabank Arena, because Nova Scotia was also hit hard by the storm.

“I heard the news before the game and I just felt terrible,” Batherson said. “I’ve seen a lot of the videos from the area and it’s really tough to watch. The houses in Port-Aux-Basque have probably been there for over a hundred years and I recognize some of the areas that got hit from being there as a kid.

 

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