Jump to content
The Official Site of the Vancouver Canucks
Canucks Community

Tim Hortons at 3433 North Road in Burnaby: Interwest Restaurants trespassing multiple customers after complaints to Fraser Health; inspection reveals poor sanitation


Nucklehead22

Recommended Posts

The quiet city of Burnaby, British Columbia, has recently been abuzz with the story of Cindy Hicks, a woman claiming to be homeless and spending most of her days and nights in a local Tim Horton’s. Her story has drawn a significant amount of attention and sympathy from the public. However, after a thorough investigation into Hicks’ background, it has been revealed that there’s far more to Cindy Hicks story than meets the eye...

 

It all started when Hicks was evicted from the Hillside Place Housing Co-operative, which later filed a lawsuit against her (that can be seen here: https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcsc/doc/2013/2013bcsc242/2013bcsc242.pdf), casting doubt on her credibility and exposing her as a potential scammer.

 

Until 2012, Hicks was a resident of Hillside Place, a housing co-operative that prides itself on providing affordable and secure housing to its members. Co-operatives are unique in that they require their members to actively participate in the management and upkeep of the property. In exchange, members benefit from affordable rent and a sense of community. Unfortunately, it seems that Hicks failed to uphold her end of the bargain. In 2012, after accumulating a significant amount of unpaid rent and other co-op fees, she was served an eviction notice. Hillside attempted to compromise with Hicks, even allowing her to pay her appears at just $25/month, but incurred other debt owing to the company in the interim and failed to pay it off. Despite being given ample time to vacate, Hicks refused to leave, forcing the co-operative to take legal action. Hillside Place filed a lawsuit against Hicks, and the court ruled in favour of the co-operative, mandating her eviction as well as awarding Hillside Place additional monetary damages, including legal fees.

 

Leonard Haggstrom, a former board member at Hillside, was a staunch supporter of Hicks for a long time, helping her through the lawsuit and even submitting filings on her behalf — never once charging her a dime. To repay him for his hard work, Haggstrom says Hicks failed to show up for court hearings. According to court documents, "Evidence on this application clearly shows that Ms. Hicks was served with notice of the application, originally set for an earlier date, and that the matter was adjourned to August 22 at the request of a lawyer Ms. Hicks had consulted. Ms. Hicks knew or ought to have known of the hearing and its potential consequences. She has provided no satisfactory explanation for her non-appearance."  Haggstrom adds that after Hicks did finally vacate, he “never heard from her again,” leaving him feeling used. In addition to court ruling against Hicks, Haggstrom was also ordered to pay "special costs" to Hillside. "Cindy ruined my life - much like everyone else she encounters," says Haggstrom.

 

Now, for the past 6 years, Cindy Hicks has been able to maintain her well-rehearsed ruse to unsuspecting customers of a Burnaby Tim Horton’s (located at 3433 North Road), and has sought to capitalize on the kindness of the Burnaby community. Her story was one that stirred the hearts of many, and her apparent plight led to an outpouring of support from local residents, many of whom offered her food, clothing, and even temporary shelter. However, the revelation of her prior eviction and the subsequent lawsuit has left many in the community feeling deceived and betrayed. As the truth has now come to light, it has become increasingly clear that Hicks has a history of attempting to manipulate and exploit others for her own gain, and twist situations for her own advantage.

 

It is also worth noting that despite her claims, Hicks is, in fact, not truly homeless. Customers and former friends of Hicks, dating back to the Boone County Country Cabaret days, say Hicks has a home that she goes to every night as well as some afternoons, and that they don’t understand why she’s keeping up the charade, other than to say that there must be some kind of mental illness behind it — although not outwardly so.

 

One older couple, who regularly visited with Hicks at the Tim Hortons, say Hicks contacted them by telephone after disappearing for over a year to let them know where she’s at. “She called us from someone else’s phone. We know something wasn’t adding up with her story when she contacted us by telephone out of the blue,” — something they say Hicks would never do.

 

"Unfortunately she’s got a lot of people fooled. It actually blows my mind just how many people have managed to fall for her tricks.” says another community member who visits the Tim Hortons once or twice per month and happens to be acquainted with individuals who know Hicks personally. Adding, “She’s had years of practice.”

Hicks’ own children, Roy and Helena Asselstine, also spoke to us exclusively and say they’ve long-ago distanced themselves from their mother. The siblings share harrowing accounts of the abuse they endured under her care, painting a grim picture of a childhood marred by suffering and turmoil at the hands of the very person who was supposed to protect them. “It was a constant struggle, a never-ending nightmare. She would belittle us, manipulate our emotions, and use any opportunity to inflict pain,” Roy recalls. Helena echoed her brother’s sentiments, tearfully sharing, “She made our lives a living hell. We tried to escape her clutches countless times, but she always managed to drag us back into her toxic world.”

 

The siblings’ harrowing accounts of their upbringing have left many in the community struggling to reconcile the friendly face they’ve come to know at the Burnaby coffee shop with the cruel and abusive parent described by Roy and Helena, as some are now realizing there may be far more to Cindy Hicks story than meets the eye.

 

Marelle Reid, a former reporter for the Burnaby Now who featured Hicks in an article about her eviction from Hillside, also touched upon the recent events, saying, "It will almost certainly take a crisis that involves a trip by ambulance to have her seen to."

 

The story of Cindy Hicks is a cautionary tale that reminds us to be vigilant and discerning when confronted with tales of hardship. While it is important to extend empathy and support to those in need, we must also be mindful that there are individuals who may seek to exploit the goodwill of others for their own benefit.

 

In the wake of these revelations, many are also calling for greater scrutiny and accountability for those claiming to be homeless, while also urging for continued support for legitimate cases of hardship. The story of Cindy Hicks has undoubtedly left a mark on the Burnaby community, but it is the hope of many that this incident will serve as a catalyst for a renewed commitment to genuine compassion and assistance for those who truly need it.

 

https://bbybulletin.ca/f/unmasking-the-enigma-of-cindy-hicks-the-charming-tim-hortons-reg

Edited by Nucklehead22
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a LOT of empathy for the homeless/mentally ill, a LOT - but I also want myself and my family to be safe in my own community.

There has to be a compromise that benefits both the community at large and the homeless population that respects them as humans and acknowledges they need certain supports, but at the same time - addresses the elephant in the room so to speak in that this cannot be allowed to continue let alone escalate. 

What it is, I don't know - but that's the job of community experts and that's why they're in their respective positions - so far I don't see much progress sadly.   

  • Like 1
  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can not help people who refuse to accept help or change.

 

Unfortunately the calls to reopen places like Riverview are growing louder and this leads us down a road towards the return of forced institutionalization.

 

For those of you who don't know what that means, it is a simple thing in which people deemed unfit to exist in the real world due to mental health and addiction issues or mental health issues caused by addiction who refuse to go to or accept treatment would be forced in to institutions for around the clock care as they are a danger to themselves and society.

 

Why this is an issue, regardless of how altruistic the motives are is that it inevitably devolves in to abuse and neglect as these people will also fight and refuse treatment in these centres.  Staff will grow overworked and callous and eventually the abuse will start, moderate at first then systemic towards the end.

 

Without that intervention, this problem will only grow due to the factors contributing to addiction and mental health.  But warehousing people against their will for their own safety is not a solution; it is only hiding the problem.  

 

We need a reset from the top down to fix the issues causing this.

  • Cheers 1
  • Upvote 1
  • There it is 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, Fanuck said:

I have a LOT of empathy for the homeless/mentally ill, a LOT - but I also want myself and my family to be safe in my own community.

There has to be a compromise that benefits both the community at large and the homeless population that respects them as humans and acknowledges they need certain supports, but at the same time - addresses the elephant in the room so to speak in that this cannot be allowed to continue let alone escalate. 

What it is, I don't know - but that's the job of community experts and that's why they're in their respective positions - so far I don't see much progress sadly.   

WELL said! Apparently this particular Tim Hortons has had a homelessness problem for a while now, and with this one woman being allowed to stay there for 5 years every day from open until closing, and management turns a blind eye to it. One day someone is going to get hurt by the riff raff they let in there, and I imagine they'd be legally liable since they were aware of the problem and did nothing to address it and seem to kick out anyone who complains about it rather than kick out the homeless. They need housing, but a coffee shop ain't it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Nucklehead22 said:

WELL said! Apparently this particular Tim Hortons has had a homelessness problem for a while now, and with this one woman being allowed to stay there for 5 years every day from open until closing, and management turns a blind eye to it. One day someone is going to get hurt by the riff raff they let in there, and I imagine they'd be legally liable since they were aware of the problem and did nothing to address it and seem to kick out anyone who complains about it rather than kick out the homeless. They need housing, but a coffee shop ain't it.

It's been a growing issue in Tims for a long time.

 

Spoiler

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Nucklehead22 said:

Supposedly Timmie's excuse for not kicking out the homeless woman is because "she's nice" ......until she's not.

Here in Penticton we have a guy named "bob the Bum"

 

Bob is nice.  he rolls around with a shopping cart train and some brooms.  He sweeps up areas in front of businesses.  He keeps to himself.

 

And then he goes out during the night and steals from every yard or open building he can and when confronted brandishes a knife or pepper spray and attacks people including women in parking lots.  But otherwise, he is totally harmless.

 

There is no easy answer but you are right.  There are a number of people on the street who are genuinely good and harmless people.  But others with mental and addiction issues are time bombs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

Here in Penticton we have a guy named "bob the Bum"

 

Bob is nice.  he rolls around with a shopping cart train and some brooms.  He sweeps up areas in front of businesses.  He keeps to himself.

 

And then he goes out during the night and steals from every yard or open building he can and when confronted brandishes a knife or pepper spray and attacks people including women in parking lots.  But otherwise, he is totally harmless.

 

There is no easy answer but you are right.  There are a number of people on the street who are genuinely good and harmless people.  But others with mental and addiction issues are time bombs.

The combination of Canada's strict gun laws and releasing repeat offenders before trial means there's no deterrent for this kind of behaviour.  As it is, the rights of law-abiding citizens aren't being respected.

 

  • Vintage 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, King Heffy said:

The combination of Canada's strict gun laws and releasing repeat offenders before trial means there's no deterrent for this kind of behaviour.  As it is, the rights of law-abiding citizens aren't being respected.

 

Our Canadian justice system is just a revolving door

  • Cheers 2
  • Vintage 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, King Heffy said:

The combination of Canada's strict gun laws and releasing repeat offenders before trial means there's no deterrent for this kind of behaviour.  As it is, the rights of law-abiding citizens aren't being respected.

 

I own long guns. And we don't have castle laws here in Canada. You going to shoot a guy for trespassing or trying to take your garden hose? What we need is subsidized housing, and places where people can be looked after and treated with dignity. If there's a violence problem. We need secure mental hospitals that can take care of people with troubles. The other sad part is the mentally disturbed "self medicating". Problem is we have NIMBY (Not in my backyard) and people complaining we pay too much in taxes already. We need to improve health in general. Not just physical, but mental. It's going to cost dough. Any ideas? More lotteries?

  • Cheers 1
  • Huggy Bear 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, King Heffy said:

The combination of Canada's strict gun laws and releasing repeat offenders before trial means there's no deterrent for this kind of behaviour.  As it is, the rights of law-abiding citizens aren't being respected.

 

Do not for a second mention gun laws as any sort of reason why this is happening.  Just...don't.  Someone coming in to your yard to steal bottles or just cut through in the middle of the night should not be at risk of being shot or beaten 

 

or did you forget this poor kid?

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/beating-bat-simpson-teichreib-1.5911200

 

Things need to change in our justice system without question, but approaching it with the idea of gun laws being part of the problem is just asking yourself if jumping without a parachute from 10,000 feet is really that dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

Do not for a second mention gun laws as any sort of reason why this is happening.  Just...don't.  Someone coming in to your yard to steal bottles or just cut through in the middle of the night should not be at risk of being shot or beaten 

 

or did you forget this poor kid?

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/beating-bat-simpson-teichreib-1.5911200

 

Things need to change in our justice system without question, but approaching it with the idea of gun laws being part of the problem is just asking yourself if jumping without a parachute from 10,000 feet is really that dangerous

The example you posed was a man threatening women with weapons.  In that kind of situation, I do believe that someone has a right to self defence.

  • Vintage 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nucklehead22 said:

I have a lot of sympathy for homeless people. My brother was homeless once as well. But there also has to be a "tough love" approach. Tim's allowing homeless people to sit in there all the time isn't going to give them the push they need to get better.

a lot of empathy, after calling them riff raff

  • Huggy Bear 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, King Heffy said:

The example you posed was a man threatening women with weapons.  In that kind of situation, I do believe that someone has a right to self defence.

We are not those people.  We do not use guns to solve our issues.  We are better than that.

 

/end conversation

  • Cheers 1
  • Upvote 1
  • Huggy Bear 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...