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Tim Hortons at 3433 North Road in Burnaby: Interwest Restaurants trespassing multiple customers after complaints to Fraser Health; inspection reveals poor sanitation


Nucklehead22

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The divide between rich and poor continues to grow wider and people are being swallowed up in that. Especially our most vulnerable, who are being forced out of their homes because some hot shot investors wants to gobble up everything here. I think we really need a good hard look at who is buying property...and why. The vacancy and speculation taxes only do so much...and often target the wrong people! Duplexes are being ripped down and replaced with mega mansions with concrete parking lots (for big yellow taxi's?).

 

Plus the lack of mental health options and long wait lists have to be addressed. 

 

So many things at the root of homelessness but those in charge are often, themselves, rich lawyers and developers who see no incentive to change as long as they're stuffing their pockets. Serving self interests first and foremost.

 

Plus, as mentioned, NIMBY's who are so stupid. I mean the issue is there whether you try to chase people away or not. Why not give them a shot and try to better their situation which, in turn, betters THE situation?!! It happened here with Turning Point and Rain City Housing (which I fought hard for). Disgusting....people bussed in and not even from here to protest. Based on "property values going down" in new buildings (often being used for Air bnb, birthing homes, etc.). 

 

I visited RainCity not long ago ... my cousin was in there. He had a very tough life....Dad drowned when he was young and his mom was left a widow with 4 kids all under the age of 12. Then their house burned down. Etc. 

 

He fell into addiction and lived a life based on "survival on the streets". He passed away and RainCity did a tree planting in his honour...a good bunch of people just trying to survive this life. We're not all privileged and entitled and need to be a more caring, compassionate society. 

 

As for people seeking shelter in businesses...if they're not being disruptive, I fully support this. If they are, the business is well within their rights to ask them to please leave (and follow up if necessary).

 

But many of us are on the brink these days with the cost of living skyrocketing. These are human beings, just like you and I.

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47 minutes ago, -DLC- said:

Plus the lack of mental health options and long wait lists have to be addressed. 

I read through the articles on the site and it sounds like the homeless person in question doesn't want to accept help. If someone doesn't outwardly appear mentally ill, nothing can be done unfortunately.

 

It also doesn't seem fair to boot well-meaning people, and people who are disabled, as they seem to have done in this scenario, while non-paying homeless customers take up a seat. Not saying the homeless shouldn't be allowed in if they aren't disruptive, but this just seems backwards. It also brings up a lot of human rights issues.

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That is a terribly written article. 
Mental health conditions and homelessness go hand in hand unfortunately and our health care system seems to fail the hardest at mental health care. 
It fails early too, currently the child’s urgent psych referral wait time is 2.5 years where I live. 2.5 years for children with mental health issues, by the time they are seen they will be adults or dead. Early intervention is key with kids.  Well, here it doesn’t exist and it will turn into lifelong issues and for those who are more callous, will cost the healthcare and welfare systems orders of magnitude more. 

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16 minutes ago, Nucklehead22 said:

I read through the articles on the site and it sounds like the homeless person in question doesn't want to accept help. If someone doesn't outwardly appear mentally ill, nothing can be done unfortunately.

 

It also doesn't seem fair to boot well-meaning people, and people who are disabled, as they seem to have done in this scenario, while non-paying homeless customers take up a seat. Not saying the homeless shouldn't be allowed in if they aren't disruptive, but this just seems backwards. It also brings up a lot of human rights issues.

This isn't a credible news site. Burnaby Bulletin which describes itself as "Burnaby's newest breaking news source." has 18 articles that I could find online, and 6 of them are about this Tim Hortons location. It is published on medium.com which is a blogging site. Someone has an axe to grind with this lady and Tim Hortons.

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1 hour ago, DrJockitch said:


Mental health conditions and homelessness go hand in hand unfortunately and our health care system seems to fail the hardest at mental health care. 

Year after year health authorities talk about improving the health care system and year after year it declines.

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1 hour ago, Playoff Beered said:

This isn't a credible news site. Burnaby Bulletin which describes itself as "Burnaby's newest breaking news source." has 18 articles that I could find online, and 6 of them are about this Tim Hortons location. It is published on medium.com which is a blogging site. Someone has an axe to grind with this lady and Tim Hortons.

Medium where? I don't see a Medium link, and it doesn't sound like anyone has an axe to grind since the homeless woman is also now complaining to media too and says she was told to quit spending time there :lol:

 

https://bbybulletin.ca/f/homeless-woman-told-to-spend-less-time-at-tim-hortons

 

The whole thing sounds ridiculous from all sides. Shame on the business for not being proactive, shame on people feeding the homeless (it's like feeding pigeons), and shame on the homeless woman. They all sound like a bunch of complainers. Of course you're going to be told to go somewhere else if you'e sitting at 1 location for 20 hours especially if you're a non-paying customer because that's taking up a seat that a paying customer could use. What do you expect? 

 

If it's the same person, and I presume it is, there was also some Reddit post by the woman's son a couple of weeks ago begging people to stop enabling his mother, saying she's scamming people and isn't homeless and actually has a place to go but that she needs mental health support or something to that effect.

 

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3 minutes ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Considering the OP started two threads on this particular Tim Horton's, maybe they've got some affiliation with the "news" site?  :ph34r:

:lol: Naw found them on reddit.
Couldn't care less about anyone it involves but do care about the lack of shelter space and mh support available for people.

So much for "Ken Sim City", what has he done????????

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2 hours ago, Nucklehead22 said:

Medium where? I don't see a Medium link, and it doesn't sound like anyone has an axe to grind since the homeless woman is also now complaining to media too and says she was told to quit spending time there :lol:

 

https://bbybulletin.ca/f/homeless-woman-told-to-spend-less-time-at-tim-hortons

 

The whole thing sounds ridiculous from all sides. Shame on the business for not being proactive, shame on people feeding the homeless (it's like feeding pigeons), and shame on the homeless woman. They all sound like a bunch of complainers. Of course you're going to be told to go somewhere else if you'e sitting at 1 location for 20 hours especially if you're a non-paying customer because that's taking up a seat that a paying customer could use. What do you expect? 

 

If it's the same person, and I presume it is, there was also some Reddit post by the woman's son a couple of weeks ago begging people to stop enabling his mother, saying she's scamming people and isn't homeless and actually has a place to go but that she needs mental health support or something to that effect.

 

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The bbybulletin has only "published" 18 articles, and 6 of them are about this subject, and they are using a medium.com blogging template, it's a shitty source to start a thread with. I posted the link with the medium affiliation in my first reply to this topic.

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6 hours ago, -DLC- said:

The divide between rich and poor continues to grow wider and people are being swallowed up in that.

I think this is a very important point in this discussion.

 

To provide low-cost (or no-cost) housing for those who need it, social services for those who need it, and institutionalized help for those who need it will cost a lot of money.

 

Where is that money going to come from?

 

It's not an exciting proposal but I think it's probably a necessary one:  governments - provincially, federally and world-wide - have to review their tax rates, especially on upper income earners.

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The political, legal, housing and health components of society all need to work together to find that balance in some sort of common sense solution 

 

Without one of those fully on board any solution will be a half measure. 
 

Sentencing guideline need to change. Housing needs more spaces. Mental health facilities need expansion and full funding. Politicians have to get more proactive instead of waiting to be reactive. Police need more training to deal with mental health disturbances along with dedicated mental health nurses/personnel to assist them in deescalatory measures. 
 

I’m for involuntary institutionalization for some but not all. If it’s their last best option then it’s better than being unsafe out in the streets or making the streets unsafe. 
 

I’m also for the restorative criminal justice system, but when it becomes a revolving door and restoration doesn’t seem like a short term solution, then sentencing, bail and probation guidelines need to be redressed. 
 

Pay for it all with more revenue vis-a-vis Play Now commercials. 
 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Sharpshooter said:

The political, legal, housing and health components of society all need to work together to find that balance in some sort of common sense solution 

 

Without one of those fully on board any solution will be a half measure. 
 

Sentencing guideline need to change. Housing needs more spaces. Mental health facilities need expansion and full funding. Politicians have to get more proactive instead of waiting to be reactive. Police need more training to deal with mental health disturbances along with dedicated mental health nurses/personnel to assist them in deescalatory measures. 
 

I’m for involuntary institutionalization for some but not all. If it’s their last best option then it’s better than being unsafe out in the streets or making the streets unsafe. 
 

I’m also for the restorative criminal justice system, but when it becomes a revolving door and restoration doesn’t seem like a short term solution, then sentencing, bail and probation guidelines need to be redressed. 
 

Pay for it all with more revenue vis-a-vis Play Now commercials. 
 

 

 

Legalizing and taxing all drugs would certainly help with the costs.

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1 minute ago, King Heffy said:

Legalizing and taxing all drugs would certainly help with the costs.

Alcohol, Tobacco and Weed already are. 
 

Not sure taxing coke, crack, shrooms, meth and what not will make up the budgetary shortfall. 
 

 

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14 minutes ago, Nucklehead22 said:

Would legalizing/taxing things really change anything though? homeless problems, drugs, etc have been a growing problem for years. why would things suddenly change out of the blue now?

Nothing is going to 'suddenly' change these problems.  It's going to take time and a lot of money.  But the money has to come from somewhere.  And tax changes would seem to be one major method of supplying that money.

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9 hours ago, UnkNuk said:

Nothing is going to 'suddenly' change these problems.  It's going to take time and a lot of money.  But the money has to come from somewhere.  And tax changes would seem to be one major method of supplying that money.

Governments have been firing money at these problems for decades. To what effect? I am not arguing against support but questioning effectiveness to date. How are objectives set, monitored and results evaluated. It reminds me of the KIRO news doc from a year ago where drug addiction in Seattle were studied. Recovered addicts talked about 'free drugs' and the lack of success they had. Re-hab could work for many if counselling and consequences were part of the program. 

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2 hours ago, Ghostsof1915 said:

Speaking of which. Since weed has been legalized, has there been an uptake in revenue in Government?

Yes, it is a bit subjective as it is spread between provincial and federal revenue but significantly.

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/dariosabaghi/2022/02/23/canadas-legalization-of-cannabis-has-contributed-435-billion-to-national-gdp/?sh=58aced0349c2

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