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Some idiot says there should be 5-year mandatory licence re-testing in BC lol


Nucklehead22

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Perhaps this is a sign that re tests are not a bad idea:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/at-least-10-dead-after-serious-crash-near-carberry-man-source-says/ar-AA1cBrZ0?bncnt=BroadcastNews_BreakingNews&ocid=00000000&FORM=BNC001&pc=U531&cvid=3f698dd032dc4d0fae214b664082efb1&ei=10

"

At least 10 people are dead after a serious crash between a semi-trailer truck and a Handi-Transit vehicle near the town of Carberry in southwestern Manitoba, a source tells CBC News.

A CBC reporter at the scene says there are multiple tarps on the ground close to where the collision happened at the intersection of the Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 5, just north of Carberry.

The Brandon fire department told CBC News the crash involved a semi-trailer truck and a Handi-Transit vehicle.

RCMP said they'll provide more details about the crash at a news conference featuring representatives from Shared Health and the province at 4:30 p.m. CT.

The response to the crash included 14 critical care medical crew, two helicopters and two planes from the STARS air ambulance service.

STARS spokesperson Blake Robert said that's one of the service's biggest responses ever.

"This is sort of in line with the similar large incidents that we responded to in the past, such as the tragedy with Humboldt Broncos, the incident in James Smith Cree Nation," Robert said.

Robert didn't know yet exactly how many people were transported for medical care after STARS was called just after noon. The helicopters typically take patients to Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre, he said. 

A spokesperson for Shared Health said a mass casualty response is underway, with several Manitoba hospitals prepared to receive patients from the crash, including Health Sciences Centre Winnipeg (HSC) and others in the Prairie Mountain and Winnipeg health regions.

Other patients may need to be relocated to create capacity at HSC, which is the province's largest hospital.

Emergency department, surgical and critical care teams at HSC and the Brandon Regional Health Centre are prepared for incoming patients, the spokesperson said in an email.

Rooms for families have been established at both hospitals. Family members seeking information from HSC are asked to contact the HSC switchboard at 204-787-3661 or 1-877-499-8774, while those seeking information from the Brandon hospital are asked to call 204-578-4080.

 

'Shocking' crash aftermath

A witness to the aftermath of the crash said he saw a burning vehicle in a ditch just after noon on Thursday.

John Proven also saw a semi-trailer truck nearby with a burned front end, and said the burning vehicle in the ditch looked like a van.

He saw about 20 police vehicles and seven or eight ambulances at the scene.

"I have never seen an accident that big," Proven told CBC News in a phone interview. "It's a little bit shocking."

Manitoba RCMP said they've deployed all available resources to the crash, with units from across the western part on the province there to help along with other first responders.

Major crime services will take over the investigation, Mounties said.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I don't know the details, but iirc rules were tightened up immediately after the Humboldt Bronco tragedy- then a few months later relaxed in many provinces. :(

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1 hour ago, Gurn said:

Perhaps this is a sign that re tests are not a bad idea:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/at-least-10-dead-after-serious-crash-near-carberry-man-source-says/ar-AA1cBrZ0?bncnt=BroadcastNews_BreakingNews&ocid=00000000&FORM=BNC001&pc=U531&cvid=3f698dd032dc4d0fae214b664082efb1&ei=10

"

At least 10 people are dead after a serious crash between a semi-trailer truck and a Handi-Transit vehicle near the town of Carberry in southwestern Manitoba, a source tells CBC News.

A CBC reporter at the scene says there are multiple tarps on the ground close to where the collision happened at the intersection of the Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 5, just north of Carberry.

The Brandon fire department told CBC News the crash involved a semi-trailer truck and a Handi-Transit vehicle.

RCMP said they'll provide more details about the crash at a news conference featuring representatives from Shared Health and the province at 4:30 p.m. CT.

The response to the crash included 14 critical care medical crew, two helicopters and two planes from the STARS air ambulance service.

STARS spokesperson Blake Robert said that's one of the service's biggest responses ever.

"This is sort of in line with the similar large incidents that we responded to in the past, such as the tragedy with Humboldt Broncos, the incident in James Smith Cree Nation," Robert said.

Robert didn't know yet exactly how many people were transported for medical care after STARS was called just after noon. The helicopters typically take patients to Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre, he said. 

A spokesperson for Shared Health said a mass casualty response is underway, with several Manitoba hospitals prepared to receive patients from the crash, including Health Sciences Centre Winnipeg (HSC) and others in the Prairie Mountain and Winnipeg health regions.

Other patients may need to be relocated to create capacity at HSC, which is the province's largest hospital.

Emergency department, surgical and critical care teams at HSC and the Brandon Regional Health Centre are prepared for incoming patients, the spokesperson said in an email.

Rooms for families have been established at both hospitals. Family members seeking information from HSC are asked to contact the HSC switchboard at 204-787-3661 or 1-877-499-8774, while those seeking information from the Brandon hospital are asked to call 204-578-4080.

 

'Shocking' crash aftermath

A witness to the aftermath of the crash said he saw a burning vehicle in a ditch just after noon on Thursday.

John Proven also saw a semi-trailer truck nearby with a burned front end, and said the burning vehicle in the ditch looked like a van.

He saw about 20 police vehicles and seven or eight ambulances at the scene.

"I have never seen an accident that big," Proven told CBC News in a phone interview. "It's a little bit shocking."

Manitoba RCMP said they've deployed all available resources to the crash, with units from across the western part on the province there to help along with other first responders.

Major crime services will take over the investigation, Mounties said.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I don't know the details, but iirc rules were tightened up immediately after the Humboldt Bronco tragedy- then a few months later relaxed in many provinces. :(

So retests for everyone then?

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1 hour ago, Gurn said:

Perhaps this is a sign that re tests are not a bad idea:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/at-least-10-dead-after-serious-crash-near-carberry-man-source-says/ar-AA1cBrZ0?bncnt=BroadcastNews_BreakingNews&ocid=00000000&FORM=BNC001&pc=U531&cvid=3f698dd032dc4d0fae214b664082efb1&ei=10

It’s to early to throw fault. Reporters are asking if the bus crossed the main hwy when he/ she shouldn’t have and the cop wouldn’t or couldn’t answer. But as to your saying retesting. That’s ok. I’ll add there’s been no shortage of investigations and enquires focusing on the ( humbolt ) accident and the driver , and the licensing.   To the point, the actual  person who did issue the class 1 should be faced with some accountability. That said here in BC  there’s no getting anything by CVSE. Unfortunately the same can’t be said about service BC  employees. Most industry stake holders and licensing depts are well aware of the shortfall of drivers. I get quarterly magazine from the teamsters and there’s always write ups about this issue. At any given time in Canada there’s a shortfall of drivers averaging 20,000 drivers yearly. I don’t know if that puts pressure on licensing , it shouldn’t. But once the teamsters , and the bc trucking association , and klack start leaning on cabinet ministers re- keeping the economy going Then sh!t does start running down hill. The stake holders position is alway economy based.  having been employed by the province.  ( Hwys) I can say that when the word safety comes up unnecessary things move quickly while nesesary things suffer. When an issue sees opposition its usually streamlined and railroaded through. Conversely much like cops protecting cops ministry of highways (politically) they do look out for themselfs and sometimes accountability gets swept under the carpet. 

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So, I haven't even formulated an opinion on this. What I HATE is the thread title immediately stating whoever thinks this should be the case is an "idiot".

 

I like to think for myself thanks. I don't need some highly opinionated shmuck telling me how I should think. Come up with a normal title, then convince me, don't tell me what to think otherwise.

 

(And honestly, I don't even care how right or wrong it might be, I just hate how this is presented, anyway /rant)

Edited by The Lock
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14 hours ago, chon derry said:

Commercial drivers which includes bus’s 

Them for sure. But of course there are far more bad class 5 and 6 drivers on the road than there are bad class 1 to 4 drivers., they are just operating somewhat less deadly weapons. Regular testing (and higher standards, like maybe at least Class 4 level tests for all drivers) is not a really bad idea, and obviously would improve public safety. Any competent driver who spends any time on the road can easily see that.

 

But as far as age goes, everybody has different skill levels and ages at different rates. Some people are looking and acting (and driving) elderly while still in their 50s, while others appear, act and drive much younger in their 70s.  Ageist attitudes are generally a function of youth and inexperience. Anyone who assumes that 65 is elderly in the 21st century is demonstrating their ignorance.

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24 minutes ago, WeneedLumme said:

Them for sure. But of course there are far more bad class 5 and 6 drivers on the road than there are bad class 1 to 4 drivers., they are just operating somewhat less deadly weapons. Regular testing (and higher standards, like maybe at least Class 4 level tests for all drivers) is not a really bad idea, and obviously would improve public safety. Any competent driver who spends any time on the road can easily see that.

 

But as far as age goes, everybody has different skill levels and ages at different rates. Some people are looking and acting (and driving) elderly while still in their 50s, while others appear, act and drive much younger in their 70s.  Ageist attitudes are generally a function of youth and inexperience. Anyone who assumes that 65 is elderly in the 21st century is demonstrating their ignorance.

Being in a smaller city ( prince rupert) and knowing a lot of people I can safely say there’s a correlation to bad driving habits and intitled attitudes the 2 seem to go hand in hand. I was an equipment operator/ truck driver for 31 years. I had enough of that and drive taxi now. So I spend a lot of time watching this every day. In case you didn’t know rupert is a fast paced small city. Road rage in a city that you can drive  from 1 end to the other in less than 15 minutes. :picard: Lol. 

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