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Trevor Linden at the 1991 Fastest Skater...

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Kevin Biestra

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I have mentioned a couple times on here how fast Trevor Linden was before his knee injury around 1996 or whenever it was that ended his ironman streak.  I have also cited his performance at the 1991 fastest skater competition at the All Star Game.

 

Anyway this guy just did a video on the history of the fastest skater.  It's all right once it gets to Bobby Orr a few minutes in.

 

But anyway Paul Coffey was the fastest guy in the NHL in 1991 and Trevor Linden was in his heat for the contest the way they did it that year...and wasn't far behind Paul at all.  It's just a few seconds if that's all you want to watch but this is the Coffey / Linden heat in the early rounds.

 

Trevor had some wheels...

 

 

 

And if anybody actually wants to watch the entire 1991 skills competition...here is the whole darn thing.

 

 

 

 

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The obvious question...

 

Is it high time to put 5-10 lbs weights on every skater's boots, to slow the whole damned game down? Relative speed is fine & dandy; overall speed of game leads to concussions & nasty board crashes.

 

Slow it all down. Hockey was GREAT in the 70's & 80's. Oh, ban the F***ing butterfly too. Every 'tender looks the same.

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16 minutes ago, Nuxfanabroad said:

The obvious question...

 

Is it high time to put 5-10 lbs weights on every skater's boots, to slow the whole damned game down? Relative speed is fine & dandy; overall speed of game leads to concussions & nasty board crashes.

 

Slow it all down. Hockey was GREAT in the 70's & 80's. Oh, ban the F***ing butterfly too. Every 'tender looks the same.

 

I do miss the individual styles of the goalies.  Stuff like Tony Esposito's invitation to go five hole with the inverted V he would snap shut.

 

51b+IKNru9L._AC_UF894,1000_QL80_.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by Kevin Biestra
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3 hours ago, Kevin Biestra said:

I have mentioned a couple times on here how fast Trevor Linden was before his knee injury around 1996 or whenever it was that ended his ironman streak.  I have also cited his performance at the 1991 fastest skater competition at the All Star Game.

 

Anyway this guy just did a video on the history of the fastest skater.  It's all right once it gets to Bobby Orr a few minutes in.

 

But anyway Paul Coffey was the fastest guy in the NHL in 1991 and Trevor Linden was in his heat for the contest the way they did it that year...and wasn't far behind Paul at all.  It's just a few seconds if that's all you want to watch but this is the Coffey / Linden heat in the early rounds.

 

Trevor had some wheels...

 

 

 

And if anybody actually wants to watch the entire 1991 skills competition...here is the whole darn thing.

 

 

 

 

These were the days.

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Old time hockey also had brutal fights and penalties. Europeans were discriminated against (for the most part) and ethnic diversity while taking in account high skill was nonexistent. That era may be nostalgic for many people, but ignorance was bliss.

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10 hours ago, Dazzle said:

Old time hockey also had brutal fights and penalties. Europeans were discriminated against (for the most part) and ethnic diversity while taking in account high skill was nonexistent. That era may be nostalgic for many people, but ignorance was bliss.

 

I guess...but what does this really have to do with Trevor Linden's speed?

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16 hours ago, Kevin Biestra said:

 

I do miss the individual styles of the goalies.  Stuff like Tony Esposito's invitation to go five hole with the inverted V he would snap shut.

 

51b+IKNru9L._AC_UF894,1000_QL80_.jpg

 

 

 

Why did you photoshop out the "netting" he had between his legs "in that area".:ph34r:

 

I still laugh at the "old stories" of him adding in "extra stuff" in his pads (so they'd be over regulation limits).  Refs would often check out his pads before a game; Tony would just remove all that extra stuffing beforehand & give the refs the pads to measure.  He merely adding back the padding after.  I *think* he was the goalie that started the whole scrapping the ice around his net & adding that "snow/ice" around his posts.  There was this video of him smirking saying "these officials always giving me a hard time".

 

Guys like Cheevers didn't care too much about practice as he'd often just stand beside the net & waive his stick at his teammates taking shots at the net.  Tony O?  He *HATED* being scored on...even in practice.:lol:

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A couple weird comments.   "Gartner would dominate the 90's and 2000's"  whoops ... And if you go back and watch his record at 36... the guy did say "what could he do at 25" but guess he didn't do that math.      At 36, there were a dozen guys who skated 13.5 or less laps either qualifying or in the competition round.   They made them qualify to actually skate infront of the TV.   Hedican, was one of the 13.5ish guys.   But the game is "faster" today.    

 

Also he started with Bobby Orr as the "guy" the revolutionized the sport.   But there was another guy before him, named Bobby Hull, who is still considered one of the fastest skaters all-time despite any clocked times like they do today.   Power skating from one side of the rink to the other was a standard drill.   Something any player in the 80's did anyways.    So glad they did the oval eventually.   Glad they brought up the Larkin time, and do find it curious that Conner McDavid decided to back off the event, one thing I agree is why injure yourself just to please the clock/fans.  

 

Bure.  Still haven't seen anyone skate as fast as he did with the puck (sorry McDavid).   It is a good case study.   Raymond and Hagelin and Hedican.   Super fast guys.   If you can't play the game and compute the puck on your stick and what to do with it ... Messier was also a very fast skater.     You have to be able to do the other things that go with it as well.    Coffey is probably the best skater ever with apologies to Orr and McDavid.  McDavid versus Bure would be interesting.    Not a bad video.   Power skating back in the 80's and 90's was all about lengthening the stride.   Not sure if that's changed with the drills.    Going from 0-60, that's still Bure.  And Coffey still the best skater i've ever seen.   It did seem like there was a boat load of guys in the 90's that could burn rubber, yet Gartner was the man.   Something to consider.   Makes me wonder what other 80's and 70's and 60's guys could do and so on. 

 

Good video, Linden was fast!  Thanks for posting Biestra. 

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14 hours ago, Dazzle said:

Old time hockey also had brutal fights and penalties. Europeans were discriminated against (for the most part) and ethnic diversity while taking in account high skill was nonexistent. That era may be nostalgic for many people, but ignorance was bliss.

What does that have to do with this thread?  BTW, like ISIS,  Afghans, 911, whomever the "enemy" was for you growing up, maybe Russia now in the Ukraine - the West was at war with the USSR back then.    Wasn't until expansion that the league simply had to look elsewhere to find talent.   Trickled in during the 70's, then the Stastny's risked their and their families life to come over and play.   Eventually the wall fell, and the NHL finally got what they needed.   Makarov, Krutov, Larionov, Mogilny, Federov, Bure, and more guys like Selanne (FIN), Nedved, Jagr, Kovelev etc etc etc etc .   Hope you got to watch a few of them play.    Awesome players.  Makarov and Irbe stopped the mighty Wings after an epic season.     Nobody I know was upset to see the league find the talent to replace the talent.     It's naive to think athletes are in better shape today as well.    The almost 3 peat TB a team doing a volleyball day at the beach made me laugh out loud.    I've seen beer leagues compiled of construction crews look in better shape.   Ignorance is bliss for sure.   

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56 minutes ago, IBatch said:

A couple weird comments.   "Gartner would dominate the 90's and 2000's"  whoops ... And if you go back and watch his record at 36... the guy did say "what could he do at 25" but guess he didn't do that math.      At 36, there were a dozen guys who skated 13.5 or less laps either qualifying or in the competition round.   They made them qualify to actually skate infront of the TV.   Hedican, was one of the 13.5ish guys.   But the game is "faster" today.    

 

Also he started with Bobby Orr as the "guy" the revolutionized the sport.   But there was another guy before him, named Bobby Hull, who is still considered one of the fastest skaters all-time despite any clocked times like they do today.   Power skating from one side of the rink to the other was a standard drill.   Something any player in the 80's did anyways.    So glad they did the oval eventually.   Glad they brought up the Larkin time, and do find it curious that Conner McDavid decided to back off the event, one thing I agree is why injure yourself just to please the clock/fans.  

 

Bure.  Still haven't seen anyone skate as fast as he did with the puck (sorry McDavid).   It is a good case study.   Raymond and Hagelin and Hedican.   Super fast guys.   If you can't play the game and compute the puck on your stick and what to do with it ... Messier was also a very fast skater.     You have to be able to do the other things that go with it as well.    Coffey is probably the best skater ever with apologies to Orr and McDavid.  McDavid versus Bure would be interesting.    Not a bad video.   Power skating back in the 80's and 90's was all about lengthening the stride.   Not sure if that's changed with the drills.    Going from 0-60, that's still Bure.  And Coffey still the best skater i've ever seen.   It did seem like there was a boat load of guys in the 90's that could burn rubber, yet Gartner was the man.   Something to consider.   Makes me wonder what other 80's and 70's and 60's guys could do and so on. 

 

Good video, Linden was fast!  Thanks for posting Biestra. 

 

Yeah my other memory like this from those early 90s All Star Games was Doug Wilson representing the Sharks as an old man in his final season or two.  He was in the hardest shot competition...he maybe had the hardest shot of all time.  Legit competitor for MacInnis, Iafrate, etc.  Took off Paul Cavallini's finger with a shot.  But the speed detector didn't work when it was Doug Wilson's turn so he had to take slapshot after slapshot after slapshot.  I think something like the seventh one finally registered.  Still a respectably hard shot but didn't give him a fair shake and he wasn't anywhere close to his prime.

 

25 year old Doug Wilson, 25 year old Mike Gartner...they would have put on a show if the technology had been there to measure them.

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1 hour ago, IBatch said:

A couple weird comments.   "Gartner would dominate the 90's and 2000's"  whoops ... And if you go back and watch his record at 36... the guy did say "what could he do at 25" but guess he didn't do that math.      At 36, there were a dozen guys who skated 13.5 or less laps either qualifying or in the competition round.   They made them qualify to actually skate infront of the TV.   Hedican, was one of the 13.5ish guys.   But the game is "faster" today.    

 

Also he started with Bobby Orr as the "guy" the revolutionized the sport.   But there was another guy before him, named Bobby Hull, who is still considered one of the fastest skaters all-time despite any clocked times like they do today.   Power skating from one side of the rink to the other was a standard drill.   Something any player in the 80's did anyways.    So glad they did the oval eventually.   Glad they brought up the Larkin time, and do find it curious that Conner McDavid decided to back off the event, one thing I agree is why injure yourself just to please the clock/fans.  

 

Bure.  Still haven't seen anyone skate as fast as he did with the puck (sorry McDavid).   It is a good case study.   Raymond and Hagelin and Hedican.   Super fast guys.   If you can't play the game and compute the puck on your stick and what to do with it ... Messier was also a very fast skater.     You have to be able to do the other things that go with it as well.    Coffey is probably the best skater ever with apologies to Orr and McDavid.  McDavid versus Bure would be interesting.    Not a bad video.   Power skating back in the 80's and 90's was all about lengthening the stride.   Not sure if that's changed with the drills.    Going from 0-60, that's still Bure.  And Coffey still the best skater i've ever seen.   It did seem like there was a boat load of guys in the 90's that could burn rubber, yet Gartner was the man.   Something to consider.   Makes me wonder what other 80's and 70's and 60's guys could do and so on. 

 

Good video, Linden was fast!  Thanks for posting Biestra. 

 

Also the first part of the video isn't as good as the rest of it.  He suggests that humans top out at a running speed of 7 mph.  I could sprint at about 20 mph and I was nothing special.  Once the guy gets to the Bobby Orr section he hits his stride but as you say Bobby Hull got neglected...as he often does in these all time discussions of any type.  At least you are around to remember his insane NHL + WHA goal total.

 

Edited by Kevin Biestra
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33 minutes ago, EddieVedder said:

Trevor had such a  powerful stride.  Even when he came back here a 2nd time around, he still was so strong on his skates.  Man i miss having a Linden on this team.  

Linden always showed up in the playoffs. 

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12 minutes ago, IBatch said:

Linden always showed up in the playoffs. 

It was the way the team just fought for him as their leader.  His character, his work ethic, his entire demeaner just brought out the best in our team.  Our players would go through a wall for him.  Thats the leader we need here. 

 

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