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Guest AriGold

How Salary Arbitration Works....

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Guest AriGold

That seems like a pretty specific loophole between the last and first rules (respectively) of arbitration.

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Agreed.. The canucks will compare him to Burrows 2 million and Raymond will compare himself to Mike Fisher who got the same exact points as Raymond last year but resigned for five-year, $21 million contract during the 2008 season

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But Fisher has far more years and experience and 40+ point seasons and Selke nominations under his belt.

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As most of you know by now the Canucks have 3 players going to Arbitration. Hansen, Glass and Raymond. I knotice alot of people asking what arbitration is so here is an easy explanation of Salary Arbitration. Hope it helps !

NHL salary arbitration is a tool available to settle some contract disputes. The player and team each propose a salary for the coming season, and argue their cases at a hearing. The arbitrator, a neutral third party, then sets the player's salary. Most players must have four years of NHL experience before they are eligible for salary arbitration (the term is reduced for those who signed their first NHL contract after the age of 20). The process is used by restricted free agents, because it is one of the few bargaining options available to them.

The deadline for players to request salary arbitration is July 5, with cases heard in late July and early August. A player and team can continue to negotiate up until the date of the hearing, in hopes of agreeing on a contract and avoiding the arbitration process.

Teams can also ask for salary arbitration. But a player can be taken to arbitration only once in his career, and can never receive less than 85 per-cent of his previous year's salary. There are no such restrictions on the number of times a player can ask for arbitration, or the size of the salary awarded. A decision must be made within 48 hours of the hearing. When the decision is announced, the team has the right to decline, or "walk away" from the award. If the team exercises this right, the player can declare himself an unrestricted free agent.

Salary Arbitration Proceedings

Every arbitration hearing begins at 9:00 a.m. EDT with the side who filed presenting their case first, followed by the other party. The same order continues for the ensuing rebuttals. Each party is allowed at most 90 minutes total, and they can allocate that time as they wish between their opening arguments and rebuttal.

The filing party is entitled to an additional 10 minutes for surrebuttal only if the opposing side brings up new issues or comparable players (those who are similar in statistics and game, and potentially in contract terms) in their rebuttal.

The evidence that can be used in arbitration cases:

The player's "overall performance" including statistics in all previous seasons.

Injuries, illnesses and the number of games played.

The player's length of service with the team and in the NHL.

The player's "overall contribution" to the team's success or failure.

The player's "special qualities of leadership or public appeal."

The performance and salary of any player alleged to be "comparable" to the player in the dispute.

Comparable players (an arbiter cannot deem another player comparable unless he has been mentioned by one of the parties)

Evidence that is not admissible:

The salary and performance of a "comparable" player who signed a contract as an unrestricted free agent.

Testimonials, video and media reports.

The financial state of the team.

The salary cap and the state of the team's payroll.

Contracts of players not mentioned as comparable players

Past contract offers or negotiations between the player and the team

Arbitration Decisions and Awards

Once an arbitration hearing comes to a close, the arbiter must come to a resolution within the next 48 hours. When his decision is made, there are four key points that must be included: the term of the contract (generally one year, occasionally two years), the salary, any minor league clauses and salary (the latter if applicable), and an explanation of the decision as well as which comparable players were used in consideration.

The team then has an additional two days to consider the ruling before either signing the player to the arbiter-imposed contract or choosing to walk away, leaving the player as an unrestricted free agent.

How NHL Teams and Players can Avoid Arbitration

The preference on both sides of the negotiating table is generally to reach a deal before the scheduled arbitration hearing date, and more often than not that is exactly what happens. From 2007 through 2009, 67 players had filed but only 14 had actually presented their case before an arbiter.

http://proicehockey....arbitration.htm

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Fisher's also enetering his "prime", which is what AriGold might have been getting at. There's a plethora of variables either way; I don't see Raymond getting anything over 2.5m/yr, but even then he's asking a lot of the organization that gave him many, many chances when he (I daresay) refused to shine.

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Compared to other young forwards w/ similar numbers it seems like Raymond could get 3 M per. If that's the case does Gillis let him walk or sign him hoping he finds some consistency in his game and is worth the 3 mil? And if he does let him go (because of cash issues), what's plan B?

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Thanks Ari!It was driving me crazy that I didn't understand it earlier. I was discussing it earlier and I couldn't quite wrap my head around it until now!

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Compared to other young forwards w/ similar numbers it seems like Raymond could get 3 M per. If that's the case does Gillis let him walk or sign him hoping he finds some consistency in his game and is worth the 3 mil? And if he does let him go (because of cash issues), what's plan B?

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Guest AriGold

Which other forwards would you compare him to that's making 3M?

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Guest AriGold

Thanks Ari!It was driving me crazy that I didn't understand it earlier. I was discussing it earlier and I couldn't quite wrap my head around it until now!

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Guest AriGold

May Ray better re-sign with us..

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2.8-3, over 2 years? Wonder what he will feel like if he is the reason we have to drop Bieksa :P

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Guest AriGold

2.8-3, over 2 years? Wonder what he will feel like if he is the reason we have to drop Bieksa :P

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Guest AriGold

As the poster said in the Eric Fehr signing, this most definatly does help the canucks. There almost the same points per game last season and both had career years. Fehr signing for 4.4 over 2 years is exactly what the Canucks needed to help there case.

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Asked this in another thread regarding arbitration, but never saw it answered or I'm blind. Can a player be traded after arbitration or are the clubs hands tied? If Raymond gets a contract that is just too rich, are we able to move him or stuck with it? I thought they were untradeable for the year, but I can only find that if you match an offer sheet that rules apply.

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<br />Asked this in another thread regarding arbitration, but never saw it answered or I'm blind.  Can a player be traded after arbitration or are the clubs hands tied?  If Raymond gets a contract that is just too rich, are we able to move him or stuck with it?  I thought they were untradeable for the year, but I can only find that if you match an offer sheet that rules apply.<br />

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<br />Asked this in another thread regarding arbitration, but never saw it answered or I'm blind.  Can a player be traded after arbitration or are the clubs hands tied?  If Raymond gets a contract that is just too rich, are we able to move him or stuck with it?  I thought they were untradeable for the year, but I can only find that if you match an offer sheet that rules apply.<br />

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