Jump to content

Welcome to canucks.com Vancouver Canucks homepage

Photo

Inside the Hell's Angels - Vancouver Sun Multimedia Special Report


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:13 PM

Vancouver Sun crime reporter Kim Bolan launched her series "Inside the Hell's Angles Saturday, This six-part series started Saturday, Jan. 26, with the final instalment on Friday, Feb. 1. Part Two goes Sunday at 8pm.

The series tells the story of former police agent Micheal Plante who met with Bolan in late 2012 to tell his incredible story of infiltrating the East End chapter of the Hells Angels and helping police put 12 men behind bars.
http://www.insidetheangels.com/

Check out the link as it has audio interviews, photos,etc. As well as other background material. There is also a timeline and THE BIKER FILES - Images, articles and notes from the Sun's biker gang files, from 1966 to the present.

Check the website later today at 8pm for the next instalment.

Part One: The man who infiltrated the Angels


Vancouver Sun crime reporter Kim Bolan has written extensively about gangs and organized crime in B.C. She was first contacted by former police agent Micheal Plante in June 2010 about a possible interview. He had followed her articles for years and said he felt confident she would do justice to his story about infiltrating the East End chapter of the Hells Angels as part of an unprecedented police investigation dubbed E-Pandora. It would take another two and a half years for E-Pandora to conclude, freeing Plante to finally tell his story. In part one of Bolan’s six-part series, Plante describes his early life and how he came up with the plan to get close to the Angels.



When he was a boy growing up on the Lower Mainland, Micheal Plante loved his family’s annual trip to the Pacific National Exhibition.


It wasn’t the thrill of the rides that attracted the only son of a single teacher mom. Every year, Plante would race inside one of the pavilions to see the Vancouver police exhibit.


“My whole life I wanted to be a cop,” he recalled recently. He worried he would never grow tall enough to reach the minimum height requirement. His tiny mom was under five feet. He never knew his dad.


“In those days you had to be five foot 10. I would also say, ‘Please, please make me five foot 10.’”


While Plante made it to five foot nine, he never made it onto the VPD or any other police force.


But he still managed to take on one of the biggest criminal gangs in B.C.


Beginning a decade ago, he infiltrated the Hells Angels’ East End chapter — one of the richest and most powerful in the world. At first he did it on his own. Then he became a confidential informant and eventually a police agent.


He wore a wire for 10 months in 2004 and 2005 — sometimes 24/7 — secretly recording criminal activities both inside the bikers’ East Georgia clubhouse and beyond its fortified walls.


When it was all over, 12 Hells Angels and associates were convicted for offences including trafficking cocaine and methamphetamine, extortion, conspiracy, possession of firearms and grenades, and contempt of court. The elite chapter of the notorious biker gang was left in tatters.


In a series of exclusive interviews with The Vancouver Sun, Plante, now 46, told his remarkable story publicly for the first time. He was able to finally speak because the long-running RCMP investigation – E-Pandora – formally ended on Oct. 30, 2012, when the last outstanding charge was stayed against full-patch Angel John Punko.



The interviews took place in a North American city that Plante was visiting. For his own safety, Plante lives under a different name in an undisclosed location — which were not revealed to The Sun — as he moves forward with his post-Pandora life.


Plante has remained silent for years as defence lawyers attacked his reputation during three criminal trials, calling him a rat, a thug, a drug dealer and an opportunist who signed a contract promising him $1 million by the end of the case.


The lawyers also repeatedly claimed he only helped police in order to make an extortion charge go away after he was arrested in downtown Vancouver with an HA member and associate in July 2003.


Plante agreed to talk because he wanted to set the record straight. He told The Sun that he never requested — nor received — assistance with the criminal charge that was eventually stayed for lack of evidence.DC_Van_Sun06.jpg “There was never any help,” he said.


RCMP Insp. Gary Shinkaruk, who was in charge of E-Pandora, confirmed that Plante made no deal to get out of his legal troubles and told police he wanted to help them for altruistic reasons.


Plante also revealed to The Sun that he had already begun the process of infiltrating the Hells Angels on his own long before he was arrested.


And he said he tried to reach out to police several times from the inside to let them know he could provide information about what he saw going on within the club.


He says his calls to police were not returned.


“I infiltrated them myself and I made phone call after phone call after phone call and nothing happened.”


So why would Plante decide to ingratiate himself with the Hells Angels, hoping to expose the bikers for the criminals he believed they were?


He insisted he didn’t do it expecting a big payday. He took on the dangerous role because he wanted to make a difference.


He had been passed over when he applied to several police forces. He had ended up working as a bouncer in rough bars and clubs for years. Now he had the chance to work with police, just as he had always dreamed of as a child.


“I wasn’t a rat. They were not my friends. I wasn’t friends with any of them. I was doing a job,” he said. “I wanted to leave a legacy. I wanted to do something significant in my life. I never bartered or sold myself to the RCMP for money. That was the HA’s angle.”


Micheal Dollard Plante was born in North Vancouver on Jan. 6, 1967. He and his two sisters moved around a lot as kids as their mother got teaching jobs across B.C. — Vancouver, Revelstoke, Powell River, Chilliwack, New Westminster, Burnaby.


He switched schools often before graduating from Burnaby’s Cariboo Hill secondary in 1986.


“I was the new kid in school 11 times,” he said. “I just went with the flow. And that is how I went through my whole life. I will walk into a room not knowing anybody, but I will leave that room knowing everybody.”


He learned early how to reinvent himself — something that would come in handy later in life. When he moved to Revelstoke, he told other kids he was a kung fu master.


“That was my story. I stuck to it for about a month until they called me on it,” he recalled, laughing. “I said, ‘Actually I can run really fast, but I don’t know kung fu — see you later.’”


He liked sports but couldn’t start playing until 12 or 13 because of Perthes disease, a hip condition that had been treated with casts when he was a preschooler.


As he got older, there were still things he wasn’t supposed to do, like jumping. His mom taught in his school and kept a watchful eye. “It was only when I could get away from my mom as I got older that I could play sports.”


He took to competitive rugby, weightlifting, soccer and baseball. Money was tight at home, so he paid for everything himself.


“When I was 11 years old, I would go and get up at six o’clock in the morning on a Saturday and I would go to the park with my little wagon and I would collect beer bottles from the kids boozing the night before,” he said. “And that’s how I would make my money. Who else does that?” His mom always got them a place in a nice neighbourhood, where other kids had many more luxuries than Plante and his sisters.


“We were bare bones, right? My sisters, they ended up stealing. That’s how they dealt with it. I am not a stealer. I am not a thief. That was never my thing,” he said.


“I remember getting mad at my mom one time because we were at a doctor's office and she took a magazine. I said, ‘That magazine doesn’t belong to you. You try to tell the sisters they shouldn’t be stealing and you are taking a magazine.’”


Plante was athletic, hard-working and outgoing. But he also struggled with anxiety attacks that could paralyze him — making it hard for him to leave the house. It made him so sick when he was 15 that he missed all of Grade 10.


“I felt like I was choking. It was the tension, but to me it felt like I had a ball in my throat. Then I didn’t eat,” he said.


After a while, he couldn’t get out of bed. His doctor thought it was a bad flu bug. But a specialist later suggested it might be stress-related.


He learned to cope with it himself — a skill that he would have to rely on as an adult.


“I kind of had to go mind over matter and willed it away.”


Plante is proud of the fact he has worked hard all his life.


As a teen in Powell River, he was thrilled to get a part-time warehouse job at $9 an hour. Back in Burnaby for his last two years of high school, the only work he could find was at McDonald’s for the $2.65 minimum wage.


“Money-wise it was terrible. But I worked every day, so it kind of evened out. I met lots of girls because I worked at the one by Lougheed Mall. It was all of the Centennial High girls,” he said. “It was new. It was actually fun. It was actually the first fun school year in my life.”


After he graduated in 1986 — a year late — Plante was set for “good times,” working at Canadian Tire for $5.75 an hour. His girlfriend had a car.


“I was going to buy a house,” he recalled. “I thought, ‘I don’t need to go back to school.’”


He switched jobs again, eventually returning to work for McDonald’s as a security guard at its downtown Granville location.


“They wanted all the drug addicts to get kicked out of the McDonald’s. I worked there till ’87.”


It was a new phase for Plante — by then a competitive power lifter — that would lead into his work as a bouncer at nightclubs from Surrey to downtown Vancouver.


He enjoyed the life — the clubs all had live bands back then and things would get rowdy. Rock stars would show up unannounced to drink after their own shows.


It was during his years as a doorman at Coconuts, on Kingsway in Burnaby in the late ‘80s, that he first met some of the future Hells Angels he would help put in jail.


“That’s when I met all those guys,” he said.



Louie Robinson, an original East End member, came by occasionally.


Vince Brienza, then a prospect, wore his leather vest into Coconuts with two other bikers the first night Plante worked there.


“I didn’t even know what the hell the vest meant,” Plante said. “I said, 'Oh you guys have kind of a cool vest with British Columbia on the back of it.’” There were big fights in the bars and clubs back then and doormen were enforcers who had to break them up. Police were rarely called. And if they did come, it was the bouncers who would get charged.


“That’s just the way it was. Throughout the years, I had 23 assault charges. Zero convictions,” Plante said.


“That’s what you did. You fought. There were no lawsuits back in those days.”


The only charge that stuck came in 1991, when he was still dreaming of being a cop. He was studying criminology at Douglas College and went to work out at North Vancouver’s Empire Fitness.


“The other guy started the fight and he ended up on the losing end,” he said. The victim didn’t show up in court. A sympathetic judge gave Plante a conditional discharge and 100 hours of community service so as not to interfere with his schooling.


While at Douglas, he began applying to various police forces, hoping to land his dream job.


“I applied four different times, and I never got in. I applied to VPD. I applied to New Westminster. I applied twice to the RCMP and I applied once for a sheriff’s job,” he said.


Disappointed and disillusioned, he ended up back working as a bouncer at Surrey’s Dell Hotel, a gritty place in the 10600-block of King George Hwy, where bikers liked to drink. It was there Plante ran into Randy Potts again in 1992.


Potts, one of the 12 people later convicted in E-Pandora, was running kilos of cocaine out of a room there with the Dell’s manager and another man. They were getting the bricks from the Hells Angels, of which Potts was not yet a member.bolan part 1 alvarez etc “They had a room in the hotel where they would stash the kilos and people would come in and grab the stuff,” Plante said.


The manager asked him to babysit the cocaine — sitting in the room to make sure no one stole the product. “I had been turned down to become a cop and I just didn’t care,” Plante said. “I never dealt anything. I was never hands on.”


In fact, he didn’t even see the cocaine — it was hidden in the ceiling of the hotel room. And the extra money was good. He earned about $200 a day.


“Then, typical drug dealers, they got cheap and didn’t want to pay me anymore. Sure enough, after they did this, word got out and a couple of kilos got stolen.”


RCMP was tipped to the trafficking and raided the Dell.


During his stint at the Dell, Plante met a lot of people who would become major players in B.C.’s lucrative drug trade, including Tom Gisby, who was gunned down in Mexico last May.


“I didn’t drink then. I hung with them. We would work out,” he said. “We always did things together. We were friends. You work in a bar, you are going to meet with these kinds of people.”


They liked having Plante around. He could give someone a ride or keep them out of trouble. “They called me the pit bull because I didn’t drink and I wasn’t an idiot.”


Potts asked for Plante’s help to get into shape. Potts confided that he had just kicked a Percocet habit developed because of a bad back. “He started talking to me and I got to know him,” Plante said. “That guy was a career criminal.”


He said Potts boasted about years of illicit activity, from stealing vehicles and boats in his native Kingston, Ont., to his drug deals at the Dell. By 1994, Plante was ready for a change of pace and scenery. He moved to Alberta, after an old high school friend promised to help him get hired on the oil rigs.


The job never materialized and Plante was back bouncing in Medicine Hat. He returned to B.C. less than a year later, after breaking up with a girlfriend. His anxiety returned.


“My heart was broken,” he said of losing the relationship. “I didn’t want to go back to the bar. I didn’t want to go back to school even though I should have gone back to school ….my head wasn’t in the right place. I didn’t care.”


He started working at the Surrey Costco in March 1995, driving a forklift on the graveyard shift. He hated the job, but stuck with it for more than five years — his only relief was competing in power lifting in his off-hours, using steroids to increase his strength.


“It is proven fact that people who work graveyard shifts go crazy,” Plante said. “To stay awake, I was drinking like 12 (large coffees) a day. I was taking ephedrine. And I wasn’t eating because I wasn’t sleeping …. It was just self-destruction.”


During a performance review, he was told he didn’t smile enough.


“Smile? Smile at who? What am I happy about? This is a crapty job. There are no windows in here,” he said.


He ended up leaving before he was laid off, qualifying for unemployment insurance because he said he left to take another job that hadn’t materialized. For the first time since he was a kid, he had time to sit in his small $400-a-month New Westminster apartment, read books and reflect.


He also started reading the paper. In January 2001, he saw articles about some of the people he used to see during his bouncer days — Ronnie Lising and Chico Pires. They had become the first B.C. Hells Angels convicted of trafficking after a doorman at the Marble Arch strip club cooperated with Vancouver police to gather evidence.


“The Hells Angels were all over the news. And that thing about being a cop was still in my head and I actually pondered going back and getting my schooling finished,” he said.


But at 34, he thought he was too old. And another idea started taking root after he read Into the Abyss, a book by Canadian author Yves Lavigne about Tony Tait, an Alaskan Angel who turned on his gang brethren and worked covertly for the FBI.


If Tait could pull it off, Plante thought, why couldn’t he?


“This can’t be too hard,” he said to himself. “I remembered these guys from Coconuts.”


He thought he could maybe write a book too. He thought he could maybe help police. But he decided to wait before reaching out to law enforcement.


“I wanted to see how easy this could be. I am a methodical person. When I put my mind to something, I can do it right,” he said.


“I had come out of this five-year fog. I had such promise back in the early ‘90s. This isn’t how it should have been. Everyone had passed me by.” But not for long.


Plante began to put his plan into action.

http://www.insidetheangels.com/
  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#2 G-52

G-52

    Comets Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 694 posts
  • Joined: 29-April 12

Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:29 PM

I personally know a few hells angels members on the island, they are actually pretty nice guys. Sure they do illegal crap, but they don't hurt anyone that isn't trying to frack them around. Maybe the Island is a little more lax even for the HA.
  • 0

Posted Image


#3 El_Capitan

El_Capitan

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,591 posts
  • Joined: 24-December 03

Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:34 PM

*
POPULAR

I personally know a few hells angels members on the island, they are actually pretty nice guys. Sure they do illegal crap, but they don't hurt anyone that isn't trying to frack them around. Maybe the Island is a little more lax even for the HA.


Yes, and all their earnings go towards building churches and schools in Haiti!

Really? Really?
  • 6

Posted Image


#4 hsedin33

hsedin33

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,642 posts
  • Joined: 14-February 10

Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:50 PM

I personally know a few hells angels members on the island, they are actually pretty nice guys. Sure they do illegal crap, but they don't hurt anyone that isn't trying to frack them around. Maybe the Island is a little more lax even for the HA.


The happy face they present is to make sure you don't call the cops and give them a reason to search they're vehicles for which they use for human trafficking, drugs, dead bodies etc..
  • 0

#5 Ghostsof1915

Ghostsof1915

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,669 posts
  • Joined: 31-January 07

Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:03 PM

Yes, they are sweet, nice people, until they find a reason to bully, steal from you, or kill you. If all they did was ride Harley's and brag about all the chrome on their bikes that would be fine.

Once you're outside the law, you're all the way outside.
  • 2
GO CANUCKS GO!
"The Canucks did not lose in 1994. They just ran out of time.." Barry MacDonald Team1040

Posted Image

#6 G-52

G-52

    Comets Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 694 posts
  • Joined: 29-April 12

Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

The happy face they present is to make sure you don't call the cops and give them a reason to search they're vehicles for which they use for human trafficking, drugs, dead bodies etc..


Im sure some do that, but id be pretty surprised if the guys I know are trafficking humans and dead bodies, and I could care less about the pot they may or may not sell... I am not disagreeing with you by any stretch, I realize gangs and gang violence is a terrible thing that is helping destroy our planet. But what Im saying is they aren't ALL like that.
  • 0

Posted Image


#7 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:05 PM

Plante obvious didn't plan to join with the intent of helping law enforcement, that part came only after it was obvious he wasn't ever going to make it.



  • 0
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas

#8 Cromeslab

Cromeslab

    Comets Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 841 posts
  • Joined: 16-August 10

Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:20 PM

Went to junior high school with Mike in Powell River,from what I can remember the guy always had a chip on his shoulder.
  • 0
Posted Image

"Where you've been is good and gone,all you can keep is the gettin there"Townes Van Zandt

#9 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:30 PM

Im sure some do that, but id be pretty surprised if the guys I know are trafficking humans and dead bodies, and I could care less about the pot they may or may not sell... I am not disagreeing with you by any stretch, I realize gangs and gang violence is a terrible thing that is helping destroy our planet. But what Im saying is they aren't ALL like that.


It's usually only in the movies do evil people come off as sinister and menacing under normal circumstances.
  • 0
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas

#10 literaphile

literaphile

    Comets Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts
  • Joined: 25-March 06

Posted 27 January 2013 - 10:33 PM

*
POPULAR

Im sure some do that, but id be pretty surprised if the guys I know are trafficking humans and dead bodies, and I could care less about the pot they may or may not sell... I am not disagreeing with you by any stretch, I realize gangs and gang violence is a terrible thing that is helping destroy our planet. But what Im saying is they aren't ALL like that.


If they've got full patches, they've done terrible things.
  • 5

#11 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:31 AM

Now up on the website - Part Two: Earning the Trust of the Angels.

In part two, Plante talks about how he was able to use his connections as a bouncer to befriend associates of the East End Hells Angels and work his way into the legendary clubhouse.


How does a regular guy set out to infiltrate the Hells Angels on his own?


Micheal Plante decided the first thing he should do was go buy support shirts at Hi-Way Choppers, a Burnaby motorcycle shop owned by John Bryce, president of the Hells Angels’ East End chapter.


Support shirts have slogans indicating the wearer’s enthusiasm for the Hells Angels.


Some say “Support East End” or “Support Nomads,” specifying a certain chapter. Others say, “Support the Red and White,” another phrase that refers to the Hells Angels.


Plante would wear one of his new shirts a couple of times a week to Fitness Quest, a gym then located near Sixth and Cambie – just two blocks from the Vancouver police station.


He knew from a friend that lots of Hells Angels and their associates worked out there, including John Punko, Ronnie Lising, Juel Stanton and a man named Caine Munoz, who along with Lising had recently been convicted of trafficking cocaine.


Plante became friendly with the people he met at the gym, but he was hardly getting close. Things got easier when he was offered a job in late 2001 at the Marble Arch, the Richards Street strip club in which two East End Angels had been caught selling coke.


“Nothing was really happening through the gym,” Plante recalled. “The Marble Arch is where it all went down.”

http://www.insidetheangels.com/
  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#12 Buggernut

Buggernut

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,526 posts
  • Joined: 15-March 03

Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:02 PM

Yes, they are sweet, nice people, until they find a reason to bully, steal from you, or kill you. If all they did was ride Harley's and brag about all the chrome on their bikes that would be fine.

Once you're outside the law, you're all the way outside.


Hopefully, most of them don't drag civilian friends or associates into their world.

I know one personally, and he seems to be as good a guy and worker as anyone else. As for what he does with his biker buddies, I'd rather not know or get involved in.

Edited by Buggernut, 28 January 2013 - 01:04 PM.

  • 0

#13 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,393 posts
  • Joined: 09-February 09

Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:16 PM

Meh I grew up around em. When I was a teen I remember wanting to try and join up. Then I went to a barbecue with a Quebec chapter. After a conversation with one man, with a thick French Canadian accent - something along the lines of smashing a bottle of someone's head in a bar, stabbing him, then dragging the guy outside. Finishing him off or something... Can't remember exact details as we were drinking, but it scared me.

I think it's mainly a younger male phase that attracts guys into the club. Flashing some money and power. But on the inside you just end up as someone's female dog... Or worse.

Let me just add that I have been around growing up in east van. Seen em all including triads UN scorpions ect ect. By far the scariest of any group I have ever met were the French Canadian HA. I would never go to another BBQ like that ever again. I was a rugged kid but I had that feeling of being in a meat grinder. It was like being in the middle of a pack of wild dogs and it wouldn't take much but a little weakness for you to be singled out.

Edited by Special Ed, 28 January 2013 - 01:28 PM.

  • 2

If you like looking at statistics to determine who's better, you're just a casual fan.

2.41 season GAA isn't very impressive. Let's not get into playoffs and his SV%.

Cory Schneider is the next Patrick Roy.


#14 DonLever

DonLever

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,186 posts
  • Joined: 11-December 08

Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:26 PM

The Hell Angels deny they are a criminal organization. They say they are just a bunch a guys that get together to enjoy motorcyling.

Are they really that bad? Are they being picked upon because they just stand out and how they look and dress?

Crooks that wear business suits probably steal more than them.

Edited by DonLever, 28 January 2013 - 01:27 PM.

  • 0

#15 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,393 posts
  • Joined: 09-February 09

Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:33 PM

The Hell Angels deny they are a criminal organization. They say they are just a bunch a guys that get together to enjoy motorcyling.

Are they really that bad? Are they being picked upon because they just stand out and how they look and dress?

Crooks that wear business suits probably steal more than them.


They are great when you meet them you will be taken out to associated bars and restaurants. All paid for and VIP. Going into a high class kitchen to smoke a joint around the chefs while they prep your meal.

Then one day you're asked to do a favour and eventually a few more. If you screw up maybe you will just get beat up. Or a bounty placed on you. Or even worse of course. When their nice their nice... The problem is when they're pissed.
  • 1

If you like looking at statistics to determine who's better, you're just a casual fan.

2.41 season GAA isn't very impressive. Let's not get into playoffs and his SV%.

Cory Schneider is the next Patrick Roy.


#16 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:07 PM

No major criminal organization is made up of nice people exactly, but the HA seem to be particularily treacherous, corrupting and prone to eating their own out of spite.


  • 1
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas

#17 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:08 PM

The Hell Angels deny they are a criminal organization. They say they are just a bunch a guys that get together to enjoy motorcyling.

Are they really that bad? Are they being picked upon because they just stand out and how they look and dress?

Crooks that wear business suits probably steal more than them.

The HA may deny that they are a criminal organization but history and criminal convictions say otherwise. The 6 part series Inside the Angels provides a look at the organization from the inside and was the basis for numerous convictions..

They really are that bad.

BTW a lot of the white collar crime and securities fraud involves HA and the Mafia.


The B.C. government also announced in November 2012 it would pursue the seizure of the Kelowna and East Vancouver clubhouses under civil forfeiture law, arguing they have been used to engage in unlawful activities -- including drug trafficking, assaults, extortions, uttering threats and manslaughter or murder.


The B.C. Government has launched a civil lawsuit to seize two more Hells Angels clubhouses, this time in East Vancouver and Kelowna.


The claim uses the Civil Forfeiture Act, which does not have the same burden of proof as a criminal proceeding. It was used successfully to seize the Nanaimo Hells Angels clubhouse five years ago.


In the latest lawsuit the Crown alleges the clubhouses in Kelowna and Vancouver's East End are linked to extortion, assaults and even murder.


In August eight men associated with the Kelowna Hells Angels club were charged for allegedly running a marijuana and cocaine operation with links to Panama and Mexico, following a raid on the clubhouse.


Justice Minister Shirley Bond's office issued a brief statement, saying the claim comes as the result of referrals from the RCMP.


"These properties are known to police as the Hells Angels East End Chapter and Kelowna Chapter clubhouses. The claim was filed as a result of referrals to the Civil Forfeiture Office by the RCMP. It will be up to a Supreme Court justice to determine whether or not the properties should be forfeited," said a statement issued by the minster's office.


The Hells Angels Motorcycle club has not yet filed a response. The seizure of the Nanaimo clubhouse is still before the courts.


There are nine Hells Angels chapters in B.C.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/11/21/bc-hells-angels-clubhouse.html

Here is the application filed in BC Supreme Court under the Civil Forfeiture Act setting out the grounds:
http://www.documentc...tml#document/p1

In Surrey, Mayor Watts and RCMP Chief Supt. Bill Fordy have both told the HA they are not welcome in Surrey and they will not be allowed to set up a clubhouse there.


Surrey’s mayor says they’re not welcome. The city’s chief of police has told them so, personally.


But the Hells Angels say they’re not discouraged by the police pressure around their supposed move into the city.


They’ve already set up shop — just not formally.


“It is a fact that many Hells Angels live in Surrey, have done so for many years and will continue to do so in the future,” said Rick Ciarniello, spokesman for the motorcycle club.


“We are not intimidated or discouraged by police pressure.”


After two more “high profile” murders in the city, RCMP Chief Supt. Bill Fordy issued a statement late last week re-assuring residents of ongoing “gang enforcement and eradication measures.”


“The landscape of violent crime and organized crime groups is constantly changing, and spans the Lower-Mainland,” said Fordy.


“I have personally met with a local chapter president of the Hells Angels to discourage their establishing a chapter in Surrey, and to date, they have not.”


Ciarniello calls the plans to establish the Westpoint clubhouse in the city “police speculation”.


Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts said the motorcycle club has yet to file any formal request.


“As it stands right now, our officer met with them and clearly stated that they were not welcome in the City of Surrey, and has had some further discussion with them,” Watts said.


“In a situation like this, those initiatives are best left up to the RCMP ... to ensure that no illegal activity or clubhouse gets up here.”

http://www.theprovince.com/news/Hells+Angels+they+aren+leaving+Surrey+despite+pressure+from+RCMP+boss/7879669/story.html#ixzz2JJ4YpHMp
  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#18 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,393 posts
  • Joined: 09-February 09

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:28 PM

You can't simply remove the HA from BC either. They are the top dogs and there is a line underneath them just waiting. Every organized group bows to them or consults them on some level - or pays a price. I have seen this personally. I was in Kelowna partying it up. While at a bar I just talked to a couple HA joking around a little. Later on a guy approached me and identified himself as red scorpion - lifting his sleave and revealing his tattoo. He bought me drinks the rest of the night and asked if there was anything else I needed. I figured he thought I was HA but there's an example of what I experienced.

If you remove the HA there will be an empty vacuum of opportunity. All the other players in line will want in. It would be devastating to our province I personally believe as all hell would break loose. At least that's just my opinion is that other groups would all fight for power and control. It would have to be a drastic measure that effects every group, not just the HA to stop anything. And it would still likely be very ugly and costly. Time being the HA seem to be a necessary evil.

Edited by Special Ed, 28 January 2013 - 02:29 PM.

  • 0

If you like looking at statistics to determine who's better, you're just a casual fan.

2.41 season GAA isn't very impressive. Let's not get into playoffs and his SV%.

Cory Schneider is the next Patrick Roy.


#19 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:34 PM

The other thing about the HA is thst with their high profile they take most of the attention away from the bigger organized crime groups operating in Canada, both in the general indirect sense and in that these groups can use the Angels as middlemen instead of having to put a significant number of their own people out there.
  • 0
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas

#20 ThaBestPlaceOnEarth

ThaBestPlaceOnEarth

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,071 posts
  • Joined: 13-June 07

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:38 PM

If you ask me, I think this investigation and the success that it had in weakening the HA has actually led to a lot of the gang violence going on lately. If we're going to have drug prohibition, it works best if there's one group with basically a monopoly, enforcing a sort of pax-romana sort of situation. This E-pandora is aptly named because by weakening the HA it put the chum in the water, it let all kinds of other groups start vying for power and position, it opened up a pandora's box of violence in the lower mainland.
  • 0

Ceterum censeo Chicaginem delendam esse


#21 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:27 PM

If you ask me, I think this investigation and the success that it had in weakening the HA has actually led to a lot of the gang violence going on lately. If we're going to have drug prohibition, it works best if there's one group with basically a monopoly, enforcing a sort of pax-romana sort of situation. This E-pandora is aptly named because by weakening the HA it put the chum in the water, it let all kinds of other groups start vying for power and position, it opened up a pandora's box of violence in the lower mainland.


Most of the mid level gangs in B.C. are basically just puppets of the HA, who use them not only to take heat but also as proxies against rivals such as the UN and allies.

If you somehow got rid of the HA it would be business as usual, you might even see a big drop in violence, as the heat avoiding Triads would have even more of a hold over the city than they do already.
  • 0
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas

#22 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 29 January 2013 - 10:23 AM

In part three, Plante sets out how his relationship with police began in July 2003. While he started as an informant, he became a police agent, wearing a wire for months as Hells Angels and associates trafficked drugs and committed other crimes. Plante talks about how he met Bob Paulson, then the RCMP inspector in charge of biker investigations in BC (and now the Commissioner of the RCMP) who pushed for Plante's status as a police agent over objections from HQ.
http://www.insidetheangels.com/

Paulson told Plante how much the police wanted to go after the Hells Angels.


“We are going to put everything we can into it. We have a lot of faith in you. And I will put the best guys on,” Plante quoted Paulson as saying.


It was Paulson’s decision to push forward with E-Pandora and get Plante official agent status, a long process that was finally approved by the RCMP’s top brass in Ottawa in early April 2004.


An agent is different from an informant, who simply provides police with intelligence gleaned from the criminal world. By contrast, an agent takes direction from police and must follow a strict set of legal guidelines.


Informants’ identities are kept confidential, while agents are required to testify in court. And agents can break the law while undercover as long as the conduct is pre-approved by police using Criminal Code exemptions.


However Plante had a major problem that was a barrier to his infiltration of the HA - he could not ride a motorcycle and he did not own one. And acquiring one was an issue since he did not have a visible source of income.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTMFXd1cTjU


Before Plante could really be accepted as an Angel, there were obstacles to overcome. He had never ridden a motorcycle – let alone owned one, which is a requirement for the HA program.


Plante got his Low Rider Harley, which police were to make payments on, from Trev Deeley Motorcycles on Feb. 16, 2004. The total price was $26,388. He also went to Dayton Boots on East Hastings to buy the footwear necessary to complete his costume.


But he still couldn’t ride the Harley and had to take lessons in Ladner.


Plante had to have a good backstory so the bikers knew he had enough money to cover his expensive rides — the Harley and a tricked-out Mustang with a pearl-black paint job, in which police installed high-tech listening devices and even a camera in the trunk to film drug deals.


The Hells Angels believed Plante made his cash as a drug dealer, selling steroids, cocaine and methamphetamine. He certainly had appeared to be connected in the previous few months, helping full-patch Angels get their hands on precursors and meth cooks.


Part way into the operation he and the RCMP had conflicts over procedures which Plante thought were putting his life unnecessarily in danger and he threatened to quit.


Plante was ready to quit. He threatened to punch Shinkaruk. But Plante knew extricating himself would be difficult. Police had eight kilos of meth that Potts had given him. Plante was supposed to pay Potts back $160,000 after a pretend sale.


“I am thinking, ‘If I leave, I can’t even just go back to my normal life,’” Plante recalled.


Finally, police and the agent had a sit-down.


“I said, ‘Listen, we can’t do it this way. This ain’t going to work … If they tell me I got to be at the clubhouse at 9 — I can’t be late,’” Plante said. “‘But you are making me meet you here to pick up a wire.’”


Procedures were adapted as the investigation went along. Some of Plante’s debriefs started happening over the phone. The handlers began leaving the wires in one of his vehicles so he didn’t have to retrieve them each time.


On June 19, 2004, sitting in the New Westminster safe house, Plante signed a second agreement — this one promising him up to $1 million. It said he would get $500,000 at the conclusion of the investigative phase of E-Pandora. Then he’d get another $500,000 at the end of the legal proceedings. Little did he know that would be many years away.


His monthly stipend, which was separate from the award money, was set at $4,000, raised to $5,000 in September 2004 and bumped to $14,000 for the final three months he was undercover.


The strain on Plante was enormous, Shinkaruk said recently.


“The guy was under immense pressure all the time. He was in constant danger,” Shinkaruk said. “I have a lot of respect for him. He is a very brave individual.”


Plante describes several close calls when the wire he was wearing was in danger of being discovered and how he was becoming spooked every time one of the HA began to talk about wires.
  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#23 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:50 PM

In part four, Plante describes what it was like when he was finally accepted into the Hells Angels program as an "official friend" and how difficult the final months of his dangerous assignment became.
http://www.insidetheangels.com/


Unaware that police agent Micheal Plante was secretly collecting evidence implicating them in drug deals, extortions, and other crimes, the Hells Angels finally accepted him into their fold as an “official friend” in September 2004.


Plante was called into the weekly “church” meeting at the East End clubhouse by David (Gyrator) Giles.


“They are all looking at me. And they say: ‘Tell us why you want to be a Hells Angel,’” Plante recalled.


“I did my speech — ‘Well you know, I have been hanging around you guys. I like the camaraderie. I like what is going on around here. And I really, really want to be part of it. And I want to be part of the bigger thing.’”


Giles asked him about the fact he had studied criminology and told him he’d never be able to pursue the field again.


East End president John Bryce laid out how police would react to Plante now that he was in the program.


“Bryce said something like, ‘You are going to have a lot of heat on you now because they like to pick on us,’” Plante recalled.


Giles made a final joking comment, all captured on the wire Plante was wearing: “You are not going to, like, become a Hells Angel and then quit and write a book about us, are you?”


Plante had his photo taken with the East End chapter to commemorate the event. That photo would be circulated to all Hells Angels in Western Canada to see if any objected to the new East End recruit being part of the notorious gang.


“They gave me a pamphlet from the world headquarters of Hells Angels, right? You read it and then they took it away,” Plante said.


And Plante was detailed by the HA to go pick up and move the weapons arsenal of the East End Chapter. He then turned them over to police but it might be dicey to explain where the weapons had gone so the police made it look like a raid on the new stoarge place.


“I thought I was picking up a couple of pistols. I didn’t know this was the East End arsenal. I always thought it was a myth,” Plante said.


When he arrived at the trailer, Potts’s stepfather saw the bag and wondered if it would be big enough.


“I go, ‘What?! How many guns do you got here?’ So we go to the back of the trailer and he opens this thing and starts pulling out machine guns and other stuff. He says, ‘Be careful, this one has got grenades.’”


Plante couldn’t believe the nonchalance of the senior citizen. He immediately called police.


“I said, ‘You are not going to believe this. I have got the whole arsenal.’”


Of course, police took the guns, which put Plante in a difficult position. For weeks afterwards, John Punko asked about the guns, saying he wanted to go out and shoot targets.


Plante and police worked up a series of excuses he could give to Punko about why he couldn’t get the guns.


“One scenario was that I got them stashed in this guy’s house and he is a long-haul driver and I don’t got the key,” Plante said. “There was one time when me and Punko were driving out to a meeting in Haney and Punko wanted to go try out a couple of those grenades.”


Plante said he thought they might blow up prematurely because they had got wet.


Both police and Plante knew he couldn’t keep up his ruse with the Angels much longer. Sooner or later, others besides Punko would confront him about the guns.


“Yes, it was getting dicey,” said Det. Brad Stephen. “And that’s when you love it. That’s where the risk is.”


Police settled on a scenario to cover the missing guns. They rented a storage locker in Abbotsford, then bought a gun locker to put inside it. They left the gun locker open, with Stephen’s business card on top.


If Potts wanted the guns, Plante was to take him to Abbotsford, then act shocked when it looked like police had raided the locker.


Plante was given a severe beating by members of the UN Gang at a Vancouver nightclub and he seriously thought about just quitting. He disappeared with no contact with his police handlers or the HA.


“The cops didn’t know where I was … The Hells Angels didn’t know where I was. They couldn’t believe I didn’t show up for church. So they are looking for me.”


He eventually went to the safe house to talk to police. They offered to increase his monthly stipend to $14,000. Plante said that was the one time during the operation that money was his primary incentive. He stayed.



But first, he had to explain himself to the Angels, and even apologize to senior Nomad Gino Zumpano because the fight happened in the club he ran. He also had to explain his disappearance to his fellow Angels.


“I had to go and eat crap for the next month – I had to go talk to everyone. I had to get yelled at by Louie (Robinson),” he said. “I had to go stand in the clubhouse, in front of every East End guy and tell my story.”


After it all, the Hells Angels told Plante and Potts to “take care of the guy that I had the problem with. We were supposed to get rid of him, like kill him,” Plante said.


However all the stress was becoming too much and Plante told police he was through.


“Plus I had big arguments with the cops that week. We are butting heads. My anxiety was through the roof. I said, ‘I am done.’”


Even though Plante had threatened to quit before, this time the police believed him.


  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#24 Rypien37

Rypien37

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,514 posts
  • Joined: 26-March 07

Posted 30 January 2013 - 03:51 PM

Good reads. Thanks Wetcoaster.
  • 0
Posted Image

R.I.P. Your heart and fearlessness will be remembered


#25 Buddhas Hand

Buddhas Hand

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,854 posts
  • Joined: 19-December 11

Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:33 PM

A SNAPSHOT OF POLICE CORRUPTION IN CANADA
Vancouver - Vancouver police Chief Jamie Graham fired two officers on Jan. 28 for beating up three people in Stanley Park and suspended four others without pay. The provincial government's police complaints commission is also investigating 59 allegations against members of the VPD made by the Pivot Legal Society. The complaints include torture, illegal search and seizure, use of excessive force and 'starlight tours,' in which officers drive people out of the Downtown Eastside and dump them.

WINDSOR - A 'sickened' Chief Glenn Stannard described it as 'the darkest day of my career as chief' when staff informed him in early December 2003 that a Windsor police department vehicle had been used to ferry stolen property away from a burglarized home-and-garden business.
property, break, enter and theft, breach of trust and public mischief.



Sounds like they could be talking about the hells angels , except these are the people your society employs and trusts to enforce the the LAW

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
  • 0

The Real war is not between the east and the west. The real war is between intelligent and stupid people.

Marjane Satrapi

tony-abbott-and-stephen-harper-custom-da

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.

Aldous Huxley.


#26 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:36 AM

In Part Five, Plante talks about the challenge of preparing for a series of trials and how he felt when it was all over.
http://www.insidethe...notorious-gang/

Once Plante was pulled out he was put up in a safe house under guard and then a vacation in Mexico with RCMP security. On the vacation he had a breakdown on the third day and spent the time in his hotel room. After the vacation he was relocated to an unspecified city in North America so HA could not track him down. The problem was he had no social connections and no support network. He was being prepped for various trials and then shuttled to Vancouver to testify in the various trials that were the outcome of his infiltration.

He couldn’t return to B.C., where the Hells Angels members he had betrayed could find him. So he was plunked down in another city in North America where no one knew his history.


Police set him up in an apartment. They stayed in another suite in the same building for almost two months, taking him to various court cases so he could see what to expect when his own time came to testify.


He would be the key Crown witness in a series of trials of Hells Angels and associates charged as a result of the evidence he had collected in 2004 and 2005 as part of E-Pandora, the undercover investigation targeting the East End chapter.


“They weren’t really keeping an eye on me. They were helping me,” he said.


But then Plante’s police friends returned to Vancouver.


“My anxiety went way up. I just had a major meltdown. They just left me there. I didn’t have any friends. I didn’t know anybody. I am kind of like — the fog is lifting from my head and I am thinking what the f–k did I just do?” he recalled.

“All of a sudden you don’t have an identity. You don’t have anything. You have a pile of money.


Plante had collected the first $500,000 of a $1-million contract he had signed the previous year for his work on the unprecedented investigation. Police were still looking after Plante’s expenses. He was in the process of changing his identity.


He said he was like a lottery winner who blew a lot of his award money.


“I went on a spending spree. I really didn’t know how to handle myself,” he said. “All of a sudden I have no friends. I have a half a million dollars. I have nothing but time on my hands. You know what I mean? I did stupid things — just stupid things for about a year.”


He had been playing the tough-guy role for so long that he didn’t really know how to be normal. “I still had this Hells Angels crap inside me. I had been a Hells Angel for almost four years. I was used to going to the bars and nightclubs and spending money and yelling.”


After he disappeared the HA searched for him and the weapons arsenal he had turned over to police. He was the subject of a HA manhunt. Six months after he was pulled out the enforcement action began.

Six months after Plante had disappeared, the results of his work with the police came to fruition.


The busts went down on July 15, 2005, a sunny Friday afternoon. (View more images of what police found in the raid and the aftermath.) Police arrested 18 Hells Angels and associates and raided the clubhouse where Plante had spent so much time.


[media][media]

Crown counsel began prepping him to appear as a witness and this went on for many months.

And once in court the issue of Pante's own criminal conduct became a central and preliminary question. The accused HA claimed that Plante was the one behind the criminal activities. How that claim was decided would be crucial and the trial judeudge sided with Plante and the Crown.


In fact, they accused Plante of being the real criminal who engaged in drug trafficking and acts of violence as he infiltrated the East End chapter. Plante was not ready for the attacks.


“I show up for court and they are making me look like an asshole. I was like, ‘What? Are you serious? What’s going on here?’” Plante said. “The court was tough.”


But he held his own on the stand. He explained that he was doing a job for police, in which he had to convince the Hells Angels he was a tough enforcer and that he could help them with their drug deals. How else could he be accepted?


It was an act, by an actor with a major role, he said.



On March 16, 2007, Justice Victor Curtis ruled the evidence would stand and that Plante’s conduct was not illegal because of exemptions in the Criminal Code that cover investigations like E-Pandora.


“I find nothing in the circumstances of this investigation which is not in accord with the community sense of fundamental justice, nothing which offends the principles of fundamental justice, and therefore no abuse of process constituting a breach of the rights of Mr. Lising or Mr. Ghavami,” Curtis said.


It was a key victory in the E-Pandora case and subsequent prosecutions, federal Crown Martha Devlin said recently.


Plante would testify in a series of cases and it seems that defence counsel made a strategic miscalculation, thinking Plante was nothing more than thug and forgetting that he had played a difficult role to infiltrate the HA to gather evidence. While there were individual convictions, Crown did not get the conviction it was seeking declaring Hells Angels to be a criminal organization.


The biggest case Plante testified in was the jury trial of four full-patch Angels — his old friend Potts, Lising, John Punko and Jean Violette. They faced a range of charges, from extortion and assault to firearms and explosives possession. But the biggest charge was that they were part of a criminal organization: the Hells Angels.


potts lising punko violette with caption


Plante was on the stand for months, mostly under gruelling cross-examination.


Vancouver Police Det. Stephen, one of Plante’s handlers during Pandora, said the agent was a solid witness throughout the court cases.


“He did very well in court. They didn’t see him coming. All the high-end lawyers in there didn’t anticipate he would have the memory he had,” Stephen said. “They made a fatal mistake in assuming this guy is just a dumb thug. He was a star in the box. In the end, they didn’t know how to deal with him.”


When the jury came back, all four bikers were convicted on a series of charges. But they were all acquitted on the criminal organization count — a blow to both police and Crown.


Plante was disappointed too.


“Without a doubt they are a criminal organization,” he said.


Shinkaruk agrees. “The Hells Angels are a criminal organization. They are an international criminal organization and the British Columbia Hells Angels for a number of years have been held in high esteem internationally by Hells Angels,” he said.


And in the end? His motivation and what his life has now become?


Plante doesn’t consider the money a huge windfall given that he has spent 10 years of his life waiting for E-Pandora to conclude. “I have actually got 40 years of my life left.”


He never undertook his amazing journey for money, but because he thought it was the right thing to do.


“I am proud of what I did. I have no regrets about what I did.”


And while he is not planning on living in fear for the rest of his life, he has to take special security measures because of the damage he did to the Hells Angels.


“Are they dangerous? For sure they are dangerous. If I was in Brazil and all of a sudden I ran into some Brazilian Hells Angels, for sure they are going to know who I am. I knew who guys were. We had pictures of guys in the clubhouse,” he said.


“But I really haven’t looked over my shoulder. I live the way I have always lived — I kind of scope things. But I don’t let it get to me.


“I am not saying I am this super-strong, super-crazy guy. I am realistic. If it did happen, it happens. But I don’t put myself in harm’s way. I don’t go to Vancouver. I really don’t say anything about it. It’s done, and what’s done is done.”


Plante has already moved on. Just as he had to do so many times as a child, he has adapted to a new city, new friends and a new life.


“I had no problem moving on. I am doing my own thing. I am pretty easygoing when it comes to stuff like that,” he said. “I just want to live my life and enjoy my life like a normal person. I don’t have any regrets. I don’t look back. I look forward.”


  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#27 Mr. Shakermaker

Mr. Shakermaker

    Canucks Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,321 posts
  • Joined: 08-May 04

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:01 PM

I personally know a few hells angels members on the island, they are actually pretty nice guys. Sure they do illegal crap, but they don't hurt anyone that isn't trying to frack them around. Maybe the Island is a little more lax even for the HA.


except for deal drugs and kill people
  • 0
Posted Image

#28 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 01 February 2013 - 01:29 PM

Plante sounds like ever more of a tool with each additional to the series, and the HA sound like they're getting increasingly sloppy about who they allow into the club.

Granted, with the way the HA operate where a few key members make most of the money, and there are limited opportunities for advancement compared to a lot of criminal organizations, they're not going to attact the talent they once did.

Once the old school guys who built the club in this region are gone, they'll be in trouble.
  • 0
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas

#29 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 01 February 2013 - 01:51 PM

Plante sounds like ever more of a tool with each additional to the series, and the HA sound like they're getting increasingly sloppy about who they allow into the club.

Granted, with the way the HA operate where a few key members make most of the money, and there are limited opportunities for advancement compared to a lot of criminal organizations, they're not going to attact the talent they once did.

Once the old school guys who built the club in this region are gone, they'll be in trouble.

They are already in trouble as Part Six of the feature points out. In part six, the RCMP’s top cop — Commissioner Bob Paulson reflects on his role as a leader of the E-Pandora investigation and its significance in taking on the Hells Angels in B.C.
http://www.insidethe...o-angels-power/


East End club decimated


Vancouver Det. Brad Stephen, one of Plante’s handlers throughout E-Pandora, said the investigation was a critical turning point for the East End chapter.


“East End has never been the same. East End was at that time the most powerful chapter in Canada. And now they are absolutely decimated,” he said. “The clubhouse is falling apart. Most of the members are well into their 50s and 60s.”


Membership has fallen from 21 in 2004 to just nine today, though some former East End members have transferred to the Nomads and Kelowna chapters.


There are no prospects or hangarounds waiting in the wings to become full-patch East End members.


RCMP Insp. Gary Shinkaruk, who oversaw Plante’s mission, said that at one point in B.C., the Hells Angels’ patch was “a criminal gold card” that signified undying loyalty among members and generated so much public terror that no one would help police fight them.


That isn’t the case anymore.


“Certainly if you look at the East End specifically, they were viewed as one of the elite chapters,” Shinkaruk said. “Now if you look at them in 2012, they are a broken-down chapter. We have certainly disrupted where they sit in the pecking order of criminal organizations.”


Both the Kelowna and the Burnaby-based Nomads’ chapters were also affected by Pandora, Shinkaruk said.


“You look at a number of senior influential Hells Angels who have quit the club – the infighting within those clubs and those members. They steal from one another. They talk about one another. There isn’t really the loyalty that they purport to have.”


As Paulson points out the myth of the invulnerable Hells Angels has been exposed. He also says he has great respect for what Plante did as an agent.


RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson, who as an inspector led the B.C. investigation dubbed E-Pandora, said the case rattled the Hells Angels and destroyed their illusion of impenetrability.


Twelve Hells Angels and associates were convicted in E-Pandora, in which police agent Micheal Plante infiltrated the End End chapter and collected evidence of their crimes for months.


The investigation also showed police that “these guys could be gotten,” Paulson said.


“There had been other efforts to get them — you get one here and you get one there. And so, by using the agent approach, it had a couple of effects. It got us a lot of evidence. It also destabilized them and it sort of made everybody look around the corner a little bit more and have less confidence in their ability to operate outside of the law with that confidence in their solidarity.”


Since Pandora, which formally ended Oct. 30, 2012 when a final charge was stayed, the Hells Angels’ power has waned.


“They’re vulnerable,” Paulson said. “And I think many of the experiences across Canada have demonstrated that. Really, this idea that ‘We’re solid bad guys sticking together,’ the biker version of omerta, is a bit of an illusion.”


Paulson praised Plante for the risky and valuable work he did on the investigation.


“I have got a lot of respect for him, for what he did and how he did it,” Paulson said. “It was very stressful for him. It was very dangerous for him.”


His only regret is that Plante couldn’t have stayed undercover a little longer, but he recognizes “there was an awful lot of pressure on Mike.


“There was an awful lot of pressure on the team,” he added. “We were getting an awful lot of evidence.”


The biggest dilemma during the E-Pandora operation says Paulson was allowing drug deals to go down and drugs get onto the street and the judge noted this as well.


Paulson said it was tough for police to allow drug transactions to be completed, but it was the only way to prove the bigger conspiracies involving several bikers.


“It did pay off in court. It demonstrated the resolve and the capability of the police to convince the courts that this was an honourable strategy to track those transactions to allow under certain conditions drugs to remain in circulation while we demonstrated advancement in the evidence chain,” he said.


“It is a tough idea to explain to people that don’t take the time to dive into the issues. Allowing drugs to remain in circulation while the police are there looking at them — it is almost counterintuitive. It’s hard to overlook that. That’s why I think this documenting and fairly onerous logistical element to the evidence collection was so vital there.”


B.C. Supreme Court Justice Victor Curtis commented on the dilemma in his watershed ruling upholding the police tactics in E-Pandora.


“Large quantities of drugs were released into the community – drugs which could cause death or serious injury in their consumption and trafficking,” Curtis said.


“However, significant quantities of drugs were removed from the community during the investigation and it would appear that the investigation, by reasonable inference, has seriously disrupted and prevented the distribution of much larger quantities of drugs.”


The biggest regret Paulson has is that unlike the courts in Ontario and Quebec the Hells Angels were not declared to be a criminal organization but that battle continues in the BC courts as well as the BC government making use of the civil forfeiture laws to seize HA property.


In B.C., the Hells Angels have been hit particularly hard. There are several continuing prosecutions, including another attempt to get the Hells Angels declared a criminal organization.


In that case, Kelowna chapter vice-president David Giles — formerly a member of the targeted East End chapter — and sergeant-at-arms Bryan Oldham, as well as several associates, are facing a series of charges, including conspiracy to traffic cocaine and committing crimes for the Hells Angels as a criminal organization.


Two other Kelowna chapter members — Norman Cocks and Robert Thomas — and five associates are facing second-degree murder charges in the June 2011 beating death of Okanagan man Dain Phillips.


Both Cocks and Thomas were also in the East End chapter when Plante infiltrated the Hells Angels. And high-profile B.C. HA member Larry Amero, who is part of the new West Point chapter, is facing cocaine conspiracy charges in Quebec.


There are also several civil forfeiture cases against the Hells Angels in this province. B.C.’s director of civil forfeiture wants to seize both the East End and Kelowna clubhouses, worth more than $1.2 million in total, because of their connections to criminal activity.


In the last two weeks alone, the director has filed two more cases in B.C. Supreme Court against men convicted in E-Pandora, in an attempt to keep more than $245,000 seized by police during the investigation.


And the Hells Angels have yet to go to trial against the director to challenge the government’s 2007 seizure of the Nanaimo clubhouse.


Giles and Kelowna member Hans Frederick Kurth are also battling the Canada Revenue Agency, which claims they owe back taxes.


There are also allegations in several Washington state drug cases that B.C. Hells Angels are behind cross-border cocaine and marijuana .

smuggling.


  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#30 Electro Rock

Electro Rock

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,633 posts
  • Joined: 17-March 04

Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:08 PM

I think the police are overstating their success here, the EE chapter was on the verge of fading away regardless because of the age of its key members and their moving on to other things. I think they have too many chapters for the size of this region anyway.
  • 0
"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

Norman Thomas




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Canucks.com is the official Web site of The Vancouver Canucks. The Vancouver Canucks and Canucks.com are trademarks of The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership.  NHL and the word mark and image of the Stanley Cup are registered trademarks and the NHL Shield and NHL Conference logos are trademarks of the National Hockey League. All NHL logos and marks and NHL team logos and marks as well as all other proprietary materials depicted herein are the property of the NHL and the respective NHL teams and may not be reproduced without the prior written consent of NHL Enterprises, L.P.  Copyright © 2009 The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership and the National Hockey League.  All Rights Reserved.