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#31 BananaMash

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:47 AM

My Great-Grandfather was at Vimmy Ridge, he was a fortuneate survivor out of far too many who had to lose their lives to help protect our freedoms. R.I.P. To those who payed to ultimate sacrifice for their country, so that we could continue to live in a safe and peaceful nation. Lest We Forget.

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#32 hockeyville88

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:52 AM

The most brave and honourable thing a person can do is serve their country. Not every person serves in combat but every member of the Armed Forces contributes valiantly to protecting the rights and freedoms that we sometimes take for granted.

To all those who have served in the past - thank you
To all those who are serving now - thank you and come home safe
To all those who have lost their lives in service of their countries - RIP

LEST WE FORGET 11-11-11
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#33 Buggernut

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:56 AM

Thank you Vets for giving your lives for this country. Your sacrifice will never be forgotten.

THIS country??? Are we talking the vets from the war of 1812 here?

AFAIK, Hitler never sent troops across the ocean to attack us here. Full marks to our boys for going over to Europe to fight and stop an evil megalomaniac dictator from spreading his horizons, but the Europeans should really have stood up for themselves.

#34 Scottish⑦Canuck

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:02 PM

THIS country??? Are we talking the vets from the war of 1812 here?

AFAIK, Hitler never sent troops across the ocean to attack us here. Full marks to our boys for going over to Europe to fight and stop an evil megalomaniac dictator from spreading his horizons, but the Europeans should really have stood up for themselves.


Unbelievable.

#35 canucks.bradley

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:08 PM

thank you for your sacrifice, and may it never be forgotten.

lest we forget.
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K guys I nd hlp fast. Im @ a girls I rly like & txtng from my iphone. I did a #2 in the bathroom and it plugged, water is almost overflowing toilet. Srsly I dunno wut 2 do somebody help!


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#36 BananaMash

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:08 PM

THIS country??? Are we talking the vets from the war of 1812 here?

AFAIK, Hitler never sent troops across the ocean to attack us here. Full marks to our boys for going over to Europe to fight and stop an evil megalomaniac dictator from spreading his horizons, but the Europeans should really have stood up for themselves.


Stop being such an asshole, and honor our troops.

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#37 Buggernut

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:10 PM

Unbelievable.

It may seem like an inappropriate time and place for it, but I feel this misconception just has to be cleared.

I would really prefer our troops to have stayed home safe and sound until something started brewing in our neighbourhood. (Isn't that a commonly expressed sentiment when it comes to wars in Iraq, Libya, etc.?)

#38 Wetcoaster

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:12 PM

From today's Province - the story of British Staff Sgt John Rhys, a British soldier who was raised in pre-war Berlin and would later emigrate to Canada (Vancouver) and his trip into Hitler's bunker.

Inside Hitler's underground lair
BY KENT SPENCER

Surly Russian guards scowled as British Staff-Sgt. John Rhys started down a long flight of steps shortly after Adolf Hitler’s suicide in 1945. It was the quickest way into the Fuehrer’s underground bunker where he had met his end two months before. Rhys, a 22-year-old British soldier, was among the first Westerners allowed to enter the dictator’s lair following the end of the Second World War.

Now 88 and living in a Metro Vancouver care centre, Rhys has come forward for the first time to tell us of his wartime experiences and what he found among a pile of junk in Hitler’s study.

“Berlin was a shambles. Broken fixtures and furniture were everywhere, covered by splintered glass,” says Rhys, a retired accountant, in his unpublished memoirs.

Rhys, who was a British subject, ended up in the heart of Nazi Germany on the Allied Control Commission because he had been raised in prewar Berlin and spoke fluent German.

He was thus uniquely qualified to suss out hiding places among the ruins, locate some rare Nazi artifacts and spirit them away from ever-watchful Russian sentries.

The wealth of material he gathered tells its own story of the infamous Third Reich.

Eerie sights

As a child, Rhys played in the magnificent Tiergarten Park in central Berlin, feeding seeds to a crowd of chickadees. But the mood turned dark in the Depression-ravaged 1930s. One time he was punched out by a group of “loutish youths” who also stomped on a cap given to him for Christmas.

By July, 1945, Rhys hardly recognized the city. Hungry people wandered amid the rubble and Rhys was needed to guide the Allies around the city.

One day he joined a group of Americans descending into the bunker, which had been kept dark since Hitler’s death.

Diesel-driven ventilators were silent, so Rhys’ candles cast eerie shadows on the walls.

The air had a pungent odour, the result of pitch from torches used by the Russians, whose army was first into the city.

Hitler’s lounge, where he and wife Eva Braun committed suicide, was right where the map said it should be, at the foot of the exit stairs.

Even though weeks had passed since their joint suicide, no one had bothered to remove the blood-stained furniture. Rhys noticed his “velvet sofa and carpet,” but was unimpressed.

“It was just a job to be done at the time,” he says.

A broken Berlin

During his travels through the broken masonry, Rhys took a trip several blocks away to the apartment where his family had left everything behind five days before the war. He says the destruction was “awesome.”

The once-beautifully treed Tiergarten had been cut down for fuel and turned into a “moonscape” by explosions. Many of the zoo’s animals were dead.

Hungry Berliners scavenged for food and used hand-drawn carts to pull their worldly belongings.

German women faked serious skin diseases to reduce the chances of being sexually assaulted by Russian troops bent on vengeance. He says people tried to gain sympathy in job interviews by forging concentration camp-type tattoos on their wrists.

Albert Speer’s architectural marvel was a building in the government district called the new Reich Chancellery.

It combined Hitler’s official residence with grand halls as big as anything in Europe.

Inside Hitler’s extra-large study, Rhys says his safe was still unopened.

The Fuhrer’s bedroom was tiny by comparison, measuring just 12 square feet.

Rummaging around the piles of soggy debris — the roof was open to the rain — Rhys spotted two undamaged boxes lying on shelves.

“I was thrilled to find several dry boxes,” he says. “There was a gilded dinner guest invitation from Hitler and table seating cards for state banquets.”

Two important finds lay among the badges, plaques and SS epaulettes.

One was an Iron Cross, First Class, accompanied by an award certificate signed by Hitler himself.

Another signed certificate and medal with a winged eagle was to be given for exemplary public service.

Hitler, who was last photographed handing out medals to teary-eyed youngsters above the bunker just days before his death, hadn’t lived long enough to present either commendation.

Rhys says he immediately realized the items had historical significance and were keepers.

But the problem was the Russians, who were everywhere at that time.

“I tucked all the memorabilia into my uniform tunic, which made me look quite portly,” he says.

With the guards none the wiser, Rhys and his artifacts slipped out, eventually making their way to Vancouver.

Mini-history of the Reich

Rhys’s collection (see the photo gallery) is a mini-history of the Armed Forces in the Third Reich.

Many of the items are tiny three-dimensional models of planes, tanks, eagles and swastikas. Some are mounted as badges or put on pins.

There is a Luftwaffe pilot’s wings, a tank commander’s badge and purple heart-type medals for combat injuries.

A couple of SS shoulder badges worn by Hitler’s personal guards came from the bunker itself as those near him desperately tore away any association with the dead man.

Rhys’ son Brian says the collection will remain in the family’s possession safely locked away in a bank vault.

“As time passed, the significance of the events has become clearer,” says Rhys’ other son David. “We wanted to celebrate dad’s service and contribution. There is no plans to sell the artifacts or for them to leave the family, but it’s possible they could be loaned to a museum in the future.”

Few sights are as chilling as the signature of the man who sent millions to their deaths.

Mark Jackson, manager at the Command Post military store in Victoria, says Hitler’s signature changed five or six times over the years.

At the end, it was little more than a squiggle on a sheet of paper.

“His last signature was a scrawl because he was an absolute mess,” says Jackson.

Simon Offord, archivist at the Imperial War Museum in London, England, says Rhys’ artifacts are “quite rare.”

But he says the signature on them could be just a machine-generated copy because 300,000 Iron Crosses were given out during the war. “Hitler wouldn’t be able to sign them all,” says Offord.

“It is possible, however, that he may have personally signed these particular certificates, which would indeed make them quite valuable,” says Offord.

Brian Rhys says the family was curious about the signature and showed it to a friend who had once been a handwriting expert for the RCMP. He says the friend authenticated the signature as an original.

Jackson says collectors of German war memorabilia are not usually looking to glorify the Nazi’s war crimes, but indulging in a fascination for the Germans’ well-recognized military prowess.

“The German collectibles market is the biggest in the world. A lot of German designers were very artistic and their badges have a lot of effort put into them. The Iron Crosses were always made of silver and iron even during the last month of the war,” he says.

A document with a facsimile of Hitler signature is worth up to $300; Iron Crosses can go for $500.

He estimates Rhys’ items are likely worth a few thousand dollars.

Artifacts a remarkable story

Mark Zuehlke, who has written extensively about the Canadian Army’s wartime exploits, says Rhys’ story is quite remarkable.

“It is incredibly unique that these artifacts should have fallen into Rhys’ hands,” he says.

“The Russians were incredibly security conscious. They would not willingly have shared anything like these artifacts,” says Zuehlke.

After the war, Rhys moved to Vancouver, where he met his British-born wife Pat. They raised two boys and he worked as an auditor for B.C. Telephone for 38 years.

Rhys’s memoirs have been written in a matter-of-fact tone from the hand of a man accustomed to dealing with dry facts and observations.

Few emotions are expressed — and Rhys’ memory is failing so much today that he is unable to add to the written record.

But his son Brian says he will show him a copy of The Province story on Remembrance Day.

“It’s the first thing I’ll do,” he says.

http://www.theprovin...l#ixzz1dQRbQ0fa

Photo galleries:

Artifacts from Adolf Hitler's bunker
http://www.theprovin...2286/story.html

Photos: Soldier John Rhys
http://www.theprovin...1805/story.html

Edited by Wetcoaster, 11 November 2011 - 02:36 PM.

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#39 Owen Nolan

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:15 PM

It may seem like an inappropriate time and place for it, but I feel this misconception just has to be cleared.

I would really prefer our troops to have stayed home safe and sound until something started brewing in our neighbourhood. (Isn't that a commonly expressed sentiment when it comes to wars in Iraq, Libya, etc.?)


No one really cares what you prefer... This is a remembrance thread, so take your own advice and shut it...

"As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them."

Lest we forget!
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#40 G.K. Chesterton

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:21 PM

"Courage is almost a contradiction in terms. It means a strong desire to live taking the form of a readiness to die." - G.K. Chesterton

Lest we forget.

Edited by blister soul, 11 November 2011 - 12:22 PM.

“Reason is itself a matter of faith. It is an act of faith to assert that our thoughts have any relation to reality at all.” - G.K. Chesterton

“Unbelief is as much of a choice as belief is. What makes it in many ways more appealing is that whereas to believe in something requires some measure of understanding and effort, not to believe doesn't require much of anything at all.” - Frederick Buechner

“All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful.” - Flannery O'Connor


“My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I got this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust?” - C.S. Lewis

#41 Scottish⑦Canuck

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:26 PM

It may seem like an inappropriate time and place for it, but I feel this misconception just has to be cleared.

I would really prefer our troops to have stayed home safe and sound until something started brewing in our neighbourhood. (Isn't that a commonly expressed sentiment when it comes to wars in Iraq, Libya, etc.?)


Yeah, but you're showing ignorance. You make it sound like it would have been a simple thing for Europeans to sort it out on their own. Germany was the equivalent of a superpower back then. Do you really think that countries with vastly inferior resources and militaries could simply keep them at bay. Just like that? Germany was driven by a madman intent on world domination. It wasn't as simple as "leaving them to get on with it."

Anyway, I'm not going to get into a debate in here, as that's not the purpose of the thread. You should also think of that before you post.

#42 canucks.bradley

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:32 PM

I would really prefer our troops to have stayed home safe and sound until something started brewing in our neighbourhood. (Isn't that a commonly expressed sentiment when it comes to wars in Iraq, Libya, etc.?)


if we had waited and stayed home safe and sound until something was brewing in our neighbourhood, then you would have had to wait unit Germany landed on the shores of North America. This means they would have conquered Europe...meaning we would not be having this discussion right now, there would be no freedom of speech, national hockey league, and our world might be in shambles.

im not a history buff but if England fell..Germany would have been able to direct their attention to USSR and had they gotten that...it would have been all over.
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K guys I nd hlp fast. Im @ a girls I rly like & txtng from my iphone. I did a #2 in the bathroom and it plugged, water is almost overflowing toilet. Srsly I dunno wut 2 do somebody help!


Watch Bowness somehow mess up Tampa Bay's already amazing 2 powerplay units...he'll probably tell Stamkos to do drop passes from centre ice, take him out from the faceoff dot, and place him infront of the goalie :lol:


#43 VANVAN604

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:32 PM

I think we should all ignore Buggernut in this thread.

Although, I like everyone else have a lot of choice words for his ignorance, I'm sure thats the rise he/she would want out us.

#44 Buggernut

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:41 PM

if we had waited and stayed home safe and sound until something was brewing in our neighbourhood, then you would have had to wait unit Germany landed on the shores of North America. This means they would have conquered Europe...meaning we would not be having this discussion right now, there would be no freedom of speech, national hockey league, and our world might be in shambles.

im not a history buff but if England fell..Germany would have been able to direct their attention to USSR and had they gotten that...it would have been all over.

Or they would eventually come to their senses, and the system would have collapsed and a revolt would have taken place from within, or so I would hope. I really don't see it enduring for 70 years.

Anyways, sorry for sidetracking. Yes, it's about honouring the troops and remembering their sacrifices. It just irks me when the term "died for his country" is thrown around loosely, and often incorrectly.

Edited by Buggernut, 11 November 2011 - 12:43 PM.


#45 Coda

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 04:22 PM

THIS country??? Are we talking the vets from the war of 1812 here?

AFAIK, Hitler never sent troops across the ocean to attack us here. Full marks to our boys for going over to Europe to fight and stop an evil megalomaniac dictator from spreading his horizons, but the Europeans should really have stood up for themselves.


If it wasn't for Canadian and later American participation in a foreign war, the war in Europe would have gone on for many many more years, and Hitler may very well have been able to take over the entire continent. I'm against War, but sometimes military action prevents even worse atrocities.

Would you also have been against military intervention in Rwanda and Darfur to prevent Genocide? I mean, those Africans "really should have stood up for themselves".

#46 Wetcoaster

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 04:32 PM

Per the originating post:



NOTE - this thread is not intended to be a debate about war and peace... if you wish to debate that then start a new thread. This thread is dedicated to those who gave their lives in the service of our country.

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#47 Vapourstreak

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:58 AM

Thank you.

#48 John316

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:02 PM

Thank you all brave Vets that fought for our freedom!

#49 Wetcoaster

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:30 PM

Some links:

We Remember (video)
http://www.vancouver...vFZ8rXzEzAqhZJa

Remembrance Day November 11 201, Vancouver - Victory Square Cenotaph (video)
http://www.vancouver...Qq0xqbXYrHNgzUW

Members of the Russian navy lay a wreath in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Victory Square cenotaph on Friday.
http://www.vancouver...l#ixzz1dWqNsaPc

Vancouver Province links to articles, photo galleries and videos
http://www.theprovin...-day/index.html
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#50 Zippgunn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 04:21 PM

I especially remember the vets like the Sikh WW2 vets who were told to remove their "hats" in the Legion awhile back in Surrey IIRC or the Chinese Canadians and Japanese Canadians that fought for the country that discriminated against them so harshly. These people deserve special respect in my book. I don't wear a poppy because of the Surrey incident and have been accosted several times by poppy vendors but when I tell them why they clam up fast. Pity we lost WW2; we were fighting fascism (and racism), remember?
Don't talk about it... Do it!!!

#51 Wetcoaster

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:12 PM

I especially remember the vets like the Sikh WW2 vets who were told to remove their "hats" in the Legion awhile back in Surrey IIRC or the Chinese Canadians and Japanese Canadians that fought for the country that discriminated against them so harshly. These people deserve special respect in my book. I don't wear a poppy because of the Surrey incident and have been accosted several times by poppy vendors but when I tell them why they clam up fast. Pity we lost WW2; we were fighting fascism (and racism), remember?

My father was a veteran (Korean War) and held office in the Royal Canadian Legion in his local branch and provincially. After the incident with the Sikh turbans being classified as headgear he pushed hard for apologies and clarification of the policy. When they were not forthcoming he resigned in disgust and has had nothing further to do with the Legion.
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#52 canucksfan123456

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:15 PM

I'm a day late but a big thank you to all these heros, past and present, who have put their lives on the line.


#53 nucklehead

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:20 PM

http://www.kamloopsn...-old-friendship

Nice article about two old WW2 friends septerated for 66 years reunited through Skype.

Destructive, divisive and deadly it is, yet the bittersweet irony of war is that it can form the most enduring of human bonds.

Dick Reimer and Alfred White, two Second World War privates in the New Westminster Regiment, Fifth Division, would agree.

They grew to be the best of friends as young regimental comrades fighting in the trenches of Europe, but when the smoke of war cleared, Pte. Dick Reimer lost track of Pte. Alfred White.

Sixty-six years later, through Skyping, a technology that was unthinkable when they parted company, the pair was reunited.

“I saw him on TV and he saw me,” Reimer, 86, recalled in his suite at Berwick on the Park.

“When I saw Alfie, tears started coming to both cheeks, not realizing you would meet a friend you fought with during the war,” he said.

The remarkable reunion of Reimer and White — now in his ’90s and residing on the veteran’s ward of Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital — took place earlier this year.

Karen Reimer, Dick’s daughter-in-law, had to do some sleuthing to bring it about. She contacted the regiment, which provided White’s last contact information.

“Theoretically, he was still around,” she said, but found the York phone number was out of service. She traced his number through the Toronto directory, though.

“We had a brief conversation; I didn’t want to frighten him so I kept it short.” She cross-referenced the phone number and found it was at Sunnybrook. Through the hospital, she was able to track down White’s daughter. His family helped arrange the reunion via Skype.

“There were lots of tears, weren’t there, Dad? It was very, very emotional.”

White had a stroke a dozen years ago that left him unable to verbalize his thoughts, but through his family he was able to understand the exchange.

“He just had a smile plastered on his face the whole time.”

In 1943, Reimer was just 17, the youngest of 22 children of Mennonite farmers, but he wasn’t going to let his birth year stop him from doing his duty for King and country. He lied about his age and was soon off to train in Nova Scotia and Ontario as a Bren gunner. By the time he reached Europe, the Allied armies had landed in Italy.

That’s where Reimer caught up with his regiment and met White, a sniper. They became fast friends.

“We were in a slit trench together when we got shelled. There were five shells coming at you at a time. Alfred kept saying, ‘Aw, they’re not going to hit us, anyway,’ then another five shells covered us with dirt.”

White, a few years older and already hardened by battle, impressed Reimer with his bravado.

“That’s the way he was taught. He was scared, too. I put my head down and tried to drive it to China. He was the first guy wounded on the front line of that regiment (before they met).

“We were equals, but I always looked up to him,” Reimer said. “I was only 18. I was scared crapless. If someone tells you they weren’t scared, they were liars. But I did my duty.”

They fought side by side as the Allied armies liberated Europe – up through Italy, into France, then the Low Countries, Belgium and the Netherlands, fighting from Arnhem to Zuider Zee before crossing the Rhine. They faced a formidable adversary in the German army.

“They kept shooting at us as we were advancing. I can remember one bullet went by my ear. I can still feel it.”

After Victory in Europe Day, Reimer was anxious to return home, so he signed up for the Pacific theatre, the war against Japan. By the time he reached Ontario, the Japanese had surrendered.

After the war, Reimer went to work for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, later B.C. Rail, and raised his family in Squamish. Three years ago, he relocated to Kamloops to be nearer to family, never thinking it would also bring him nearer to an old friend. "I couldn't believe it", he said.


 

a true Brazilian will never give up until things are totally screwed..." -aeromotacanucksaer

 


#54 hockeyfan87

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:24 PM

My family was greatly impacted by both world wars.

One grandfather was English. He was sent to the pacific theater where he was a minesweeper fighting Japanese in Burma. He went from starting as a Private to being a Warrant Officer first class and received a recommendation from the British Monarch at the time which I am in possession of now. His father, my grandfather, also fought for the British in World War I.

The other grandfather was Dutch. He was a butcher by trade and when Holland was quickly over swept by the Germans he was sent to Germany for the duration of the war to work for them. It was very difficult thing for him to be sent away from his family but given hindsight I think he was one of the lucky ones. He worked, from what I've been told, in relatively good conditions - he had food to eat and a place to sleep. While he was in Germany he met his future wife, my grandmother, who was a German. This would cause friction with his Dutch family after the war and led to them emigrating to Canada.

My German Grandmother's father fought in both world wars. He was conscripted when he was 16 years old to fight in the trenches during World War I. Having heard about the conditions of people dying left and right from dysentery he got scared and deserted. For the remainder of the war he was a wanted man and would have faced death by firing squad if he had been caught. After the war his desertion seemed to be forgotten and he lived average life from what I gather. When World War II started he was once against conscripted and grudgingly went along with it. He was a paratrooper and at one point he was in a plane and was to scared to jump and his superior officer ended up kicking him out the door of the plane. He ended up with a broken leg from the affair.

What do I make of Remembrance Day? I think it serves a purpose. To remind everyone what human beings are capable of. The average soldier did not wish to fight and was forced into it because of factors that were out of their control. I think we should use Remembrance Day as an educational tool to hopefully prevent such atrocities happening on a similar scale again.

#55 Zippgunn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:56 PM

My father was a veteran (Korean War) and held office in the Royal Canadian Legion in his local branch and provincially. After the incident with the Sikh turbans being classified as headgear he pushed hard for apologies and clarification of the policy. When they were not forthcoming he resigned in disgust and has had nothing further to do with the Legion.


Good for him; that's what I did. I have all the respect in the world for the vets of WW1, WW2 and Korea. I also feel for the vets of our peacekeeping troops and for the vets of our adventure in Afghanistan who are getting the shaft from Veterans affairs with regards to things like PTSD. I wish we weren't there, however.
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#56 diesel_3

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 08:06 PM

It's crazy how fast time flies...2 years ago I was overseas and unfortunately had to work yesterday which was pretty upsetting.

It is definitely a different war today then it was in WWI, WWII and Korea. Hard to think that being 24 years old (At the time of my Task Force) I would have been considered 'Old' in the great Wars!

What those men and women accomplished for our country at such young ages makes them true Canadian Heroes!

Always a proud day to be a Canadian!
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#57 diesel_3

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 08:11 PM

Good for him; that's what I did. I have all the respect in the world for the vets of WW1, WW2 and Korea. I also feel for the vets of our peacekeeping troops and for the vets of our adventure in Afghanistan who are getting the shaft from Veterans affairs with regards to things like PTSD. I wish we weren't there, however.


You said it.
I released from the military in March...I never had ANY post deployment meetings/therapy and when I was getting all my release stamps, they realized I never 'booked myself in for any appointments' (Which I didn't know I was supposed to) There was no follow up...And they just swept it under the rug as they handed me my file and said 'Good Luck' and that was it.

I know for a fact i'm not the same person I was before I went...How much did I change? not sure..I'm not the expert!

But ya, I apologize for the rant hijack...I should have posted this prior to my other post!
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#58 JAH

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:08 PM

In regards to the turban/Legion issue: DO NOT confuse the policies and practices of the Legion with the mentality and ethos of the CF and it's members. There has been a long rift between the serving soldier and the Legion. The Legion has been overtaken by non-military blowhards. The turban issue is a non-issue in the CF.

Diesel - I experienced a similar thing in my post-deployment. We had a briefing prior to deployment that was perhaps 30 minutes long on the mental issues we may experience while overseas. This may seem inadequate, but this lack of attention pales in comparison to the post-deployment briefing. A Captain came in with a couple of VA folks and said, and I quote, 'I want to see if I can get this down to less than 5 minutes. You know all those things we said you may experience? You'll feel the same thing again when you go back home. Questions?'

When I did my post-deployment DAG, they noticed I hadn't had my psych debrief. This was a year later when they told me. I got really mad, and let them know in no uncertain terms how I felt about their apparent lack of concern over my mental health (which was fine, but how would they know?).
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#59 Sharpshooter

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:27 PM

In regards to the turban/Legion issue: DO NOT confuse the policies and practices of the Legion with the mentality and ethos of the CF and it's members. There has been a long rift between the serving soldier and the Legion. The Legion has been overtaken by non-military blowhards. The turban issue is a non-issue in the CF.

Diesel - I experienced a similar thing in my post-deployment. We had a briefing prior to deployment that was perhaps 30 minutes long on the mental issues we may experience while overseas. This may seem inadequate, but this lack of attention pales in comparison to the post-deployment briefing. A Captain came in with a couple of VA folks and said, and I quote, 'I want to see if I can get this down to less than 5 minutes. You know all those things we said you may experience? You'll feel the same thing again when you go back home. Questions?'

When I did my post-deployment DAG, they noticed I hadn't had my psych debrief. This was a year later when they told me. I got really mad, and let them know in no uncertain terms how I felt about their apparent lack of concern over my mental health (which was fine, but how would they know?).


JAH, i've always been concerned about your mental health. That's why I'm so tough on you. I'm going to beat the mental out of you, for good. After that, there'll be some warm milk, some nice fresh cookies and maybe a little spooning. We'll see how things go.

And thanks for your service, you nut.

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#60 Wetcoaster

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 07:33 PM

BUMP...

Sunday, November 11, 2012 is Remembrance Day - a time to stop for a minute of silence on the 11th day of the 11th month at the 11th hour and remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

LEST WE FORGET


Remembrance Day Ceremony Lighting the Torch Jack Poole Plaza

Start Date: November 11, 2012
Start Time: 08:00
Details:
Up Early? Come whatch the Torch being lit.


Location:
Jack Poole Plaza / Vancouver Torch
1055 Canada Place
Vancouver, British Columbia





Remembrance Day will start on Sunday at 8 a.m. in Vancouver with the lighting of the Olympic flame at the Jack Poole Plaza, 1055 Canada Place.


Elsewhere, dozens of ceremonies around B.C. start between 10 and 10:30 a.m.


An Ipsos Reid poll commissioned by the Historica Dominion Institute, released Friday, shows three in 10 Canadian expect to attend a Remembrance event this Sunday. That's up from 24 per cent last year and 22 per cent in 2010.




The following shows a partial list of locations for services:


Abbotsford: Thunderbird Memorial Square off Veterans Way


Burnaby: Confederation Park, 250 Willingdon Ave.


Chilliwack: 5661 Vedder Rd.


Coquitlam: 1121 King Albert Ave.


Delta: North Delta Social Heart Plaza, 11415 84 Ave.


Langley: 20570 56 Ave.


Maple Ridge: 11960 Haney Place


North Vancouver: 1200 Lonsdale


Richmond: Granville and No. 3 Rd.


Surrey: 13525 106th Ave.


Vancouver: Victory Square, Hastings and Beatty


Victoria: B.C. Legislature, Government and Belville


West Vancouver: Memorial Arch, 580 18 St.


Whistler: 4100 Village Gate Blvd.


White Rock: City Hall, 15322 Buena Vista Ave.

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