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Japan should let old 'hurry up and die', says finance minister Taro Aso


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#1 key2thecup

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 03:01 PM

Japan should let old 'hurry up and die', says finance minister Taro Aso

JAPAN'S finance minister Taro Aso said the elderly should be allowed to "hurry up and die" instead of costing the government money for end-of-life medical care.

Aso, who also doubles as deputy prime minister, reportedly said during a meeting of the National Council on Social Security Reforms: "Heaven forbid if you are forced to live on when you want to die.
You cannot sleep well when you think it's all paid by the government."

"This won't be solved unless you let them hurry up and die," he said.

"I don't need that kind of care. I will die quickly," he said adding he had left written instructions that his life is not artificially prolonged.

During the meeting, he reportedly referred to "tube people" when talking of patients who cannot feed themselves.

The 72-year-old Aso, a former prime minister, has been in his current job less than a month, but has a long history of planting his foot firmly in his mouth.

In 2001 he triggered a furore by saying a successful country was one where "rich Jews" wanted to live.

After yesterday's mis-step, he tried to backtrack, insisting he had only been talking about his personal wishes when he said the elderly should shuffle off quickly.
"I said what I personally believe, not what the end-of-life medical care system should be," he told reporters.

"It is important that you can spend the final days of your life peacefully."
Aso was born into a blue-blooded industrialist family but his often crude verbal slip-ups stand in marked contrast to his heritage.

He is the grandson of Shigeru Yoshida, one of Japan's most influential prime ministers, who helped rebuild the country from the ashes of World War II, and he is married to the daughter of another former premier.

Ageing is a sensitive issue in Japan, one of the world's oldest countries, with almost a quarter of its 128 million people over 60. That figure is expected to rise to 40 per cent within the next half-century.
At the same time a shrinking number of workers is placing further strain on an already groaning social security system, with not enough money going into the pot to support those who depend on it.

http://www.theaustra...o-1226558570246





Japanese Finance Minister Says Remarks on Elderly Misinterpreted

By Mayumi Otsuma - Jan 20, 2013

Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso said that his remarks on the elderly made earlier in the day were misinterpreted and were intended to refer to himself.

I was not making a general comment,” on medical care for the elderly, Aso, 72, told reporters in Tokyo.

Earlier in the day, Aso indicated that the medical system shouldn’t use resources to extend the lives of elderly people, Kyodo News reported.

One in every four people in Japan will be older than 65 in 2014, according to data compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau.

http://www.bloomberg...nterpreted.html


Edited by key2thecup, 21 January 2013 - 03:02 PM.

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Dr. Ron Paul 2016!

Dr. Rand Paul 2016!


#2 Lancaster

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 03:44 PM

The problem with Japan isn't too many elderly per se, just not high enough birth rate and not enough women re-entering the work force.
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#3 TOMapleLaughs

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

Dying with dignity is quickly moving from the fringe to the mainstream. First it will be optional. Then it won't be. And imho it's long overdue.
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#4 Jaimito

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

lmao

ASO. what a fitting name. he should give every senior a tanto sword to perform hara kiri.
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#5 ronthecivil

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

Or they could just start charging for end of life medical care.

By the way you can expect similarly grim solutions applied right here at home starting in about ten years when we start having the same problems they are having.
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#6 Electro Rock

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:43 PM

There'd be plenty of resources available for taking care of the old and so many other things, if not for the onerous tribute that goes to the bankers and other parasites.


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#7 Lancaster

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:58 PM

There'd be plenty of resources available for taking care of the old and so many other things, if not for the onerous tribute that goes to the bankers and other parasites.


Wrong country. Banks in Europe and North America focuses on their shareholders first and foremost, thus if they gain in the expense of society or other companies, so be it. In Japan, it's keiretsu, where you try to have everyone benefit together. Banks are just part of a symbiotic relationship with all sizes of businesses, people, government, and so on.

While Japan does have a huge debt-to-GDP ratio, unlike the West, a vast majority of those debts are domestic. One corporation lending to another corporation, individuals lending to government, banks, etc. Plus, we all know about all the US bonds China as purchased, Japan pretty much have the same amount of US bonds, so they have a sizable "rainy-day" fund available.

Even though there has been talk of rising unemployment in Japan.... it has increased to the staggering level of 4%! If Canada/USA have only 4% of unemployment, we'd be popping the corks and praising whichever political party is in power for a job well done.

I can't remember where's the article, but it said if Japan's female population have half (or was it the same?) the workforce participation as North America, their GDP would grow up to 10% almost immediately.
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#8 Electro Rock

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:07 PM

Wrong country. Banks in Europe and North America focuses on their shareholders first and foremost, thus if they gain in the expense of society or other companies, so be it. In Japan, it's keiretsu, where you try to have everyone benefit together. Banks are just part of a symbiotic relationship with all sizes of businesses, people, government, and so on.

While Japan does have a huge debt-to-GDP ratio, unlike the West, a vast majority of those debts are domestic. One corporation lending to another corporation, individuals lending to government, banks, etc. Plus, we all know about all the US bonds China as purchased, Japan pretty much have the same amount of US bonds, so they have a sizable "rainy-day" fund available.

Even though there has been talk of rising unemployment in Japan.... it has increased to the staggering level of 4%! If Canada/USA have only 4% of unemployment, we'd be popping the corks and praising whichever political party is in power for a job well done.

I can't remember where's the article, but it said if Japan's female population have half (or was it the same?) the workforce participation as North America, their GDP would grow up to 10% almost immediately.


That may be, but it's all tied together and without the parasites taking their cut the U.S. and Europeans would be VASTLY more prosperous and accordingly much better markets for Japanese goods.
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"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

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#9 Dittohead

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:19 PM

A big die off will be good for our healthcare in the next 20 years or so but I have the feeling the baby boomers will refuse to die.
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#10 Bob.Loblaw

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 11:49 PM

Even though there has been talk of rising unemployment in Japan.... it has increased to the staggering level of 4%! If Canada/USA have only 4% of unemployment, we'd be popping the corks and praising whichever political party is in power for a job well done.


When a country that's been in an economic downturn for decades has such a small unemployment rate, there's obviously something strange going on. I speculate: labour is probably in very high demand, since there is low immigration, low reproduction, and an increasingly ageing population.

I read a news article a few weeks back about how Japan had really amped up its temp workforce. It has become MUCH more affordable for Japanese businesses, which is why the unemployment rate is so low. As for the temp workers? There's a growing population of homeless workers who live in internet cafes or capsule hotels, long-term. I doubt they'll want to stay in Japan any longer than they have to (which would be a nightmare for its already undersized labour force).

Or they could just start charging for end of life medical care.

By the way you can expect similarly grim solutions applied right here at home starting in about ten years when we start having the same problems they are having.


Privatization of hospice care? That is suicide for the LDP. That party is in no position to make any stringent measures that might piss off the general public. Taro Aso is just mouthing himself off, as usual.
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#11 Tortorella's Rant

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 11:50 PM

Will he still feel that way when he's 'old'?
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