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14 People Shot Dead at Dark Knight Rises Theatre in Denver


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#571 Electro Rock

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 08:22 AM

Its not the big media shootings that would be slowed with better gun control & a different cultural attitude, its the tens of thousands (annualy) of other shootings that don't make it past the local papers that would be reduced.


Yup, just as in Britain, or Jamaica or El Salvador, strong 99% gun control will totally reduce the number of firearms related deaths!

I agree with the different cultural attitudes though, getting rid of the failed experiment of '60s radical liberalism would go a long way towards fixing a lot of problems.
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#572 JLumme

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 08:54 AM

Yup, just as in Britain, or Jamaica or El Salvador, strong 99% gun control will totally reduce the number of firearms related deaths!

I agree with the different cultural attitudes though, getting rid of the failed experiment of '60s radical liberalism would go a long way towards fixing a lot of problems.


I don't know if you're being sarcastic or not...

http://en.wikipedia...._United_Kingdom

"In the United Kingdom firearms are tightly controlled by law, and there is little political debate and no strong public opposition to control. The United Kingdom historically had one of the lowest rates of gun homicides in the world even before gun control legislation became stricter from the late twentieth century. [1] In the United Kingdom in 2009 there were 0.07 recorded intentional homicides committed with a firearm per 100,000 inhabitants; for comparison, the figure for the United States was 3.0, about 40 times higher, and for Germany 0.2."

I'd like to think that the US has a stronger rule of law that Jamaica or El Salvidor, think about it for just a half second, shouldn't the US strive to have lower levels of gun violence than two of the poorest most violent countries in the world?
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#573 Electro Rock

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 11:20 AM

The U.K. has experienced a huge increase in shootings and street crime since enacting severe gun control measures in the '90s, personal freedom in that country has taking a huge hit during that same period, coincidently enough.


Edited by Electro Rock, 30 July 2012 - 11:31 AM.

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"The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened."

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#574 JLumme

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 12:31 PM

The U.K. has experienced a huge increase in shootings and street crime since enacting severe gun control measures in the '90s, personal freedom in that country has taking a huge hit during that same period, coincidently enough.


Yeah, there was a HUGE increase in gun crime. Homicides were up a shocking 50% in the first year that new gun control measures were passed.

It probably doesn't matter that the 50% ANNUAL increase in homicides in the UK was in absolute terms about 25 more murders on a base of about 50 murders. Compared with 25 gun homicides in the US every DAY.

www.parliament.uk/briefing-papers/SN01940.pdf

Also you probably don't care that the number of homicides in the UK with a gun have dropped to early 1990's levels.

Great facts though, love the research and thought you put into it. As much research and thought as you put into your position that 'guns = freedom'. What a sad and fearful place the US has become.
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#575 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 12:32 PM

I don't know if you're being sarcastic or not...

http://en.wikipedia...._United_Kingdom

"In the United Kingdom firearms are tightly controlled by law, and there is little political debate and no strong public opposition to control. The United Kingdom historically had one of the lowest rates of gun homicides in the world even before gun control legislation became stricter from the late twentieth century. [1] In the United Kingdom in 2009 there were 0.07 recorded intentional homicides committed with a firearm per 100,000 inhabitants; for comparison, the figure for the United States was 3.0, about 40 times higher, and for Germany 0.2."

I'd like to think that the US has a stronger rule of law that Jamaica or El Salvidor, think about it for just a half second, shouldn't the US strive to have lower levels of gun violence than two of the poorest most violent countries in the world?

As proven in cities that illegally had gun bans, like San Francisco, gun bans don't affect the amount of gun crimes, they don't affect the murder rates.. plus, when are people going to learn that these arguments for other countries don't work for the United States? Do you think the United States pushing us here in Canada for their ridiculous chaotic healthcare system would work here? No. Nor should it. The problem with the US is that too many people there see killing each other as okay. A gun is only one tool used for that means (this guy also had explosives), but guns have far more weight of legal use than illegal, even when every killing spree causes, like clockwork, an overreaction by both the media and it's sycophants who are far too influenced by them. A gun is also a self-defence tool against murder, rape, and the more heinous crimes that criminals in the US would commit without regard to gun laws, or any law for the matter. The only sure thing here is that people who follow the law wouldn't be able to protect themselves from someone who has a gun because they would be unarmed now by following the law. Law abiding citizens without guns does not deter criminals from using guns, if anything, it's an enabler for them (the majority who care about dying) to because they know most people won't have them and face a less likelihood of dying committing such a crime. While they may work in other countries, it's clear the US is not like most other first world countries.

The only reason it's sad and fearful to live in the US is because silly people allow the media to make them think there are gun crimes around every street corner there as if the US is a war zone. It's hilarious how much media hyperbole affects the populace. The reason my wife and I decided to move our family back to Canada was not because we're affected by this humorous depiction of the US as a gun crime war zone, but because here in Canada we look at issues far differently (like health care) and with slightly less polarization and with an ounce more intelligence, but on this matter unfortunately even fellow Canadians are taking a plunge off the deep end.

Edited by zaibatsu, 30 July 2012 - 12:39 PM.

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#576 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 12:40 PM

Colorado shooting suspect charged with 24 counts of first-degree murder:

James Holmes, 24, was formally charged during his second court appearance since his arrest after the massacre during a packed showing of "The Dark Knight Rises" shortly after midnight on July 20.


The rampage left 12 people dead and 58 injured, including several who remain in critical condition.


Holmes, wearing jail garb and with his hair still dyed orange but with the color fading to pink in places, sat impassively at a table with two defense lawyers through the 45 minute hearing.


But he looked more alert than during his first court appearance a week ago, when he looked dazed and groggy. The courtroom was packed with members of the media and family members of victims.


Holmes spoke only once on Monday, answering "yes" when Arapahoe County District Judge William Sylvester asked if he understood the charges against him.


The judge set a pre-trial hearing in the case for September 27 and tentatively scheduled a preliminary hearing for Holmes during the week of November 13.


Prosecutors essentially charged Holmes with two murder counts for each victim - one standard first-degree murder charge plus one count of murder with extreme indifference.


In all, prosecutors have charged Holmes with 142 criminal counts in the shooting, the 24 murder and 116 attempted murder counts plus one count of possession of an explosive device and one count of committing a crime of violence.


The charges mean Holmes is eligible to face the death penalty, although prosecutors have not yet said whether they would seek it in the sensational case.


DEFENSE SEEKS PACKAGE


During the hearing, defense attorney Tamara Brady asked that prosecutors turn over evidence collected in the case. They are seeking a package that news reports have said was sent by Holmes to a University of Colorado psychiatrist, Dr. Lynne Fenton.


Prosecutors responded that they had not yet opened that parcel, which according to Fox News contained a notebook outlining the shooting scenario, including stick-figure drawings.


Holmes, a San Diego native, was a doctoral student of neuroscience at the university's Anschutz campus before filing paperwork to drop out in June.


Court documents filed on Friday by defense lawyers said Holmes had been under Fenton's care.


Also on Thursday, attorneys representing news organizations asked Sylvester to unseal court records and investigative documents that he has closed to public view.


The judge set an August 9 date to consider that issue and said he would hold a hearing on August 16 to determine what evidence should be considered protected between Holmes and his psychiatrist.


Police have not offered a motive for the shooting rampage that stunned the community of Aurora and evoked memories of the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School less than 20 miles away in Littleton.


Authorities have said that following his arrest, Holmes had called himself "the Joker" in reference to Batman's comic-book nemesis.


Holmes was armed on the night of the shooting with a Smith & Wesson M&P .223 semi-automatic rifle, similar to an AR-15 assault rifle; a 12-gauge shotgun and a Glock .40-caliber handgun, according to police.


An additional Glock .40-caliber handgun was found in his car. All the weapons had been bought legally in the previous 60 days.


http://www.reuters.c...E86T00R20120730
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#577 JLumme

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 12:42 PM

As proven in cities that illegally had gun bans, like San Francisco, gun bans don't affect the amount of gun crimes, they don't affect the murder rates.. plus, when are people going to learn that these arguments for other countries don't work for the United States? Do you think the United States pushing us here in Canada for their ridiculous chaotic healthcare system would work here? No. Nor should it. The problem with the US is that too many people there see killing each other as okay. A gun is only one tool used for that means (this guy also had explosives), but guns have far more weight of legal use than illegal, even when every killing spree causes, like clockwork, an overreaction by both the media and it's sycophants who are far too influenced by them. A gun is also a self-defence tool against murder, rape, and the more heinous crimes that criminals in the US would commit without regard to gun laws, or any law for the matter. The only sure thing here is that people who follow the law wouldn't be able to protect themselves from someone who has a gun because they would be unarmed now by following the law. Law abiding citizens without guns does not deter criminals from using guns, if anything, it's an enabler for them (the majority who care about dying) to because they know most people won't have them and face a less likelihood of dying committing such a crime. While they may work in other countries, it's clear the US is not like most other first world countries.

The only reason it's sad and fearful to live in the US is because silly people allow the media to make them think there are gun crimes around every street corner there as if the US is a war zone. It's hilarious how much media hyperbole affects the populace.


For every crime that a gun prevents, there are many more accidental shootings, escalations of violence, and reactionary hot tempered shootings that occur.

I get it, you guys like guns and don't mind a lot of people getting killed to preserve the right to carry guns with very few restrictions relative to the rest of the world.

It just makes you look extremely ignorant when you try to say that 'guns are a good method of self defense', or 'guns reduce crime', or 'its in the constitution and that's still relevant'. Just admit you're perfectly okay with people getting killed at the highest rate in the first world, and we'll be done here.
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#578 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 12:49 PM

For every crime that a gun prevents, there are many more accidental shootings, escalations of violence, and reactionary hot tempered shootings that occur.

I get it, you guys like guns and don't mind a lot of people getting killed to preserve the right to carry guns with very few restrictions relative to the rest of the world.

It just makes you look extremely ignorant when you try to say that 'guns are a good method of self defense', or 'guns reduce crime', or 'its in the constitution and that's still relevant'. Just admit you're perfectly okay with people getting killed at the highest rate in the first world, and we'll be done here.

I'm not saying guns reduce crime, I'm saying guns are a method of self-defence.. murders in the US have been steadily declining anyways, but the fact that it remains so high has to do with the mentality that killing another person is perfectly okay. The only way to defeat this mentality is to change the mentality, not go the already fruitless route of trying to ban guns there. It's been tried. It doesn't work. Continuing to assert something that doesn't work will magically work is living in fantasy land.

Nice typical reactionary portrayal of me as a gun nut.. I've never owned a gun in my life, and I've suggested numerous times few in the US would be opposed to assault rifle bans, including myself. You've embodied so many brainless stereotypes here it's pointless even responding further such misplaced hysteria.

Edited by zaibatsu, 30 July 2012 - 12:50 PM.

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#579 JLumme

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:06 PM

I'm not saying guns reduce crime, I'm saying guns are a method of self-defence.. murders in the US have been steadily declining anyways, but the fact that it remains so high has to do with the mentality that killing another person is perfectly okay. The only way to defeat this mentality is to change the mentality, not go the already fruitless route of trying to ban guns there. It's been tried. It doesn't work. Continuing to assert something that doesn't work will magically work is living in fantasy land.

Nice typical reactionary portrayal of me as a gun nut.. I've never owned a gun in my life, and I've suggested numerous times few in the US would be opposed to assault rifle bans, including myself. You've embodied so many brainless stereotypes here it's pointless even responding further such misplaced hysteria.


You're not a gun nut, but you think that guns are an effective method of self defense? Its your attitude towards gun control that is part of the problem which allows the gun loving culture, ergo people get shot all the time, of the US to persist.
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#580 Slaytanic Wehrmacht

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:11 PM

I think what's being lost in all of this gun control yada yada is the fact that this guy was completely bat**** insane and even if any of the people who were heartlessly mowed down were carrying a concealed firearm I would highly doubt they would have had the reaction time to fish it out while this lunatic was carrying out his rampage. This should not be a discussion on gun laws...it should be a discussion on the poor state of mental health care in the US and how this sort of incident could have been prevented.
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#581 goalie13

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:28 PM

Colorado shooting suspect charged with 24 counts of first-degree murder


Obviously there's something about Colorado law that I don't get. How does Killing 12 people add up to 24 counts of murder?
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#582 RUPERTKBD

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:30 PM

Obviously there's something about Colorado law that I don't get.  How does Killing 12 people add up to 24 counts of murder?


Explained in post #576
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#583 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:35 PM

Obviously there's something about Colorado law that I don't get. How does Killing 12 people add up to 24 counts of murder?

Reading the rest of the post helps rather than just the first sentence.

Edited by zaibatsu, 30 July 2012 - 01:35 PM.

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#584 goalie13

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:37 PM

Explained in post #576


Reading the rest of the post helps rather than just the first sentence.


I did read it thanks.

I see the line that mentions it, but I don't fully understand it. I don't get how they can charge each killing with 2 different murder charges. I thought they had to pick one or the other, but obviously that's not the case.

Edited by goalie13, 30 July 2012 - 01:38 PM.

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#585 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:40 PM

I did read it thanks.

I see the line that mentions it, but I don't fully understand it. I don't get how they can charge each killing with 2 different murder charges. I thought they had to pick one or the other, but obviously that's not the case.

Think of those other charges (i.e. w/extreme indifference) as intensifiers, they don't carry the same weight as the actual murder 1 charges. If someone gets hung up on the word "murder" rather than the scope of the charges in it's entirety they will obviously miss this part. No doubt this helps the media sell their hyperbole story, as if it needs any more of it.

Edited by zaibatsu, 30 July 2012 - 01:42 PM.

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#586 RUPERTKBD

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:42 PM

I did read it thanks.

I see the line that mentions it, but I don't fully understand it.  I don't get how they can charge each killing with 2 different murder charges.  I thought they had to pick one or the other, but obviously that's not the case.


Once again, it would be nice if Wetcoaster were still around, but I get the impression that they're two distinctly different charges. Sort of like charging someone with armed robbery and kidnapping....
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#587 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:51 PM

Once again, it would be nice if Wetcoaster were still around, but I get the impression that they're two distinctly different charges. Sort of like charging someone with armed robbery and kidnapping....

It's used an intensifier, it carries it's own charges but not the same weight, just like murder involving a gang can in some jurisdictions be a separate crime used as an intensifier onto the original charge.

Truthfully though I wouldn't bother complicating the matter, he's charged with murder 1, plus an assortment of other things. He either will or won't potentially face the death penalty, depending on if it's sought out. Personally I don't see need to speculate further.

Edited by zaibatsu, 30 July 2012 - 01:52 PM.

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#588 Electro Rock

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 02:11 PM

Yeah, there was a HUGE increase in gun crime. Homicides were up a shocking 50% in the first year that new gun control measures were passed.

It probably doesn't matter that the 50% ANNUAL increase in homicides in the UK was in absolute terms about 25 more murders on a base of about 50 murders. Compared with 25 gun homicides in the US every DAY.

www.parliament.uk/briefing-papers/SN01940.pdf

Also you probably don't care that the number of homicides in the UK with a gun have dropped to early 1990's levels.

Great facts though, love the research and thought you put into it. As much research and thought as you put into your position that 'guns = freedom'. What a sad and fearful place the US has become.

The U.K. is increasingly becoming an Orwellian police state poses bigger problems than a few shootings, however even being a surveilance society hasn't stopped their overall crime level from being higher than the U.S.
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#589 goalie13

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 03:11 PM

Truthfully though I wouldn't bother complicating the matter, he's charged with murder 1, plus an assortment of other things. He either will or won't potentially face the death penalty, depending on if it's sought out. Personally I don't see need to speculate further.


I wasn't trying to make an issue of it, I just thought it was a curious quirk of law. It's kind of like how I find it curious that in the States you can serve consecutive life sentences as if one life sentence isn't long enough.

Either way, I don't think this guy is going to taste anything resembling freedom for the rest of his life.
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#590 Burnsey

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 08:57 AM

gun laws in all countries has to be more strict. I don't understand why there is even a trial for this guy. You are caught and accused of killing 12 people. He should be sentenced to jail for life or have capital punishment brought to him. The law (in all countries might I add) are supposed to, some degree, scare people from braking it. Well it ain't working. Everyone has to wake up and deliver more severe punishment for killing another person (especially if on purpose).
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#591 Zamboni_14

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:15 AM

gun laws in all countries has to be more strict. I don't understand why there is even a trial for this guy. You are caught and accused of killing 12 people. He should be sentenced to jail for life or have capital punishment brought to him. The law (in all countries might I add) are supposed to, some degree, scare people from braking it. Well it ain't working. Everyone has to wake up and deliver more severe punishment for killing another person (especially if on purpose).


why is there a trial? Are you kidding me! I don't care where you fall on the whole gun issue, how bad your crimes are or how obvious it was that you did the crimes... everyone should have the right to have "their day in court" when "accused" of crimes.
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#592 Fibbing

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:18 AM

I think what's being lost in all of this gun control yada yada is the fact that this guy was completely bat**** insane and even if any of the people who were heartlessly mowed down were carrying a concealed firearm I would highly doubt they would have had the reaction time to fish it out while this lunatic was carrying out his rampage. This should not be a discussion on gun laws...it should be a discussion on the poor state of mental health care in the US and how this sort of incident could have been prevented.


What a stupid post this is. You are too emotionally unstable for me dude.
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#593 Super19

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 11:18 AM

Kinda disappointing to see your name attached to that post, Super19 :(

No offense to anyone but this is probably true.

Posted Image


edit: And who's not to say people of different ethinicites aren't subject to their own media potrayal?


After reading this reflection from Abu Eesa I felt guilty, so my bad. :sadno:

AE ART - The Third Chapter

Allah jalla wa 'ala says, "O you who believe, don't cancel out your charitable acts with reminders and hurtful words." (2:264)

This verse has SO many applications to Muslims today but the thought that came to mind last night were those Muslims responding to the horrible Batman cinema murders in Denver.

Subhanallah. We have seen families, a community and a nation in mourning. So what should we do?

Condemn this inhuman psychopath. Express our sincere condolences with those suffering.

What *did* we do?

Condemned this inhuman psychopath, gave our condolences and then added a cherry on top for bad measure:

"...BUT look at your hypocrisy of not calling the killer a terrorist because IF this had been a Muslim guy then blah blah blah."

"...BUT can you now see the difference between how you treat white criminals and black criminals?!"

"...BUT that's why we tell you Cinemas are places of evil and sin blah blah blah."

"But" this and "If" that - the killer sting at the end of the sentence, the awaited "but" to show your personal agenda as opposed to sincere condolence, indeed the harming of the one you're addressing after you were charitable and kind to them.

Do you think the suffering want to hear about your politics right now? Do you think expressing grief must come with your terms and conditions, such as your identity crisis, your unfortunate skill of showing who Allah talks about in the above verse perfectly with your reminders of past injustices and hurtful words?

There is a time for this, and a time for that. But when you give charity to someone, don't follow it by reminding the guy every time you see him miskeen. And when you're grieving with someone, then just grieve. Show at least some basic humanity. And shut up.


Edited by Super19, 03 August 2012 - 11:24 AM.

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#594 VICanucksfan5551

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:13 PM

After reading this reflection from Abu Eesa I felt guilty, so my bad. :sadno:

[/font][/color]

Good on you for having the humility to admit a mistake.
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#595 hockeyfan87

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:18 PM

gun laws in all countries has to be more strict. I don't understand why there is even a trial for this guy. You are caught and accused of killing 12 people. He should be sentenced to jail for life or have capital punishment brought to him. The law (in all countries might I add) are supposed to, some degree, scare people from braking it. Well it ain't working. Everyone has to wake up and deliver more severe punishment for killing another person (especially if on purpose).


For the law to have any legitimacy it has to be applied equally to everyone. Part of that is due process in that everyone receives their day in court. The principles of our justice system go back to ancient times with the Lady Justice. She wears a blindfold and carries weigh scales to symbolize that justice should be blind and that all things should be considered. This is part of why considering native ancestry in the Monty Robinson case is such a joke.
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#596 JLumme

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:23 PM

http://www.theglobea...article4465642/
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#597 Slaytanic Wehrmacht

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:43 PM

What a stupid post this is. You are too emotionally unstable for me dude.


Spoken like someone who is fortunate not to have to deal with mental health issues and therefore has no frame of reference or any cause to call the post stupid if you've never had to deal with the incompetence of those who are supposed to be providing assistance for people who have these types of problems.
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#598 Don't.Mess.With.Kes<3

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 09:44 PM

http://www.ctvnews.c...igence-1.909758

if you look at the picture of him there and then zoom in a bit, you can clearly see that his pupils are huge- meaning he was likely drugged during his court appearance (which would explain his bizarre behaviour). What's weird though is that I remember reading that the deputies and officers there told reporters that he was not drugged at all and that they believe he was just acting insane. Weird
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#599 Wetcoaster

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 02:41 PM

The accused, James Holmes, has been ordered to stand trial but has not yet entered a plea. It is expected he will plead not guilty by reason of insanity.


The Colorado theatre shooting suspect has been ordered to stand trial, but his lawyers say they’re not ready to enter a plea.


District Judge William Sylvester ruled Thursday that prosecutors had presented sufficient evidence to proceed with charges alleging James Holmes killed 12 people and injured 70 others July 20 at a suburban Denver movie theatre.


Holmes is charged with multiple counts of first-degree murder and attempted murder.


The next major step is for Holmes to enter a plea during an arraignment hearing. Sylvester scheduled the arraignment for Friday but noted defence lawyers will likely ask for a delay.


Holmes’s lawyers filed papers earlier Thursday saying he’s not ready to enter a plea.


They also objected to news media requests to bring cameras into the courtroom during the arraignment. Cameras have been barred from court since Holmes’s initial appearance in July.


If Holmes, 25, is convicted of first-degree murder, he could face the death penalty. Prosecutors have not said whether they would pursue that sentence.


WITNESSES DESCRIBE ARSENAL


At a preliminary hearing this week, prosecution witnesses testified that Holmes spent weeks amassing an arsenal and planning the attack at a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises.


They also detailed an elaborate setup at Holmes’s apartment designed to explode at the same time as the theatre attack several kilometres away.


Prosecution witnesses testified that Holmes began acquiring weapons in early May and, by July 6, had two semi-automatic pistols, a shotgun, a semi-automatic rifle, 6,200 rounds of ammunition and high-capacity magazines that allow a shooter to fire more rounds without stopping to reload.


Holmes’s lawyers called no witnesses this week. They have said he is mentally ill.


The defence motion suggested the possibility of more delays in the case.


MENTAL-HEALTH EVALUATION LIKELY


One possible reason Holmes’s lawyers could ask for a delay is to seek a mental-health evaluation by a doctor of their choosing. If Holmes enters an insanity plea, an evaluation would be done by doctors at the state mental hospital.


Either side also could argue that Holmes is not mentally capable of assisting in his own defence.


If that happens, the judge would order a mental competency evaluation. Sylvester also can order an evaluation if he has his own questions about Holmes’s competence. Doctors at the state mental hospital in Pueblo would conduct such an examination, which can take months.


If Holmes were to be found incompetent, the case would come to a halt while he receives psychiatric treatment at the state mental hospital. He would remain there until doctors can restore him to competency, at which point the case would continue.


Once the judge rules Holmes is competent — either immediately after a competency hearing or after psychiatric treatment — and any other delays are resolved, Holmes would then enter a plea.


This happened with Jared Loughner in the 2011 Tucson, Ariz., shooting that killed six people and wounded 13, including then-congreswoman Gabrielle Giffords.


A federal judge ruled Loughner was incompetent to stand trial. After more than a year in treatment, Loughner was ruled competent, the case proceeded, and he entered guilty pleas. He is serving life in prison.


‘CASE TURNS ON INSANITY’


Ultimately, Holmes was widely expected to plead either not guilty or — more likely — not guilty by reason of insanity.


In the latter case, too, Sylvester would order a psychiatric evaluation by doctors at the state hospital in Pueblo. A jury would consider that evaluation, along with testimony by expert witnesses, any other court-ordered evaluations and other evidence, in deciding at a trial whether Holmes is or is not guilty by reason of insanity.


If found not guilty by reason of insanity, Holmes would be committed to the state mental hospital for treatment. His case would be reviewed every six months. He conceivably could be released if he ever is deemed no longer insane.


“Insanity is what this case is going to turn on,” said Denver criminal defence lawyer Dan Recht. “This is not a whodunit case.”

http://www.theprovince.com/news/Colorado+shooting+suspect+ready+enter+plea+lawyers/7807139/story.html#ixzz2HhnmEui5
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#600 Wetcoaster

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 03:19 PM

Through his lawyers James Holmes offers to plead guilty to avoid death penalty.


Lawyers for Colorado theatre shooting suspect James Holmes said Wednesday he would plead guilty and serve the rest of his life in prison to avoid the death penalty for the attack that killed 12 people and injured 7.


The offer comes just days before the prosecution was set to announce whether they would seek to have Holmes put to death.

Prosecutors wouldn't say Wednesday whether they'd go along with a plea deal, and likely will consult with victims and their families before deciding whether to accept the offer.


If they agree, the case that started July 20 — when prosecutors say Holmes carried out the midnight massacre during a showing of the new Batman movie — could end quickly. In the filing, defence attorneys say the only thing that would hinder Holmes changing his plea on Monday is the prosecution's decision.


In the filing, Holmes' lawyers said they initially made the offer to plead guilty before Holmes' arraignment on March 12. At that hearing, Holmes' attorneys told a judge they weren't ready to enter a plea in the case, and the judge entered a not guilty plea on his behalf.


Defence attorneys also said they're still exploring a mental health defence and "counsel will vigorously present and argue any and all appropriate defences at a trial or sentencing proceeding, as necessary."


Prosecutors say Holmes planned the assault for months, casing the theatre complex in Aurora, amassing a small arsenal and rigging potentially deadly booby-traps in his apartment.


Then he donned a police-style helmet and body armour, tossed a gas canister into the theatre crowd and opened fire, prosecutors said.


Nearly eight months later, the defence has dropped hints about Holmes' mental state but has given no clear statement on whether he would plead insanity.


Holmes, a former graduate student at the University of Colorado, Denver, had seen a psychiatrist at the school before the shootings.


Last week, his lawyers revealed that he was taken to a hospital psychiatric ward in November because he was considered a threat to himself. Holmes was held there for several days and spent much of the time in restraints.


The judge scheduled the trial to start Aug. 5, setting aside four weeks.


http://www.vancouver...l#ixzz2OmUrgnYe

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To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

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Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.




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