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Kids These Days

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Three-year-old passes Mensa test

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Mikhail Ali is in the top 2% of the population for his age A three-year-old has become the youngest member of the high IQ group Mensa after taking a series of tests run by psychologists.

Mikhail Ali, from Bramley, Leeds was put through his paces by experts at the University of York.

Mensa spokeswoman Caroline Garbett said: "We have 25,500 members and fewer than 30 are under the age of 10."

Mikhail's mother Shamsun, 26, told the Yorkshire Evening Post: "We knew he was a gifted child."

Ms Garbett said the testing had been carried out independently by psychologists at the university as Mensa do not normally deal with youngsters below the age of 10.

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start_quote_rb.gifEvery day he amazes us, but underneath it all he's still our little boy tooend_quote_rb.gif

Proud mother Shamsun, quoted by paper. Mikhail undertook a series of tests involving maths, picture and logic puzzles and number sequences.

Mrs Ali added: "Every day he amazes us, but underneath it all he's still our little boy too.

"He still plays with his toys and demands food."

A spokeswoman for the university said they were trying to contact the member of staff who carried out the tests to verify claims that Mikhail has an IQ of 137, putting him in the top two per cent of the population.

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And the Mensa puzzle books I used to do occasionally had incorrect answers in the answer keys. Go figure.

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An IQ of 137 gets you into Mensa?

I always thought it was only for the exceptionally smart.

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An IQ of 137 gets you into Mensa?

I always thought it was only for the exceptionally smart.

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On the flip side, we have Honey Boo Boo.

And Sophia Grace and Rosie :picard:

Pretty impressive kid. At the same time though, I don't want my kids to be geniuses or super whiz kids. I want them to have a normal, fun childhood that isn't spent indoors doing homework all day. They should be outside playing and traveling and trying new things and learning street smarts. And if they choose careers in sports or the arts or something non-academic, I'd hope to be supportive of that. I don't want to be the parent that says "no you can only be a doctor or a lawyer".

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And Sophia Grace and Rosie :picard:

Pretty impressive kid. At the same time though, I don't want my kids to be geniuses or super whiz kids. I want them to have a normal, fun childhood that isn't spent indoors doing homework all day. They should be outside playing and traveling and trying new things and learning street smarts. And if they choose careers in sports or the arts or something non-academic, I'd hope to be supportive of that. I don't want to be the parent that says "no you can only be a doctor or a lawyer".

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As hockeyville88 unknowingly chants down the early parts of my life...namely the antithesis of a "normal, fun childhood that isn't spent indoors doing homework all day. They should be outside playing and traveling and trying new things and learning street smarts" I learned how to read at the age of 18 months. My first novel was The Hobbit at age 4. I breezed through elementary, middle and the first three years of high school. Unforeseen events led to a nightmare senior year and I just became cynical, jaded, angry at school and the incompetence of the teachers I had in 12th grade. I begin to wonder if the time I spent enriching myself when I was younger, based solely on the notion I'm not exactly thrilled with where I am in my life right now, was nothing more than wasted potential. I did attend college for two years, but I was never able to adapt to a classroom setting. I finished my college online, but the potential was so much greater. I now suffer from PTSD because of past traumatic experiences and have to live on a disability check. My IQ at last test was 179, but I'm socially awkward and inept and cannot drive. I cannot help but wonder how different my life would be if I'd grown up with a "normal" childhood and schooling.

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Good as place as any to post this.

Screw labels eh?

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he probably googled all the answers :bigblush:

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As hockeyville88 unknowingly chants down the early parts of my life...namely the antithesis of a "normal, fun childhood that isn't spent indoors doing homework all day. They should be outside playing and traveling and trying new things and learning street smarts" I learned how to read at the age of 18 months. My first novel was The Hobbit at age 4. I breezed through elementary, middle and the first three years of high school. Unforeseen events led to a nightmare senior year and I just became cynical, jaded, angry at school and the incompetence of the teachers I had in 12th grade. I begin to wonder if the time I spent enriching myself when I was younger, based solely on the notion I'm not exactly thrilled with where I am in my life right now, was nothing more than wasted potential. I did attend college for two years, but I was never able to adapt to a classroom setting. I finished my college online, but the potential was so much greater. I now suffer from PTSD because of past traumatic experiences and have to live on a disability check. My IQ at last test was 179, but I'm socially awkward and inept and cannot drive. I cannot help but wonder how different my life would be if I'd grown up with a "normal" childhood and schooling.

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Well, I for one can corroborate that it is so as can several others here. Can you prove that it isn't?

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"i'm smarter than stephen hawking, but i don't know how to use a comma"

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And Sophia Grace and Rosie :picard:

Pretty impressive kid. At the same time though, I don't want my kids to be geniuses or super whiz kids. I want them to have a normal, fun childhood that isn't spent indoors doing homework all day. They should be outside playing and traveling and trying new things and learning street smarts. And if they choose careers in sports or the arts or something non-academic, I'd hope to be supportive of that. I don't want to be the parent that says "no you can only be a doctor or a lawyer".

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Pretty impressive kid. At the same time though, I don't want my kids to be geniuses or super whiz kids. I want them to have a normal, fun childhood that isn't spent indoors doing homework all day. They should be outside playing and traveling and trying new things and learning street smarts. And if they choose careers in sports or the arts or something non-academic, I'd hope to be supportive of that. I don't want to be the parent that says "no you can only be a doctor or a lawyer".

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