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DarthNinja

Bedrock Of Vaccination Theory Crumbles As Science Reveals Antibodies Not Necessary To Fight Viruses

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There is a tiny, tiny chance of a baby being born with defects if the mother isn't already immune to chicken pox. Also, I wouldn't call a less than 1% chance within a 7 week span "highly dangerous". It's no Rubella. Studies show that it is helpful for the elderly (if they have had chicken pox before in their lifetime) to be exposed to chicken pox, as it acts as a booster and prevents an outbreak of shingles.

I didn't say that meningitis isn't deadly. I said that it's not necessary to do a mass immunization as most people won't be exposed in their entire lifetime. I'm sorry that your sister's friend died. My point is that meningitis isn't exactly the common cold.

I have a friend who frequently suffers malarial outbreaks. It sucks, but she's alive despite going through this probably once per year. The wonders of modern medicine mean that yes, if I'm going to a place where I'd be likely to contract malaria I could be immunized beforehand, but if I ended up contracting said illness science could still help me. I won't get a malaria vaccine until it seems to be a very real and dangerous threat, though. I'm not sure why you brought up malaria.

Why is everyone so damned afraid of being sick? Society is so backwards - we don't take care of our bodies and expect that we can just take a shot to prevent what we may be able to fight on our own with a more balanced, healthier lifestyle.

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There is a tiny, tiny chance of a baby being born with defects if the mother isn't already immune to chicken pox. Also, I wouldn't call a less than 1% chance within a 7 week span "highly dangerous". It's no Rubella. Studies show that it is helpful for the elderly (if they have had chicken pox before in their lifetime) to be exposed to chicken pox, as it acts as a booster and prevents an outbreak of shingles.

I didn't say that meningitis isn't deadly. I said that it's not necessary to do a mass immunization as most people won't be exposed in their entire lifetime. I'm sorry that your sister's friend died. My point is that meningitis isn't exactly the common cold.

I have a friend who frequently suffers malarial outbreaks. It sucks, but she's alive despite going through this probably once per year. The wonders of modern medicine mean that yes, if I'm going to a place where I'd be likely to contract malaria I could be immunized beforehand, but if I ended up contracting said illness science could still help me. I won't get a malaria vaccine until it seems to be a very real and dangerous threat, though. I'm not sure why you brought up malaria.

Why is everyone so damned afraid of being sick? Society is so backwards - we don't take care of our bodies and expect that we can just take a shot to prevent what we may be able to fight on our own with a more balanced, healthier lifestyle.

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There is a tiny, tiny chance of a baby being born with defects if the mother isn't already immune to chicken pox. Also, I wouldn't call a less than 1% chance within a 7 week span "highly dangerous". It's no Rubella. Studies show that it is helpful for the elderly (if they have had chicken pox before in their lifetime) to be exposed to chicken pox, as it acts as a booster and prevents an outbreak of shingles.

I didn't say that meningitis isn't deadly. I said that it's not necessary to do a mass immunization as most people won't be exposed in their entire lifetime. I'm sorry that your sister's friend died. My point is that meningitis isn't exactly the common cold.

I have a friend who frequently suffers malarial outbreaks. It sucks, but she's alive despite going through this probably once per year. The wonders of modern medicine mean that yes, if I'm going to a place where I'd be likely to contract malaria I could be immunized beforehand, but if I ended up contracting said illness science could still help me. I won't get a malaria vaccine until it seems to be a very real and dangerous threat, though. I'm not sure why you brought up malaria.

Why is everyone so damned afraid of being sick? Society is so backwards - we don't take care of our bodies and expect that we can just take a shot to prevent what we may be able to fight on our own with a more balanced, healthier lifestyle.

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There is a tiny, tiny chance of a baby being born with defects if the mother isn't already immune to chicken pox. Also, I wouldn't call a less than 1% chance within a 7 week span "highly dangerous". It's no Rubella. Studies show that it is helpful for the elderly (if they have had chicken pox before in their lifetime) to be exposed to chicken pox, as it acts as a booster and prevents an outbreak of shingles.

I didn't say that meningitis isn't deadly. I said that it's not necessary to do a mass immunization as most people won't be exposed in their entire lifetime. I'm sorry that your sister's friend died. My point is that meningitis isn't exactly the common cold.

I have a friend who frequently suffers malarial outbreaks. It sucks, but she's alive despite going through this probably once per year. The wonders of modern medicine mean that yes, if I'm going to a place where I'd be likely to contract malaria I could be immunized beforehand, but if I ended up contracting said illness science could still help me. I won't get a malaria vaccine until it seems to be a very real and dangerous threat, though. I'm not sure why you brought up malaria.

Why is everyone so damned afraid of being sick? Society is so backwards - we don't take care of our bodies and expect that we can just take a shot to prevent what we may be able to fight on our own with a more balanced, healthier lifestyle.

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There is a tiny, tiny chance of a baby being born with defects if the mother isn't already immune to chicken pox. Also, I wouldn't call a less than 1% chance within a 7 week span "highly dangerous". It's no Rubella. Studies show that it is helpful for the elderly (if they have had chicken pox before in their lifetime) to be exposed to chicken pox, as it acts as a booster and prevents an outbreak of shingles.

I didn't say that meningitis isn't deadly. I said that it's not necessary to do a mass immunization as most people won't be exposed in their entire lifetime. I'm sorry that your sister's friend died. My point is that meningitis isn't exactly the common cold.

I have a friend who frequently suffers malarial outbreaks. It sucks, but she's alive despite going through this probably once per year. The wonders of modern medicine mean that yes, if I'm going to a place where I'd be likely to contract malaria I could be immunized beforehand, but if I ended up contracting said illness science could still help me. I won't get a malaria vaccine until it seems to be a very real and dangerous threat, though. I'm not sure why you brought up malaria.

Why is everyone so damned afraid of being sick? Society is so backwards - we don't take care of our bodies and expect that we can just take a shot to prevent what we may be able to fight on our own with a more balanced, healthier lifestyle.

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God dammit this forum sucks. Spent 10 posts trying to post and edit:

There is a tiny, tiny chance of a baby being born with defects if the mother isn't already immune to chicken pox. Also, I wouldn't call a less than 1% chance within a 7 week span "highly dangerous". It's no Rubella. Studies show that it is helpful for the elderly (if they have had chicken pox before in their lifetime) to be exposed to chicken pox, as it acts as a booster and prevents an outbreak of shingles.

I didn't say that meningitis isn't deadly. I said that it's not necessary to do a mass immunization as most people won't be exposed in their entire lifetime. I'm sorry that your sister's friend died. My point is that meningitis isn't exactly the common cold.

I have a friend who frequently suffers malarial outbreaks. It sucks, but she's alive despite going through this probably once per year. The wonders of modern medicine mean that yes, if I'm going to a place where I'd be likely to contract malaria I could be immunized beforehand, but if I ended up contracting said illness science could still help me. I won't get a malaria vaccine until it seems to be a very real and dangerous threat, though. I'm not sure why you brought up malaria.

Why is everyone so damned afraid of being sick? Society is so backwards - we don't take care of our bodies and expect that we can just take a shot to prevent what we may be able to fight on our own with a more balanced, healthier lifestyle.

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Ah, the dreaded nonuple post.

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No crap. I have no idea what's going on with this forum but half the time it give me the pink error screen and the other half posts don't show up.

But srsly...

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You can say that again Lonny....

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Ok so can some one here tell me if fluoride is good or bad for you? Is that movie a joke? I always thought it was good. It's in toothpaste right.

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Ok so can some one here tell me if fluoride is good or bad for you? Is that movie a joke? I always thought it was good. It's in toothpaste right.

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Ok so can some one here tell me if fluoride is good or bad for you? Is that movie a joke? I always thought it was good. It's in toothpaste right.

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In the 70s, the locals fought hard to keep fluoride out of the drinking supply in the lower mainland, therefore we don't have it. I don't think Montreal has it either.

Fluoride definitely isn't "good for you", it's toxic but it's dental benefits are debated worldwide.

Australia had the debate a few years ago, check out Youtube.

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Flouride's dental benefits aren't debated, they are accepted. Too much of it's a bad thing, but you really have to go out of your way to screw that up.

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Dental benefits of putting fluoride in the drinking water are debated

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You seriously just quoted the daily mail, why don't you go quote articles from the Sun and the Onion while you're at it.

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Flouride's dental benefits aren't debated, they are accepted. Too much of it's a bad thing, but you really have to go out of your way to screw that up.

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