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apollo

Where do I start? I want to start playing ice hockey

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Before you buy all the gear, I would look at some skating classes (power skating, skate mill and so on), it will teach you the proper stride first. Then start some stick and puck, which will allow you to continue to work on your skating while getting you work on your hands and shot.

 

If you can skate, you will enjoy it a lot more.

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On 11/6/2016 at 8:34 PM, apollo said:

Hi all, hoping to get some useful info and advice... 

 

Long story short, we didn't have much money growing up and never got into playing ice hockey. Only skated a bunch of times... And hundreds of road hockey games. I can kind of skate, went today and it was a blast so I definitely want to start now that I'm stable in life. Edit: I'm in my 20s if that matters 

 

So a few questions, if there's any other useful info, please let me know :) 

 

A) where can I play? Without having to break the bank to the arbutus club? My work schedule is 7am to 7pm Monday-Fridays, can sometimes get off by 4-5 if necessary.  Then completely free on weekends. I live on the north shore and work in Richmond... Drive thru dt most days. The rec centre by my place which I skated at today doesn't have beginner adult hockey drop in during hours that would work for me. They are thru the work day hours. 

 

B)where do I buy gear, I want them to make sure I have my skates perfectly fitted, I've got pronation and achy feet if I don't have enough support /cushion 

 

C) do I have to buy super expensive sticks? 

 

Thanks in advance! 

 

 

 

 

Yo so I got some experiences to share with you. I am someone who started hockey later in life, when I was 19, not knowing how to skate at all. 
It's a tough but extremely fun and rewarding experience. 

 

If you are sure you want to commit to playing, then definitely you're gonna need all the gear. 

Try to buy used gear or clearance last year's gear. It's not cheap to buy all new gear.

You can generally get the cheapest of all gear since as a newbie, you won't notice the difference between high quality and regular quality gear.

The one exception is skates.

*Don't cheap out on skates. It's super important to go into a store and get them fitted. I suggest buying a mid tier skate from last year or so that is marked for clearance. I bought new $400 Eastons from sportscheck for $99 just because it was the last pair they had and it was last year's version. Getting good comfortable skates will benefit you so much in the long run. They will also last you a really long time, compared to cheap low end skates.

For sticks, once again I recommend getting an old version of a stick on clearance. Maybe get a few cheap $50 composites and try out different flexes and curves to find one that you like. 

 

Now for the actual playing part:

LEARN TO SKATE! That is the most important part of hockey. At the level you're going to be going in, the thing that separates players on how good they are is completely based on skating. Go hit up public skates. Wear a helmet and some shinpads/elbowpads and FALL a lot. Learn that falling isn't scary and not painful. 

At every public skate, set goals for yourself. At this early into your journey, you should be noticing yourself getting better after each skate. You should always leave the rink feeling like you've progressed every session at this stage. 

As for progression, at least learn how to stop before going into an actual organized hockey game. Nothing is as bad as the one guy on the rink who can't stop and is running into everybody and everything. You don't need to learn how to skate backwards yet, just focus on your forward stride and getting comfortable on your edges.

After you learn to stop, learn the basics of crossovers, then tight turns, then transitions, and you've got the basics of forwards skating down. Make sure you can do these skills in both directions! At that time, start getting comfortable going backwards. 

Don't worry about your stickhandling and shooting that much until you've at least gotten this far in your skating. Skating is key!! I hope I've drilled this into your head how important skating is. Hockey isn't like any other sport because you need to learn a completely new skill to be able to participate. Imagine trying to play soccer, but you don't know how to run. That's the best analogy I can come up with. 

 

But yeah, that's what I got for you so far. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. 

 

P.S. Check out "How to hockey" on Youtube. That guy basically taught me everything I know. Best way of learning hockey from scratch!

Edited by JohnLocke
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So I went to public skate... Arg I'm losing confidence. I can't do the hockey stop... I've watched many YouTube clips on stopping too. 

 

I can go pretty fast but I feel it's useless if I can't figure out stopping =/

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2 minutes ago, apollo said:

So I went to public skate... Arg I'm losing confidence. I can't do the hockey stop... I've watched many YouTube clips on stopping too. 

 

I can go pretty fast but I feel it's useless if I can't figure out stopping =/

 

You wont be able to do a hockey stop until you get your balance and strength in the ankles

 

For now try dragging your back foot behind you horizontally until you get the balance to do a full hockey stop

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2 minutes ago, SaintPatrick33 said:

 

You wont be able to do a hockey stop until you get your balance and strength in the ankles

 

For now try dragging your back foot behind you horizontally until you get the balance to do a full hockey stop

Oh really? Ok that makes sense... Thanks was starting to think I'll never learn. 

 

Guess I gotta keep practicing. 

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2 hours ago, Moonshinefe said:

your work schedule sounds horrifying apollo, good luck w/ the hockey

 

I concur, you work 12 hrs per day for 5 days a week? Man how do you socialize and even have the time for hockey bro? :P 

 

Well whatever it is you need to do to make that money, good luck and godspeed brother. 

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8 hours ago, apollo said:

So I went to public skate... Arg I'm losing confidence. I can't do the hockey stop... I've watched many YouTube clips on stopping too. 

 

I can go pretty fast but I feel it's useless if I can't figure out stopping =/

The thing that I did to learn how to stop:

Start by trying to do a snowplow. That's the thing that you do when you're skiing. So uou turn your toes inward

Your skates should look like this /\

Get used to this, maybe take a whole session just to master it. Once you're comfortable, move on to next step

 

Next step is to do a one foot snowplow. So keep one foot pointed forward while your other one does the snowplow.

So your skates should look like this |\

Once again do it until you're comfortable stopping with it. 

 

Finally start trying the hockey stop. It's just like the one foot snowplow, except now your other foot that was pointing forward now points know the same direction as your snowplow foot.

Now it should look like this \\

 

Use your hips through the motion and remember to BEND YOUR KNEES . Everything in hockey is way easier the lower you get. Most times beginners think they're getting low, but it's still nowhere near adequate. 

 

See if this works out for you

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2 hours ago, JohnLocke said:

The thing that I did to learn how to stop:

Start by trying to do a snowplow. That's the thing that you do when you're skiing. So uou turn your toes inward

Your skates should look like this /\

Get used to this, maybe take a whole session just to master it. Once you're comfortable, move on to next step

 

Next step is to do a one foot snowplow. So keep one foot pointed forward while your other one does the snowplow.

So your skates should look like this |\

Once again do it until you're comfortable stopping with it. 

 

Finally start trying the hockey stop. It's just like the one foot snowplow, except now your other foot that was pointing forward now points know the same direction as your snowplow foot.

Now it should look like this \\

 

Use your hips through the motion and remember to BEND YOUR KNEES . Everything in hockey is way easier the lower you get. Most times beginners think they're getting low, but it's still nowhere near adequate. 

 

See if this works out for you

Take this man's advice as gospel.  (How is the island, btw)  A lot of the hockey YT videos are good, but stopping is one they don't describe very well.

 

Remember that it's not about digging the edges into the ice, so don't try to tilt your skates too much.  That is not the point of the exercise.  It's almost like sliding at the start.

 

Also, find a good skate supervisor who's willing to give tips and pointers to beginners!  Online help will only do so much, since we don't know how to help you fix your mistakes!

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I couldn't imagine trying to learn how to skate completely on my own. It took so many practices with coaches/skating instructors to actually be able to skate right.

 

If I have any advice it's make sure you're learning the proper technique first. Worst thing can be to develop really bad habits early. Might also be worth it to take some sort of skating class or lesson. 

 

Also, like JL said, you can pretty much cheap out on every piece of equipment except for skates. 

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3 hours ago, JohnLocke said:

The thing that I did to learn how to stop:

Start by trying to do a snowplow. That's the thing that you do when you're skiing. So uou turn your toes inward

Your skates should look like this /\

Get used to this, maybe take a whole session just to master it. Once you're comfortable, move on to next step

 

Next step is to do a one foot snowplow. So keep one foot pointed forward while your other one does the snowplow.

So your skates should look like this |\

Once again do it until you're comfortable stopping with it. 

 

Finally start trying the hockey stop. It's just like the one foot snowplow, except now your other foot that was pointing forward now points know the same direction as your snowplow foot.

Now it should look like this \\

 

Use your hips through the motion and remember to BEND YOUR KNEES . Everything in hockey is way easier the lower you get. Most times beginners think they're getting low, but it's still nowhere near adequate. 

 

See if this works out for you

Would also recommend that you get your skates sharpened to something thats going to give you less bite in the ice, perhaps Flat Botttom V. Dont have your skates done on a 3/8 thats going to be a little much for a newb..

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1 hour ago, WillyFox said:

Would also recommend that you get your skates sharpened to something thats going to give you less bite in the ice, perhaps Flat Botttom V. Dont have your skates done on a 3/8 thats going to be a little much for a newb..

Finding a reliable sharpener is key and makes a huge difference.  My local rink guys are absolute garbage.

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2 hours ago, Bob.Loblaw said:

(How is the island, btw)  

 

We have to go back!

 

1 hour ago, WillyFox said:

Would also recommend that you get your skates sharpened to something thats going to give you less bite in the ice, perhaps Flat Botttom V. Dont have your skates done on a 3/8 thats going to be a little much for a newb..

I'm not sure how good FBV would be for a beginner. But then again, I've never had a pair of skates on FBV but I do hear from people that it's a bit of an adjustment process. Also the benefits from FBV are more noticeable on strong skaters such as getting more bite for aggressive turns and such and wouldn't matter as much to a new skater. 

That being said, I'd recommend if he does traditional sharpening to do a 5/8 or something near that for now while learning how to stop. But it all comes down to personal preference later. 

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2 hours ago, JohnLocke said:

We have to go back!

 

I'm not sure how good FBV would be for a beginner. But then again, I've never had a pair of skates on FBV but I do hear from people that it's a bit of an adjustment process. Also the benefits from FBV are more noticeable on strong skaters such as getting more bite for aggressive turns and such and wouldn't matter as much to a new skater. 

That being said, I'd recommend if he does traditional sharpening to do a 5/8 or something near that for now while learning how to stop. But it all comes down to personal preference later. 

Yeah to be honest I'v had the FBV done and felt like there was a lot more glide then bite.. but yeah cant go wrong with a 5/8 thats what I use on regular basis! also its very important that you get your skates sharpened by a reliable place! do not go to "sportcheck"..

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www.hockeytourney.ca

 

A great way to start! They have beginner drop ins, hockey lessons, and a beginner hockey league. Karim runs a great program. 

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Wait are all rinks closed tomorrow cuz of the holiday? 

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11 hours ago, apollo said:

Wait are all rinks closed tomorrow cuz of the holiday? 

Most likely 

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Take figure skating lessons.   Faster way to learn to skate correctly.

 

Thats how  Dorset got his great skating skills....

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On Wednesday, November 09, 2016 at 11:58 PM, SaintPatrick33 said:

 

You wont be able to do a hockey stop until you get your balance and strength in the ankles

 

For now try dragging your back foot behind you horizontally until you get the balance to do a full hockey stop

How long does it take to develop the strength in the ankles? I feel like my ankle never had muscles develop around there... Never skiid or really skated growing up. 

 

Or do I need like a skate that supports my ankle more? 

 

Hoping things turn around... I love the game but I can't imagine playing it with such horrible skating skills =/

 

On Thursday, November 10, 2016 at 11:42 AM, Beluga Whale said:

I couldn't imagine trying to learn how to skate completely on my own. It took so many practices with coaches/skating instructors to actually be able to skate right.

 

If I have any advice it's make sure you're learning the proper technique first. Worst thing can be to develop really bad habits early. Might also be worth it to take some sort of skating class or lesson. 

 

Also, like JL said, you can pretty much cheap out on every piece of equipment except for skates. 

Yea I'm getting frustrated, at my 3rd public skate today. I'm gonna do some adult lessons... I feel like my ankles don't even stay as straight as anyone else on the ice. I had my skate properly fitted at SportChek too so iono why, I think it's just no muscles there? 

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4 minutes ago, apollo said:

How long does it take to develop the strength in the ankles? I feel like my ankle never had muscles develop around there... Never skiid or really skated growing up. 

 

Or do I need like a skate that supports my ankle more? 

 

Hoping things turn around... I love the game but I can't imagine playing it with such horrible skating skills =/

 

Yea I'm getting frustrated, at my 3rd public skate today. I'm gonna do some adult lessons... I feel like my ankles don't even stay as straight as anyone else on the ice. I had my skate properly fitted at SportChek too so iono why, I think it's just no muscles there? 

 

 

Just keep skating, there will be no "quick fix", a lot of these guys are telling you to take lessons which IMO would be a waste of money. Right now you probably lose balance over every groove in the ice, you just gotta really dig in your strides, and do not be afraid to fall. Keep leaning forward

 

Yea some decent skates will help, make sure you tighten them up and also wear some thick socks to give you more padding to help with the wobbles. If you buy a new pair of skates you will also have to "break them in" which will make it tougher for you at the start. Once they mold to your feet you will find it much easier.

 

I also mentioned getting a pair of rollerblades so that way even if you do not have rink time you can just go out and practice on the pavement (wear a helmut and elbow wrist guards though!)

 

Just keep at er, after a few months of regular practice you will get noticeably better, at which time you will update this thread on your progress :)

 

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