Sign in to follow this  
RUPERTKBD

Humboldt Broncos Involved in Bus Crash

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

25 minutes ago, otherwise said:

 

where the trees are looks like a farm yard to me. It's common for there to be trees like that around a yard. Just a FYI. There are yards near many intersections, if you're stopped at the stop sign you should be able to see fine since the trees aren't in the ditch.

The first thing I noticed,is there is no lights flashing above the intersection.

Although the high cost,.in prairie and farm land intersections,it should be mandatory to have these flashing lights,may they be red or yellow,they should be there to signal a major intersection.

Edited by blaise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alflives said:

Tragedy’s like this, where so many young innocent lives are taken, are very hard for families to accept.  Religious belief comforts those who remain alive.  

Or can challenge their faith. It would for me. knowing that the God I am supposed to believe in didnt stop my child from dying. I guess my question is a theological one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, blaise said:

The first thing I noticed,is there is no lights flashing above the intersection.

Although the high cost,.in prairie and farm land intersections,it should be mandatory to have these flashing lights,may they be red or yellow,they should be there to signal a major intersection.

it looks like there is a flashing red above the stop sign and a street light on either side of the intersection, that's special for this type of intersection. Most places it would be rumble strips across the highway coming up to the stop sign. Sometimes it's only a stop sign. It's a lot different driving in the prairies than in a city.

 

5 minutes ago, we win the cup in 2022 said:

Or can challenge their faith. It would for me. knowing that the God I am supposed to believe in didnt stop my child from dying. I guess my question is a theological one.

The answer would probably be it's gods plan. I'm not religious, but that's my understanding.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, RUPERTKBD said:

I'm honestly a little confused at how you can't see it. It's pretty obvious....

 

The truck approaches the intersection from the east on 335, with the trees to his left. The bus approaches from the south on 35, with the trees to their right. They wouldn't see each other until they were actually in the intersection.

 

It's correct to say that the crash wouldn't have happened had the truck driver stopped at the stop sign, but at this point, we don't know why he didn't. Negligence is an obvious reason, but there are other possibilities as well, such as road conditions.

The quote you replied to was for Alf who said:

 

"I wonder if the trees blocked the truck driver’s view of the stop sign? "

 

 So I reposted your description, which indicates that the trees are nowhere near the stop sign.

 

 

Edited by gurn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Alflives said:

My point is the truck driver doesn’t need to see the bus coming, because he’s got a stop sign, which he should clearly see.  The trees should have nothing to do with this tragedy.  The stop sign is in clear view and big.  The truck driver should have been gearing down to stop well before that intersection.  

This is the key point.  The stop sign was on the truck drivers right, tree's on the left.  They did not obscure his view of the stop sign. He should have stopped!

 

I speculated earlier it was at 5 pm, the sun was going down. Anyone who has ever travelled on a frozen road in Saskatchewan, with snow covered fields on the side, at sundown heading West has experienced being snow blind. Begs the question why you would not slow down if you could not see?  But I'm just speculating.  What I do know is people who drive those roads, expressed earlier, can almost count the telephone poles to the next intersection. The locals know that grove of tree's, where the train crossing, the intersection all are in their sleep. It makes blowing the intersection for the truck driver even harder to understand.    

 

News reports suggested wait to see if ice was involved, the driver could not stop, had brake or other problems.  They released him, so probably he was not distracted by alcohol, texts, or otherwise?  But they also reported that was not established. We'll have to wait.

 

10 hours ago, coastal.view said:

how about they just cut down those trees

since the intersection already has a history as white crosses are planted

it appears to be some sort of a trap. or accident facilitator

due to poor visibility conditions

at a location where at least in one direction vehicles are traveling at highway speeds

 

i mean how stupid is that intersection????

Have you ever lived on a farm???

 

A line of tree's is commonly a wind break. And denominates where one property stops, the next begins. Lord knows you deserve a break from the wind at your homestead. Or the cold wind would come all the way from some place 500 km's away across the frozen prairie. Behind which is a ditch to collect and store water. 

 

A four way stop sign, with lights, rumble strips to warn people to slow down?  Sure.

9 hours ago, coastal.view said:

so you are content to design and allow intersections where visibility is greatly obscured

in remote areas where as you indicate is it is likely and not entirely unreasonable to assume no one else is driving in that area

when if visibility were improved everyone could see everything that is in fact going on ?

 

We should also cut down the mountains, forests on the way up the Coquihalla?  

 

I'm just saying, you are on the wrong track.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, gurn said:

The quote you replied to was for Alf who said:

 

"I wonder if the trees blocked the truck driver’s view of the stop sign? "

 

 So I reposted your description, which indicates that the trees are nowhere near the stop sign.

I figured that out later, after I had posted my response. From my perspective, I pretty much saw your quote and responded, instead of looking at what Alf had said, :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Canuck Surfer said:

This is the key point.  The stop sign was on the truck drivers right, tree's on the left.  They did not obscure his view of the stop sign. He should have stopped!

 

I speculated earlier it was at 5 pm, the sun was going down. Anyone who has ever travelled on a frozen road in Saskatchewan, with snow covered fields on the side, at sundown heading West has experienced being snow blind. Begs the question why you would not slow down if you could not see?  But I'm just speculating.  What I do know is people who drive those roads, expressed earlier, can almost count the telephone poles to the next intersection. The locals know that grove of tree's, where the train crossing, the intersection all are in their sleep. It makes blowing the intersection for the truck driver even harder to understand.   

I wondered about that as well, but yesterday the sun set in Humboldt at about 7:45 pm, so I don't think that was it.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CBC is reporting that the coroner misidentified two of the players. Parker Tobin, who was thought to have survived actually died in the crash, while Xavier Labelle was was announced as one of the deceased, is still alive:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/coroner-mistake-1-humboldt-player-thought-alive-is-dead-another-believed-dead-is-alive-1.4611045

Quote


Two people on the bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team when it crashed were misidentified — one player pronounced as dead is alive, and another believed to be alive is dead, the Saskatchewan Justice Ministry says.

One of the players initially announced as dead was identified as Xavier Labelle. In fact, Labelle survived the crash.

Parker Tobin, another of the 15 who died, was previously "misidentified" and believed to have survived, the ministry said.

 

A ministry spokesperson said the Office of the Chief Coroner apologizes for the misidentifications and any confusion created by them. 

 

You have to feel for the Tobin family.....thinking that a miracle had taken place,,,,only to have that miracle cruelly snatched away.

 

Meanwhile, the Labelle family receives the best news imaginable....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Assistant coach Chris Beaudry wasn't on the bus, because of where he lives:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/humboldt-broncos-coach-missed-fatal-bus-ride/ar-AAvDcaw?li=AAggNb9

Quote

 

Beaudry does not live in Humboldt. He resides in Saint-Front, which is located between Spalding and Rose Valley, so his travel route was based on logistics.

“Because of where I live, every game that we go north or east, I drove myself,” he explained. “It just didn’t make sense to drive to Humboldt to then go right past my home again.”

 

There's no doubt in my mind that Beaudry would be dead if he had been on that bus. I've ridden the buses hundreds of times in my lifetime and I can count the number of times that the coaching staff didn't ride up front on one hand...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Amateur Hour for CSI in here now. 

 

Hmmm....I dunno...I'd say we scooped the National Post, at least:

 

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/humboldt-broncos-bus-crash-what-the-photos-show-about-the-point-of-impact/ar-AAvDqEE?li=AAggNb9

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Canuck Surfer said:

This is the key point.  The stop sign was on the truck drivers right, tree's on the left.  They did not obscure his view of the stop sign. He should have stopped!

 

I speculated earlier it was at 5 pm, the sun was going down. Anyone who has ever travelled on a frozen road in Saskatchewan, with snow covered fields on the side, at sundown heading West has experienced being snow blind. Begs the question why you would not slow down if you could not see?  But I'm just speculating.  What I do know is people who drive those roads, expressed earlier, can almost count the telephone poles to the next intersection. The locals know that grove of tree's, where the train crossing, the intersection all are in their sleep. It makes blowing the intersection for the truck driver even harder to understand.    

 

News reports suggested wait to see if ice was involved, the driver could not stop, had brake or other problems.  They released him, so probably he was not distracted by alcohol, texts, or otherwise?  But they also reported that was not established. We'll have to wait.

 

Have you ever lived on a farm???

 

A line of tree's is commonly a wind break. And denominates where one property stops, the next begins. Lord knows you deserve a break from the wind at your homestead. Or the cold wind would come all the way from some place 500 km's away across the frozen prairie. Behind which is a ditch to collect and store water. 

 

A four way stop sign, with lights, rumble strips to warn people to slow down?  Sure.

We should also cut down the mountains, forests on the way up the Coquihalla?  

 

I'm just saying, you are on the wrong track.

Even with the trees the limited visibility shouldn't have been an issue.  The trees only

look to be about 100m or so in either direction.  Any vehicle(s) approaching the intersection would have seen each other possibly kilometres before the actual intersection - getting closer and closer.

 

there doesn't appear to be any skid marks.

 

i hate to say it but it appears somebody was distracted while driving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, coastal.view said:

how about they just cut down those trees

since the intersection already has a history as white crosses are planted

it appears to be some sort of a trap. or accident facilitator

due to poor visibility conditions

at a location where at least in one direction vehicles are traveling at highway speeds

 

i mean how stupid is that intersection????

After having lived on the Prairies for 2 years now, I often take these style highways/rural roads/township roads when travelling between towns. The stop signs I see at these hwy crossings are HUGE. Like you can't miss them. It's like they are 3x bigger than your average stop sign. Plus some intersections even have rumble strips to alert you or even notices of stop sign ahead. And yes many of them have direct through traffic while the crossing road has the stop signs. There are pockets of trees everywhere for wind breaks that while they sometimes seem to be in poor spots, advocating that land owners cut down trees on their private property is a little much just because the trees may have played a factor in the accident.

 

It's unfortunate that people died in this accident but driving is a risk and you can only be accountable for yourself and your actions on the road. I drive the Yellowhead Hwy on my way home from work and I can assure that 2-3 times per week I am forced to come to a near dead stop in the middle of nowhere from like 120 km/hr because someone ahead of me did something idiotic and nearly caused a massive pileup. I can see how this accident occurred and despite all the efforts made to make the intersections safe, it just doesn't take into account speeding, unawareness or poor decision making.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to Kinder Morgan, the risk of a major oil spill on this route is small; a once-in-473-years event. To put that into perspective, a “major” spill would be 3,000 times larger than an incident in 2015, where the cargo ship M

re than 2,800 litres of fuel into Vancouver

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rene Cannon and her family hosted Humboldt Broncos players' Xavier Labelle, Adam Herold and Logan Hunter in their home this season.

 

All three were believed to have been killed crash until it was announced this morning that Labelle had indeed survived the crash.

 

"We aren't built to not get attached. We take every single boy that's ever come into our house right into our hearts and into our family," she told CBC. "They're children of our heart from the moment they walk in our door. We don't just feed them and house them, we care about them."

 

SeMzAwh.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.