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BedBeats™2.0

Behind The Bench w. John Tortorella

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It seems he hates talking just after a game. Maybe the press conferences should be held the following day to let him cool down a bit.

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It seems he hates talking just after a game. Maybe the press conferences should be held the following day to let him cool down a bit.

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It seems he hates talking just after a game. Maybe the press conferences should be held the following day to let him cool down a bit.

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It's his relationship with the press, past that he gets respect.

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What I take from those interviews is that Hansen will be playing 17-20 minutes a game.

Kesler and Burrows will play 25+ minutes.

He likes hard workers.

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What I take from those intervies is that Hansen will be playing 17-20 minutes a game.

Kesler and Burrows will play 25+ minutes.

He likes hard workers.

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What I take from those interviews is that Hansen will be playing 17-20 minutes a game.

Kesler and Burrows will play 25+ minutes.

He likes hard workers.

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At least he will have the guts to plant Edler on the bench after his 3rd or 4th blunder on any given night.

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It is not his coaching skills that are his undoing.

The man is a freaking slime ball wrapped up in an idiot.

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It is not his coaching skills that are his undoing.

The man is a freaking slime ball wrapped up in an idiot.

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Thanks BedBeats for the links.

I just had time to watch the first one. My dislike for Tortorella, as coach, is unchanged, though consolidated.

He gave a mini-video analysis on neutral zone defense that criticized Gaborik. But coaches have to flexible. And despite Tortorella's constant defense of himself as a "flexible" guy who "listens" to his players, it's up to the coach to adjust his approach, at least somewhat, to the specific talents of his players. As a good comparable, Vigneault let the Sedins do pretty much what they wanted offensively. A more flexible coach, in that particular instance, would have noted Gaborik's much greater asset as an offensive forward, by pairing him with an opposite side winger who could cover for those neutral zone plays. In that speciafic case, it means that the greater responsibility would have been on that other forward to pre-emptively backcheck so that it would have been a common 2 on 2 rather than the much better scoring chance it turned out to be.

Second point -- again, despite Tortorella's self-praise, it took several games -- every game vitally important in the lockout-shortened season, according to Tortorella himself -- to listen to the players tell him that the practises were wearing them out during the games themselves. A truly observant, flexible coach would have sensed that long before the poor efforts on the ice had piled up.

P.S. The great defensive coach, Jacques Lemaire, sure didn't have trouble incorporating Gaborik into his defense-first system.

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Thanks BedBeats for the links.

I just had time to watch the first one. My dislike for Tortorella, as coach, is unchanged, though consolidated.

He gave a mini-video analysis on neutral zone defense that criticized Gaborik. But coaches have to flexible. And despite Tortorella's constant defense of himself as a "flexible" guy who "listens" to his players, it's up to the coach to adjust his approach, at least somewhat, to the specific talents of his players. As a good comparable, Vigneault let the Sedins do pretty much what they wanted offensively. A more flexible coach, in that particular instance, would have noted Gaborik's much greater asset as an offensive forward, by pairing him with an opposite side winger who could cover for those neutral zone plays. In that speciafic case, it means that the greater responsibility would have been on that other forward to pre-emptively backcheck so that it would have been a common 2 on 2 rather than the much better scoring chance it turned out to be.

Second point -- again, despite Tortorella's self-praise, it took several games -- every game vitally important in the lockout-shortened season, according to Tortorella himself -- to listen to the players tell him that the practises were wearing them out during the games themselves. A truly observant, flexible coach would have sensed that long before the poor efforts on the ice had piled up.

P.S. The great defensive coach, Jacques Lemaire, sure didn't have trouble incorporating Gaborik into his defense-first system.

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And where did that get the Wild? One post season birth in 10 years. Albeit it was a good one.

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You don't know the playoff record of Jacques Lemaire? He wrote the book on defense first hockey, and single-handedly changed the way the game is played, even today.

It all started with the '95 Devils. His Stanley Cup win with that talent-challenged team opened everybody's eyes. His top-scoring forward that year was a non-entity. (Hint: he's the Jack Adams award winner this year.)

Beyond that, my point should have been obvious. If a defense-first coach like Lemaire, a guy who preached D, D, D to what some would consider a fault, could let the reins out, when appropriate, for Gaborik, why couldn't the "flexible" Tortorella? I'll answer that. Because Tortorella is an unsophisticated coach who preaches ironclad systems no matter who the players are, and who can't even tell when players are exhausted (which the first video makes plain), so uni-focused is he on having the players "work hard". Working hard is a given. Working smarter is more important.

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It is not his coaching skills that are his undoing.

The man is a freaking slime ball wrapped up in an idiot.

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