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3 hours ago, Kragar said:

Thanks @Warhippy, @canuktravella and others for your insights here.  I love taking pics, but fortunately my wife likes to manage the storage and sorting of them... I just don't have the time (ok, don't like to take the time!).  I want to learn how to use the camera better, but for now I only take small steps playing around with the manual settings.  Part of the problem is that the shooting is too often few and far between, only taking pics while traveling or at the SD Wild Animal Park.  Obviously, if I took the time to shoot more and experiment, I would learn more.  Someday...

 

Was gonna share some pics, but my work laptop won't let me.  I'll post some soon

 

 

We all start some where man.  Just keep shooting

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On 7/14/2017 at 0:21 PM, Warhippy said:

Always shoot RAW or if using Fuji, their version of RAW files.  Far better recovery of shadows and highlights

 

Light pollution is always a pain but Revelstoke is a great place to shoot.  Good sky tracker apps will show you where the MIlkyway is in regards to the horizon to  get that "shot" people speak of.

I shoot in both raw and jpeg. Problem is i don't have lightroom and I've just been putting off getting it. Is there any specific app that you recommend? Going to the interior soon so i'll be taking plenty of pics.

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15 minutes ago, Penskih said:

I shoot in both raw and jpeg. Problem is i don't have lightroom and I've just been putting off getting it. Is there any specific app that you recommend? Going to the interior soon so i'll be taking plenty of pics.

Lightroom is the current industry standard for photo development.  MacPhun's Luminar is looking good and capture one pro is also good but very very detailed

 

For the cost LR 6 at $225 as a standalone is just fine vs the $15 a month CC bundle

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22 hours ago, Penskih said:

 

 

Little deer

resizeeeee.thumb.png.9220c03e3da080262efe854501c655de.png

 

 

Sort of boring but i like it at the same time

resizeeeeee.thumb.png.ac3d3c4267f1e366c6fbfdc6e8849cb5.png

Great shot of the deer, and I don't see anything wrong with the "boring" shot.  Depends on your mood perhaps.  But then, I've always like grey.

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13 hours ago, brilac said:

Taken last year in Quebec City. I like this picture, and was unaware that this couple was holding hands until I looked at my pictures afterwards.

 

mJphzuq.jpg

Gotta love lucky shots :)  Like my rhino pic above.  Couldn't get that again if I tried

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Question for @Warhippy, or anyone else with the knowledge.  Brilac's QC photo above reminded me of this.  I have a graduated filter that when used correctly should help with the partial shadowing like in her pic, or my tiger pic above.  Conceptually it's a great idea, but I suspect like most beginners, I am on the move shooting everything in sight that looks interesting, and many of those shots wouldn't require the filter. 

 

What is your experience or advice in that situation?  Would you:

 

1. take the time to pop the filter on for a shot or two, risking losing the shot,

2. leave the filter on all the time in the hopes that it doesn't mess with other photos, 

3. go without, or

4. something I haven't thought of

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4 hours ago, Kragar said:

Question for @Warhippy, or anyone else with the knowledge.  Brilac's QC photo above reminded me of this.  I have a graduated filter that when used correctly should help with the partial shadowing like in her pic, or my tiger pic above.  Conceptually it's a great idea, but I suspect like most beginners, I am on the move shooting everything in sight that looks interesting, and many of those shots wouldn't require the filter. 

 

What is your experience or advice in that situation?  Would you:

 

1. take the time to pop the filter on for a shot or two, risking losing the shot,

2. leave the filter on all the time in the hopes that it doesn't mess with other photos, 

3. go without, or

4. something I haven't thought of

Grad filters work in what they call stops.  Stops being levels of apertures to effectively allow specific amounts of light to bleed in to the filter.  Graduated Neutral density Filters will in fact block out the upper or lower half of a frame and usually work best in conditions of full daylight, sunset or sunrise to ensure you can get a proper exposure of your foreground without blowing out the colour/clouds/highlights of the sky itself.

 

The issue with grad filters now if they're not used in Long Exposure Photography is that their effect can be mimicked in post production during editing by dropping a grad filter in LR/Camera RAw or Photoshop on to the image and brushing the areas needed.

 

One of the most powerful filters is actually the Circular Polarizer which does to the sky what your sunglasses do.  That is always a great thing to have and why many filter companies like Wine and Country, NiSi and Lee offer them with their full sets.  It gives the sky a rich tone and shows variable depth in clouds that is almost impossible to replicate in post production.

 

So in effect

 

Grad filters, good for sunsets/sunrises or bright days.  Grad to the upper half of or sky in your shots

Full stop ND's great for daylight long exposure, best to stack a .3 and a 1.0 with a polarizer

Expect colour costing and or vignetting so do not buy cheap filters if possible.

Can take away from the quality of a shot if doing portraiture.

 

These filters and items were created and still work very well in the field depending on what you use them for.

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2 hours ago, Warhippy said:

Grad filters work in what they call stops.  Stops being levels of apertures to effectively allow specific amounts of light to bleed in to the filter.  Graduated Neutral density Filters will in fact block out the upper or lower half of a frame and usually work best in conditions of full daylight, sunset or sunrise to ensure you can get a proper exposure of your foreground without blowing out the colour/clouds/highlights of the sky itself.

 

The issue with grad filters now if they're not used in Long Exposure Photography is that their effect can be mimicked in post production during editing by dropping a grad filter in LR/Camera RAw or Photoshop on to the image and brushing the areas needed.

 

One of the most powerful filters is actually the Circular Polarizer which does to the sky what your sunglasses do.  That is always a great thing to have and why many filter companies like Wine and Country, NiSi and Lee offer them with their full sets.  It gives the sky a rich tone and shows variable depth in clouds that is almost impossible to replicate in post production.

 

So in effect

 

Grad filters, good for sunsets/sunrises or bright days.  Grad to the upper half of or sky in your shots

Full stop ND's great for daylight long exposure, best to stack a .3 and a 1.0 with a polarizer

Expect colour costing and or vignetting so do not buy cheap filters if possible.

Can take away from the quality of a shot if doing portraiture.

 

These filters and items were created and still work very well in the field depending on what you use them for.

Thanks so much here.  Regarding the circular polarizers... is this something you tend to leave on for all daytime shooting, or would you also remove it on overcast days?  

 

I sure like the idea of it, and it's not super expensive, looking at a little under $100 for the Nikon, and $25-$30 for Tiffen or Hoya (US dollars).  The Nikon one looks like it does more, with multi-layer coating on both sides to further reduce unwanted flare/ghosting, but the others seem like they do a decent job as well.  Any thoughts.  Is Nikon just hyping, or is it a reasonable selling point?

Edited by Kragar
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On 7/19/2017 at 6:45 PM, brilac said:

Taken last year in Quebec City. I like this picture, and was unaware that this couple was holding hands until I looked at my pictures afterwards.

 

mJphzuq.jpg

I always love seeing old couples holding hands. In a world full of so many broken marriages and relationships, it's encouraging to see some that make it last for so long and are still so close.

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1 hour ago, -AJ- said:

I always love seeing old couples holding hands. In a world full of so many broken marriages and relationships, it's encouraging to see some that make it last for so long and are still so close.

Totally agree.  I have an image from when I first grabbed a camera of this older couple (70s or so) and it' just so simple, they're standing on the edge of a hill looking over the lake.  Every time I wonder if I want to keep shooting for a living I look back at that photo

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8 hours ago, Kragar said:

Thanks so much here.  Regarding the circular polarizers... is this something you tend to leave on for all daytime shooting, or would you also remove it on overcast days?  

 

I sure like the idea of it, and it's not super expensive, looking at a little under $100 for the Nikon, and $25-$30 for Tiffen or Hoya (US dollars).  The Nikon one looks like it does more, with multi-layer coating on both sides to further reduce unwanted flare/ghosting, but the others seem like they do a decent job as well.  Any thoughts.  Is Nikon just hyping, or is it a reasonable selling point?

I would suggest Sigma, Hoya's top of the line or B+W whih is about as good a circular filter as you can get.  The cheaper the filter the more light leaks you could have or cross threading and vignetting can be a pain to correct as well.

 

As for use, anything with a sky in it.  I would leave it on for.  Again, go get a solid pair of sunglasses, looking away from the sun find a nice stack of clouds, put the shades on take them off a few times.  You'll see what a CPL can do to an image quickly.  I wouldn't necessarily use it in a city or for portraits but anything with a sky or significant amount of water in it for sure

Edited by Warhippy
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First couple rolls of film developed today and the Pentax and I are certainly doing work. Images turned out better than the lady at the store probably anticipated given my nooby nature. Clearly still a lot to learn and I am looking forward to taking in all of the new info as I fumble about

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7 hours ago, Pernell Karl said:

First couple rolls of film developed today and the Pentax and I are certainly doing work. Images turned out better than the lady at the store probably anticipated given my nooby nature. Clearly still a lot to learn and I am looking forward to taking in all of the new info as I fumble about

You see a lot of people moving back to analog these days or buying digital backs for old rollieflex bodies.  It's kinda cool seeing the results

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