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44 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

Lol, yes.  I 100% disagree with them and their statements and actions.

 

But the meat of the matter Lancaster brought up was the difference between Japan and Canada and how the respective populations are handling things.  That poster is not incorrect at all and it's actually eye opening because we ARE in fact that polarized along party/political/health lines.  We've literally decided to sit in armed camps of self righteousness and dictate who is right who is wrong based off of our opinions or the "science" and anyone astride the middle is wrong, anyone not in our camp is ignorant etc.

 

There's no more room for debate and that's a pretty important thing for people to start looking at because at some point this virus will be put under wraps but the damage to the actual identity of the populace and our further move towards Americanism in our attitudes will continue

May I argue that that's partially a cultural thing and not necessarily something we can control? Outside looking in, the Japanese in general seem to have a more "responsible culture" overall who seem more willing to listen to such things such as vaccination mandates whereas here, people are easily polarized already just by political party alone without a pandemic to divide people up even more. The very fact that you immediately chose a side in this very debate while claiming there's "no room for debate" is also part of "our culture" if you think about it. Just as an aside, there always is room for debate btw no matter the topic, just some people are too closed-minded to accept any argument other than their own. ;)

 

Lancaster's post is an interesting thought for sure but, at the same time, I don't think it solves anything either. Simply put, we have a pandemic to solve and it's pretty evident that the only way to solve it at this point is to "encourage" people to vaccinate however that method may end up being.

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On 10/10/2021 at 10:29 AM, 4petesake said:


I went online to try to find this list of the 11000 doctors that signed this declaration. There isn’t one.  This is an online petition that anyone can sign. “Physician” is the default title in the “signing as” box. I could haven signed it as is and my name would have been added as a doctor.  I couldn’t find a single reputable news source that reported anything other than the Medical summit itself. Every site that reported on numbers for this petition had links to other sites like “Steve Bannon’s War Room.” That could be why Trump’s name would be brought up.

 

 

I'm a doctor!  I've seen every episode of ER & Doogie Howser!:P

Edited by NewbieCanuckFan
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1 hour ago, Warhippy said:

Lol, yes.  I 100% disagree with them and their statements and actions.

 

But the meat of the matter Lancaster brought up was the difference between Japan and Canada and how the respective populations are handling things.  That poster is not incorrect at all and it's actually eye opening because we ARE in fact that polarized along party/political/health lines.  We've literally decided to sit in armed camps of self righteousness and dictate who is right who is wrong based off of our opinions or the "science" and anyone astride the middle is wrong, anyone not in our camp is ignorant etc.

 

There's no more room for debate and that's a pretty important thing for people to start looking at because at some point this virus will be put under wraps but the damage to the actual identity of the populace and our further move towards Americanism in our attitudes will continue

The thing is, the turds at the top (like Dotard for example) are actually FULLY vaccinated (and most of them with real stroke on the right, jumped the queue to get vaccinated via their connections).  It's the schmucks that drink their Kool-Aid are the ones that aren't vaccinated.

 

Steve Jobs could've learn a thing or two about selling from Dotard.  The ultimate grifter.

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2 hours ago, Warhippy said:

Lol, yes.  I 100% disagree with them and their statements and actions.

 

But the meat of the matter Lancaster brought up was the difference between Japan and Canada and how the respective populations are handling things.  That poster is not incorrect at all and it's actually eye opening because we ARE in fact that polarized along party/political/health lines.  We've literally decided to sit in armed camps of self righteousness and dictate who is right who is wrong based off of our opinions or the "science" and anyone astride the middle is wrong, anyone not in our camp is ignorant etc.

 

There's no more room for debate and that's a pretty important thing for people to start looking at because at some point this virus will be put under wraps but the damage to the actual identity of the populace and our further move towards Americanism in our attitudes will continue

But how is it polarized when it's only about 10% of people against something? That's not polarized that's borderline fringe.

 

Some things have no room for debate. 

 

 

 

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On 10/11/2021 at 9:22 AM, JM_ said:

 

well, clearly there is some fundamental difference between Japan and Canada thats allowed Japan to have a less restrictive lockdown. I think you're actually making a good case for us not to folow Japan. If we can't handle more restrictions and have worse numbers, why the heck would we want to ease things up further?

 

Just curious - have you heard about any oddball protestors in Japan like we have in front of hospitals?

 

 

 

I think we should figure out what fundamental differences are there that are causing such different results.  They have higher density, they travel more on public transit, a more elderly population, privately owned health care facilitates that is funded by the government, etc.  All initial indicators would have all of us believe they should have it way worse than here.

In Canada and the US, they're treating the covid shots like some holy grail to solve all issues... yet it seems that the real solution is more nuanced.  There are probably numerous different variables in play.... personal hygiene, health, diet, water quality, etc.  

I really wish the powers that be can be upfront about it.  Instead of just running with the same mantra of "We BC do gud... we guuder than 'merika N alBertazz!".  I mean if I was in Japan, I would be assuming that with the way BC is handling Covid, that the hospitals must be treating patients with leeches, voodoo or something.  100 cases out of 30 million people in Tokyo.... what should that say about how we are handling it?

When government is acting with such adamant authority that their course of action is the correct one, in face of actual proof of other working strategies, that is most frightening.  It's no longer about doing what is best, it's about maintaining power.  

 

I have no idea regarding protestors in Japan.... but usually they're not too overly intrusive when they do protest (unlike in the West).    

That being said, I do know that hesitancy is a very common issue over there.

Most people I know there aren't vaccinated or are only vaccinated if their job requires it (eg. flight attendant, multi-national consultant, etc). 

None of my wife's family are vaccinated and it's not like they're some crazy right-wing religious crackpots living at some rural commune in Hokkaido.  Just the averaged educated people working in public education or business owners in Osaka.  My in-laws are somewhat local community leaders (or at least very active in community affairs), so it's safe to say many of their peers probably hold the same point of view of they do.  Considering my in-laws are those who survived WW2 (including being at Hiroshima) and all their siblings and peers are still alive and kicking during this covid pandemic, they must either be lucky or doing something right.  

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48 minutes ago, Lancaster said:

I think we should figure out what fundamental differences are there that are causing such different results.  They have higher density, they travel more on public transit, a more elderly population, privately owned health care facilitates that is funded by the government, etc.  All initial indicators would have all of us believe they should have it way worse than here.

In Canada and the US, they're treating the covid shots like some holy grail to solve all issues... yet it seems that the real solution is more nuanced.  There are probably numerous different variables in play.... personal hygiene, health, diet, water quality, etc.  

I really wish the powers that be can be upfront about it.  Instead of just running with the same mantra of "We BC do gud... we guuder than 'merika N alBertazz!".  I mean if I was in Japan, I would be assuming that with the way BC is handling Covid, that the hospitals must be treating patients with leeches, voodoo or something.  100 cases out of 30 million people in Tokyo.... what should that say about how we are handling it?

When government is acting with such adamant authority that their course of action is the correct one, in face of actual proof of other working strategies, that is most frightening.  It's no longer about doing what is best, it's about maintaining power.  

 

I have no idea regarding protestors in Japan.... but usually they're not too overly intrusive when they do protest (unlike in the West).    

That being said, I do know that hesitancy is a very common issue over there.

Most people I know there aren't vaccinated or are only vaccinated if their job requires it (eg. flight attendant, multi-national consultant, etc). 

None of my wife's family are vaccinated and it's not like they're some crazy right-wing religious crackpots living at some rural commune in Hokkaido.  Just the averaged educated people working in public education or business owners in Osaka.  My in-laws are somewhat local community leaders (or at least very active in community affairs), so it's safe to say many of their peers probably hold the same point of view of they do.  Considering my in-laws are those who survived WW2 (including being at Hiroshima) and all their siblings and peers are still alive and kicking during this covid pandemic, they must either be lucky or doing something right.  

I think the problem is though you're comparing 2 very different cultures with each other. Are you expecting us to fit in the mold of another culture? Consider that even what is consider a snack in Japan is much healthier than what is considered a snack here, so obviously their population's going to be healthier than our population in general.

 

So then what exactly does "figuring out the fundamental differences" solve for us? You said it yourself that things are very different over there with the density, the mentality, etc; therefore, what they're doing over there is highly unlikely to be as effective over here because of that difference.

 

I get that you mean well but our problem isn't going to be solved by fitting us into a mold of another culture. If anything, that's going the opposite direction and creating new problems as more ideals get forced on people than just vaccines.

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Another piece about the origins.  I kinda like the summation about the two "sides".

 

The lab leakers tend to be more interested in biosecurity, transparency, and human hubris. They exhibit an admirable drive to follow the money, to upend centralized power, to overturn academic hierarchy, and to expose the injustices of oppressive governments. Some are China hawks. By and large, they have not done virus-hunting field or lab work.

 

On the natural-origin side, most people have done the kind of field and lab work that the W.I.V. pursued—and are regularly bowled over by nature’s endless diversity. They believe in scientific precedent, as opposed to uncertainties that have yet to be resolved. Many people in this camp have devoted their careers to conservation, biodiversity, and public health, and have been warning about a future pandemic for years. Spillovers most often happen because of land-use change, or human encroachment into previously wild places, which is happening on pretty much the entire planet, but particularly in areas that are developing rapidly, like south China and southeast Asia.

 

https://www.newyorker.com/science/elements/the-mysterious-case-of-the-covid-19-lab-leak-theory

The Mysterious Case of the COVID-19 Lab-Leak Theory

Did the virus spring from nature or from human error?

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, The Lock said:

I think the problem is though you're comparing 2 very different cultures with each other. Are you expecting us to fit in the mold of another culture? Consider that even what is consider a snack in Japan is much healthier than what is considered a snack here, so obviously their population's going to be healthier than our population in general.

 

So then what exactly does "figuring out the fundamental differences" solve for us? You said it yourself that things are very different over there with the density, the mentality, etc; therefore, what they're doing over there is highly unlikely to be as effective over here because of that difference.

 

I get that you mean well but our problem isn't going to be solved by fitting us into a mold of another culture. If anything, that's going the opposite direction and creating new problems as more ideals get forced on people than just vaccines.

So is covid infection a cultural issue then?  

From the beginning we've been told to social distance, the elder to stay away from others, wear masks, avoid grouping up for transit, etc.... all those things which BC has an edge over Japan at, but has worse results.

 

When I mean "be like Japan", I don't mean you need to change culture, just mirror what they have been doing in handling the coronavirus.  They've been doing more or less the opposite as here and they've slowed down infection rate and have way less death than Canada, even though they are like 3-4x the population.  They're doing something right and Canada is probably doing something wrong.  

 

Of course nutrition and diet is hard to fix overnight.  It's true that the average junk food in Japan is not as bad on your body compared to those in the West ($3 rice bowl in Sukiya is way healthier than $3 burger from McDonalds).... but then it circles back to personal health being the largest contributing factor in dealing with covid.  Why aren't there more focus on what we can do here locally and now?  I mean if everybody ate an apple per day, drink a protein shake, have a glass of OJ, take some Flintstone vitamin pills and have a healthier diet; plus everyone should walk at least 30-60 minutes daily, it would probably be more effective in handling Covid in the long-term.  Yet it's pretty much treated as misinformation if you mention it, but why is that?  In every other scenario with every other ailment, your doctor will probably say to eat right and exercise.  

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9 minutes ago, Lancaster said:

So is covid infection a cultural issue then?  

From the beginning we've been told to social distance, the elder to stay away from others, wear masks, avoid grouping up for transit, etc.... all those things which BC has an edge over Japan at, but has worse results.

 

When I mean "be like Japan", I don't mean you need to change culture, just mirror what they have been doing in handling the coronavirus.  They've been doing more or less the opposite as here and they've slowed down infection rate and have way less death than Canada, even though they are like 3-4x the population.  They're doing something right and Canada is probably doing something wrong.  

 

Of course nutrition and diet is hard to fix overnight.  It's true that the average junk food in Japan is not as bad on your body compared to those in the West ($3 rice bowl in Sukiya is way healthier than $3 burger from McDonalds).... but then it circles back to personal health being the largest contributing factor in dealing with covid.  Why aren't there more focus on what we can do here locally and now?  I mean if everybody ate an apple per day, drink a protein shake, have a glass of OJ, take some Flintstone vitamin pills and have a healthier diet; plus everyone should walk at least 30-60 minutes daily, it would probably be more effective in handling Covid in the long-term.  Yet it's pretty much treated as misinformation if you mention it, but why is that?  In every other scenario with every other ailment, your doctor will probably say to eat right and exercise.  

The covid infection itself isn't the cultural issue. How people react to is based on culture however is a cultual issue. What's going to work in one culture isn't necessarily going to work in other cultures, and this needs to be considered when doing these comparisons. Mirroring what one culture's doing is not a gaurentee to work. If anything, it's far from that.

 

Let me ask you this: what exactly do you propose we do to get healthier if that's the underlying issue? Health has not only been an issue for decades, but has been getting progressively worse due to higher rates of obesity and an aging population. This isn't a problem you simply solve; therefore, how do you expect this to get solved in the short term for covid purposes? Keep in mind this is the same population with people against vaccines, masks, social distancing, etc...

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Just now, The Lock said:

The covid infection itself isn't the cultural issue. How people react to is based on culture however is a cultual issue. What's going to work in one culture isn't necessarily going to work in other cultures, and this needs to be considered when doing these comparisons. Mirroring what one culture's doing is not a gaurentee to work. If anything, it's far from that.

 

Let me ask you this: what exactly do you propose we do to get healthier if that's the underlying issue? Health has not only been an issue for decades, but has been getting progressively worse due to higher rates of obesity and an aging population. This isn't a problem you simply solve; therefore, how do you expect this to get solved in the short term for covid purposes?

If health is the fundamental issue, why the need to push the vaccine to a population that generally wouldn't need it?  Shouldn't the vaccine to be provided to those in a higher risks categories like the elderly and those with chronic issues then?  Why the rush to push the vaccine to those who are under-25 and to kids, the group least likely to be severely impacted by the coronavirus (according to the stats)?

 

As for solving the short-term...

Have government vouchers provided to each household for over-the-counter vitamin pills, NAC, vouchers for fruits and vegetables, subsidized organic products, tax rebate on fitness products, health products becoming tax deductible, etc.  Wouldn't really help in the immediate short-term, but probably see more noticeable results in the medium term and longer term.  Have junk food requiring minimal nutritional standards or at least having the reduction of salt, unhealthy fats, less processed stuff, etc.  

I mean Japan imports the majority of their food and Canada is a breadbasket... yet Canada is unable to provide sufficient healthy food for it's own populace?

My suggestions won't solve everything... but is definitely a foot on the right direction.  

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Just now, Lancaster said:

If health is the fundamental issue, why the need to push the vaccine to a population that generally wouldn't need it?  Shouldn't the vaccine to be provided to those in a higher risks categories like the elderly and those with chronic issues then?  Why the rush to push the vaccine to those who are under-25 and to kids, the group least likely to be severely impacted by the coronavirus (according to the stats)?

 

As for solving the short-term...

Have government vouchers provided to each household for over-the-counter vitamin pills, NAC, vouchers for fruits and vegetables, subsidized organic products, tax rebate on fitness products, health products becoming tax deductible, etc.  Wouldn't really help in the immediate short-term, but probably see more noticeable results in the medium term and longer term.  Have junk food requiring minimal nutritional standards or at least having the reduction of salt, unhealthy fats, less processed stuff, etc.  

I mean Japan imports the majority of their food and Canada is a breadbasket... yet Canada is unable to provide sufficient healthy food for it's own populace?

My suggestions won't solve everything... but is definitely a foot on the right direction.  

I mean, you're the one proposing health is the fundamental issue. I'm asking how would you solve it if this is the case. I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with it either I might add. I think there's point for and against that thought.

 

The way I see it, we don't really know who is going to need the vaccine and who isn't. We have our ideas on who might (ie. older people, people with underlying health conditions, etc) but even that isn't really enough to accurately figure that out. Not only that, but as time progresses, this virus is just going to get worse as it mutates. We've already seen how bad the delta variant can get in the non-vaccinated. Imagine what things would have been like had there been no vaccine to this date.

 

Then there's the transmission of the virus. The kids 25 and younger, while less likely to be as affected by the virus, can still share it around. Getting them vaccinated helps prevent this from happening. It's about giving the virus as many "dead end points' as possible.

 

For what it's worthI agree with some of your points with the health stuff (although vitamin pills are kind of snake oil in my opinion, that's a discussion for another day). The question would be with the effectiveness of it. People often stick with what they know; therefore, it's not exactly easy to make people change their ways. Making this easier could help, but then the people also have to want help for this to even work.

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15 minutes ago, The Lock said:

I mean, you're the one proposing health is the fundamental issue. I'm asking how would you solve it if this is the case. I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with it either I might add. I think there's point for and against that thought.

 

The way I see it, we don't really know who is going to need the vaccine and who isn't. We have our ideas on who might (ie. older people, people with underlying health conditions, etc) but even that isn't really enough to accurately figure that out. Not only that, but as time progresses, this virus is just going to get worse as it mutates. We've already seen how bad the delta variant can get in the non-vaccinated. Imagine what things would have been like had there been no vaccine to this date.

 

Then there's the transmission of the virus. The kids 25 and younger, while less likely to be as affected by the virus, can still share it around. Getting them vaccinated helps prevent this from happening. It's about giving the virus as many "dead end points' as possible.

 

For what it's worthI agree with some of your points with the health stuff (although vitamin pills are kind of snake oil in my opinion, that's a discussion for another day). The question would be with the effectiveness of it. People often stick with what they know; therefore, it's not exactly easy to make people change their ways. Making this easier could help, but then the people also have to want help for this to even work.

Yep, just throwing ideas out.  I'm no health expert, I don't know if the vaccine is really the right course or not, but perhaps I'm just instinctually a skeptic.  I see Japan doing it better, we as a society should be replicating their model more.  We should be expecting our government to really figure things out, rather than just rolling out restrictions and setting up nearly irreversible situation that is dividing people.  

 

I'm not a huge fan of vitamin pills, but they do play a role in those who are unable to get their full nutrients via their regular diet.  Great for kids who hates their fruits and veggies, lol.  Plus vitamins has been around for decades, there's way less hesitancy as the "long-term impact" is well established.  

Having healthy food that's affordable would really help going forward.  Like when Whole Foods is selling 1 organic apple for $1.... that is creating a barrier to many. 

 

There are way too many unknowns out there or stuff that needs further research.  I'm not expert here, but the delta strain (I'm assuming also future strains) can still be caught and spread by those vaccinated, while their symptoms are more muted, but wouldn't only the strongest viral mutations survive and thus spread again?  Kind of like how doctors say to follow the exact instructions when taking anti-biotics as the bacteria keep getting stronger each generation... is it similar with viruses?  

Then there's some early studies about how natural immunity and especially if you caught covid previously is vastly superior to vaccine immunity.  Perhaps that's why Japan is doing better?  Their infection rates were extremely high (by their standards), but death rates really low... thus maybe they have achieved better herd immunity than here?

Seems more prudence to wait for the more facts rather than using incomplete data sets and implementing rules and regulations that's undeniably intrusive.  

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So for going on 3 days now I haven't felt great.

I'm double vaxxed and my symptoms are mild. But there is something.. achy, a little warm, mild headache, not much energy, really lousy sleeps.

 

I did the self evaluation on line and it said to get tested. So I thought, I should do the right thing a be on the safe side.

 

What a joke. 

 

Island health are on a call back basis, was told by the recording I will be getting called back in 24 hrs, maybe more due to volume. Then I will get an appointment, then the results will take 1-3 days. Oh and the closest clinic closes at 3:40 for some reason.

 

I see very little people, I work mostly by myself outdoors. I rarely get sick. I'm starting to just think about waiting to see if the symptoms reduce as it feels like a very mild flu. 

 

I have lost any faith in tracking/testing in BC. I imagine our covid numbers could be way higher. With the news saying that the regular cold and flu are going around, I could see vaxxed people like myself not caring to go through all the waiting for a test. 

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Lancaster said:

Yep, just throwing ideas out.  I'm no health expert, I don't know if the vaccine is really the right course or not, but perhaps I'm just instinctually a skeptic.  I see Japan doing it better, we as a society should be replicating their model more.  We should be expecting our government to really figure things out, rather than just rolling out restrictions and setting up nearly irreversible situation that is dividing people.  

 

I'm not a huge fan of vitamin pills, but they do play a role in those who are unable to get their full nutrients via their regular diet.  Great for kids who hates their fruits and veggies, lol.  Plus vitamins has been around for decades, there's way less hesitancy as the "long-term impact" is well established.  

Having healthy food that's affordable would really help going forward.  Like when Whole Foods is selling 1 organic apple for $1.... that is creating a barrier to many. 

 

There are way too many unknowns out there or stuff that needs further research.  I'm not expert here, but the delta strain (I'm assuming also future strains) can still be caught and spread by those vaccinated, while their symptoms are more muted, but wouldn't only the strongest viral mutations survive and thus spread again?  Kind of like how doctors say to follow the exact instructions when taking anti-biotics as the bacteria keep getting stronger each generation... is it similar with viruses?  

Then there's some early studies about how natural immunity and especially if you caught covid previously is vastly superior to vaccine immunity.  Perhaps that's why Japan is doing better?  Their infection rates were extremely high (by their standards), but death rates really low... thus maybe they have achieved better herd immunity than here?

Seems more prudence to wait for the more facts rather than using incomplete data sets and implementing rules and regulations that's undeniably intrusive.  

You said it brother!!!

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https://globalnews.ca/news/8260353/bc-covid-19-event-capacity-limits/?utm_source=GlobalBC&utm_medium=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3D93dVva9RI9eymGZY8LkWRn8EvB0Nl-iY7cgOex7WurshPt6gIf3f-E4

B.C. to decide on COVID-19 event capacity changes by end of this week

The province will decide by the end of this week whether it intends to change the capacity limits for organized events held during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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British Columbia is one of the last provinces in Canada with guest number restrictions in place for events like weddings, hockey games, concerts, and theatre performances.

Those rules are now under review, said Dr. Bonnie Henry, as the deadline for requiring proof of double vaccination at events approaches.

“Our intent was always, when the full vaccine card came into effect, that we would be able to go 100 per cent capacity and take away some of the other restrictions we have around some events, like dancing and remaining seated,” said Dr. Henry, the provincial health officer, in a Tuesday press briefing.

She said officials are examining the epidemiological situation in parts of the province where this might not be in effect. “The situation in the north comes to mind,” she said. “We will be making a decision about that by the end of this week.”

Beginning Oct. 24, provincial health orders mandate that event organizers must obtain vaccine card proof of double vaccination, and deny entry to those who can’t produce it.

Those rules remain in effect for the length of an event, such as a multi-day sporting tournament.

Right now, a maximum of 50 people, or 50 per cent of a venue’s capacity, can attend organized indoor “seated events.” Indoor fairs and trade shows in which guests are walking and browsing can be held at 100 per cent venue capacity.

Organized outdoor seated gatherings can be held with a maximum of 5,000 people or up to 50 per cent of a venue’s capacity, while walk-through fairs and festivals can use 100 per cent of venue capacity.

As it stands, vaccine cards are required to enter indoor ticketed sporting events with more than 50 people, and indoor concerts, theatre, dance and symphony events with more than 50 people.

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B.C. COVID-19 pandemic update:

 

As of Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, 88.8% (4,117,400) of eligible people 12 and older in B.C. have received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine and 82.6% (3,830,063) received their second dose.

 

In addition, 89.3% (3,862,332) of all eligible adults in B.C. have received their first dose and 83.3% (3,604,199) received their second dose.

 

Over a four-day period, B.C. is reporting 2,090 new cases of COVID-19, including four epi-linked cases, for a total of 194,581 cases in the province:

  • Oct. 8-9: 603 new cases
  • Oct. 9-10: 634 new cases
  • Oct. 10-11: 468 new cases
  • Oct. 11-12: 385 new cases

There are 5,183 active cases of COVID-19 in the province and 186,955 people who tested positive have recovered. Of the active cases, 357 individuals are in hospital and 153 are in intensive care. The remaining people are recovering at home in self-isolation.

 

Note: Intensive care numbers are a subset of the total in hospital. They are not in addition to the number of people in hospital.

 

The new/active cases include:

  • 814 new cases in Fraser Health
    • Total active cases: 2,182
  • 229 new cases in Vancouver Coastal Health
    • Total active cases: 647
  • 404 new cases in Interior Health
    • Total active cases: 841
  • 351 new cases in Northern Health
    • Total active cases: 833
  • 292 new cases in Island Health
    • Total active cases: 622
  • No new cases of people who reside outside of Canada
    • Total active cases: 58

In the past 96 hours, 28 new deaths have been reported, for an overall total of 2,029.

 

The new deaths include:

  • Fraser Health: five
  • Vancouver Coastal Health: three
  • Interior Health: eight
  • Northern Health: seven
  • Island Health: five

There have been two new health-care facility outbreaks at West Shore Laylum and Evergreen Manor (Fraser Health), for a total of 19 active outbreaks, including:

long-term care:

  • Willingdon Care Centre, Westminster House, The Residence in Mission, Magnolia Gardens, Manoah Manor, Good Samaritan Delta View Care Centre, Cherington Place, West Shore Laylum (Fraser Health);
  • Cottonwoods Care Centre, Joseph Creek Care Village, Overlander, Village by the Station, Haven Hill Retirement Centre (Interior Health); and
  • Wrinch Memorial Hospital (Northern Health).

acute care:

  • Mission Memorial Hospital (Fraser Health); and
  • University Hospital of Northern BC (Northern Health).
  • assisted or independent living:
  • Sunset Manor, Evergreen Manor (Fraser Health); and
  • Cooper Place (Vancouver Coastal Health).

The workplace and communal-living outbreak at Fort St. John – Site C (Northern Health) has been declared over.

 

From Oct. 4-10, people not fully vaccinated accounted for 68.1% of cases and from Sept. 27-Oct. 10, they accounted for 73.7% of hospitalizations.

 

Past week cases (Oct. 4-10) – Total 4,341

  • Not vaccinated: 2,649 (61.0%)
  • Partially vaccinated: 310 (7.1%)
  • Fully vaccinated: 1,382 (31.8%)

Past two weeks cases hospitalized (Sept. 27-Oct. 10) – Total 383

  • Not vaccinated: 253 (66.1%)
  • Partially vaccinated: 29 (7.6%)
  • Fully vaccinated: 101 (26.4%)

Past week, cases per 100,000 population after adjusting for age (Oct. 4-10)    

  • Not vaccinated: 281.3
  • Partially vaccinated: 84.4
  • Fully vaccinated: 33.1

Past two weeks, cases hospitalized per 100,000 population after adjusting for age (Sept. 27-Oct. 10)

  • Not vaccinated: 40.3
  • Partially vaccinated: 12.3
  • Fully vaccinated: 2.3

Since December 2020, the Province has administered 7,978,015 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines.

 

Update for visitors to long-term care, assisted-living and acute-care facilities:

 

Starting Oct. 12, all visitors to long-term care and assisted-living facilities will need to show proof they have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

 

Starting Oct. 26, all visitors to long-term care, assisted-living and acute-care facilities will need to show proof they are fully vaccinated with two doses of COVID-19 vaccine. Those who are not vaccinated will not be able to visit in these high-risk settings (excluding children 12 or under or those with an approved medical exemption).

 

https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021HLTH0178-001960

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4 minutes ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

Some of us just listen to them and reiterate what they tell us. Others question and obfuscate. 

Questioning is very important, especially when there are jurisdictions with different strategies and different results.  

If outcome is uniform or predictable, there wouldn't be much to question.  

As it currently is, there are way more questions that needs to be asked and questions that needs to be answered.  

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