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2 hours ago, UnkNuk said:

From the article:

 

"The data have not yet been peer-reviewed or published."

 

Not that I don't trust pharmaceutical companies but it is in Pfizer's coroporate interest to promote/sell as many of these shots as they can.  I think I'll wait until other authorities have had a chance to study the data.

 

And it if it is accurate, by all means let's go.

 

 

 

2 hours ago, King Heffy said:

I don't disagree, but I'd rather roll the dice with another dose of a vaccine I've taken than the Delta variant.  I'll be taking my booster at soon as it's offered to me.

I agree with King....I've already taken 2 Pfizer shots. I don't really see a downside to a third, if it's offered by a medical professional....

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20 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

 

I agree with King....I've already taken 2 Pfizer shots. I don't really see a downside to a third, if it's offered by a medical professional....

I wasn't thinking of the health aspects of a third shot, I was thinking of the financial costs.  Is it really surprising that a drug company (or any other company) will come out and say people should use as much of their product as possible?

 

Let's wait for the results to be independently verified to ensure that we're getting a bang for our (taxpayer's) buck.

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1 hour ago, nuckin_futz said:

B.C. declares COVID-19 outbreak in Central Okanagan, reimposes mask mandate

British Columbia is declaring a COVID-19 outbreak in the Central Okanagan after a rapid rise in cases in the region and is reimposing a local mask mandate, as well as other public health measures.

 

More than half of B.C.'s daily and active COVID-19 cases are concentrated in the area, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said Wednesday during a teleconference.

 

"We are concerned in public health about the rapid increase in the Central Okanagan, particularly around the Kelowna area," said Henry, who was joined by Health Minister Adrian Dix and Dr. Sue Pollock, chief medical health officer for Interior Health.

 

Under the new health order, masks will be mandatory as of midnight in indoor public spaces and are being encouraged  outdoors when people cannot physically distance themselves.

Travel discouraged 

Travel to and from the region, which includes Kelowna, West Kelowna, Peachland and Lake Country, is also being strongly discouraged unless individuals are fully immunized.

"It's time to slow down and step back to protect our community," Pollock said at the teleconference.

 

She said the region will also be reducing the interval between first and second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to 28 days.

 

A return to normal for gatherings was announced on July 1 as part of Step 3 of the province's restart plan, but Pollock said it's recommended that people in the Okanagan avoid indoor gatherings in favour of outdoor.

 

She said the new cases in Interior Health since July 1 have primarily involved people who are 20 to 40 years old and those who are not fully vaccinated.

 

Henry said the spread of the delta variant in the area is especially concerning, but she believes the new measures will help flatten the spike in numbers.

 

"Because of the good work we have all done, I am confident that the measures that we are going to take will stop people from getting sick and will prevent ongoing transmission," she said.

meanwhile here in Alberta.........

 

Bell: Kenney, COVID and no apology for a mask-free Stampede | Calgary Sun

Edited by MikeBossy
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2 hours ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Which university are you with?  UBC's AMS (student society) just lambasted the university administration for doing the bare minimum while returning to "normal".  Good on them for standing up for the students (and faculty members).

The big one in the valley. That's who they're following and I guess their approach is to do effectively nothing because we're doing nothing in turn. Thousands of students, staff in close quarters, masks aren't mandatory, no vaccination requirements, unclear what the protocol is if someone in the department does get the corona. When the expression a "return to normal" is used, they literally mean it in this regard. 

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WOW just WOW:

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-to-remove-most-covid-19-isolation-testing-requirements-by-mid-august-1.6121002

 

Alberta to remove most COVID-19 isolation, testing requirements by mid-August

Changes will occur in two-phases: Phase 1 starts July 29, Phase 2 in mid-August

Nicholas Frew · CBC News · Posted: Jul 28, 2021 11:52 AM MT | Last Updated: 4 hours ago
 
dr-deena-hinshaw-june-29.jpg
Alberta's health-care system has to start preparing for other health challenges, such as the seasonal flu, said chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw. (Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
876
comments

Albertans who test positive for COVID-19 will no longer be required to enter isolation starting in less than three weeks, the province's chief medical officer of health said Wednesday.

The change is among a raft of public health amendments that are designed to help the health-care system respond to other emerging medical issues such as seasonal influenza, said Dr. Deena Hinshaw during a news conference. 

 

While a recent rise in COVID-19 cases has caused some anxiety, increasing vaccination rates are limiting the threat of severe outcomes and strains on the health-care system, she said. 

As a result, the province will start transitioning COVID-19 protocols to be similar to those of the flu and other communicable diseases.

"When we first heard of COVID-19, we knew little of the virus and we had no treatments and no vaccines … Today, we are in a very different place," said Hinshaw.

"Vaccines are able to drastically reduce the risk of not only contracting the virus, but more importantly, getting severely ill. From a public health standpoint, this has changed how we need to look at the virus."

Alberta's health-care system has to start preparing for other health challenges, such as the seasonal flu, said Hinshaw, citing that there were zero cases identified last fall but officials expect that to change.

Changes to certain COVID-19 rules and protocols will take place in two phases, and they will be implemented over a period of a few weeks. 

Starting Thursday, anyone with COVID-19 symptoms or who received a positive test result must isolate. The quarantine period for their close contacts, however, will shift from mandatory to recommended, a government release says.

That all changes on August 16 in Phase 2 when isolation following a positive test will no longer be required. It is still strongly recommended, Hinshaw said. 

Quarantine could be required in some "high-risk settings or for outbreak management," Hinshaw noted.

Anyone who isn't fully immunized should avoid public places for two weeks, she added.

Anyone who tests positive will be notified, but contact tracers will no longer notify close contacts of exposure. That responsibility will fall to those who test positive for the illness.

 
edm-Hinshaw-COVIDnotgoingaway-WEB-July28
 

Alberta reduces COVID-19 measures, cites need to focus on all respiratory infections

6 hours ago
1:41
Noting that “we will be needing to live with this virus for years to come,” Dr. Deena Hinshaw says it's time for the health system focus on the wide range of respiratory infections that affect Albertans. 1:41

Contact tracers will keep investigating cases at high-risk settings, such as acute and continuing care facilities.

Outbreak management will also focus on high-risk settings, including "high-risk workplaces." Community outbreaks with a surge of severe outcomes will "be addressed as needed," the release says.

Asymptomatic testing will no longer be recommended, but testing will remain available to people showing symptoms.

"This will help reduce wait times and ensure timely results in the coming months," said Hinshaw.

Mask mandates remain in effect when inside acute and continuing care facilities, or when riding in public transit, taxis or ride-share vehicles.

Officials will monitor the impact these changes have and adapt them as needed over the next two weeks, Hinshaw said.

Universal masking will not be required in schools once students return, Hinshaw said, but masks can be used as a temporary outbreak intervention in response to respiratory outbreaks. 

COVID-19 testing, provincial monitoring, outbreak management in high-risk settings "and other key measures" will remain in place, the release says.

Isolation hotels and quarantine supports will no longer be available as of the start of Phase 2. COVID-19 testing will continue to be available for Albertans with symptoms "when it is needed to help direct patient care decisions," the release says.

Phase 2 slated to begin in mid-August

Phase 2 of the province's transition is slated for Aug. 16, at which time most COVID-19 protocols will be lifted.

Mask mandates will be lifted, though some may be required in acute or continuing care facilities.

The province says masks won't be mandatory at schools, but could be recommended for temporary outbreak intervention. A document to guide back-to-school is being drafted and will be released mid-August.

 
student-mask.jpg
Masks will not be mandatory to be worn in schools as of Aug. 16, the Alberta government announced Wednesday. (City of Vaughan)

Isolating after a positive COVID-19 test will no longer be required, but "strongly recommended," the release says. People with symptoms of any respiratory infection should still stay home until symptoms are gone.

Isolation hotels and quarantine support will no longer be available.

Testing will be available to people with symptoms when it's needed to direct patient care decisions.

It will be available through assessment centres until Aug. 31, then primary care facilities such as doctors offices after that. Anyone with severe illness that needs urgent or emergency care can be tested in acute care facilities and hospitals.

COVID-19 testing will be offered in high-risk outbreaks, such as in continuing care facilities and outbreak management and preventative measures will stay focused on outbreaks in high-risk settings, it says.

The government said public health will focus on investigating severe outcomes that require hospitalization, as well as any COVID-19 deaths.

A wastewater baseline testing program will be launched during Phase 2 to see the trends in various regions and monitor coronavirus variants of concerns.

"Testing wastewater has proven to be an accurate and valuable tool in providing early warning of a possible rise in cases," Hinshaw said.

194 new COVID-19 cases reported Tuesday

Alberta public health officials are reporting 194 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday — most of which are people who have not received the COVID-19 vaccine, said Hinshaw.

Since Tuesday, two more people are being treated for COVID-19 in hospital, but three patients were removed from the intensive care unit. There are 84 hospitalizations, including 18 in ICU as of Wednesday.

There were about 7,100 tests conducted Tuesday and Alberta's test-positivity rate is 2.9 per cent.

Of Albertans aged 12 and up, 75.6 per cent have received one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine; 64.3 per cent have received both doses, according to a news release issued by the Alberta government.

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9 hours ago, 6of1_halfdozenofother said:

Yes, except in a role where trust and integrity is an imperative, by trying to pull things fast and loose not only insults the intelligence of the people she's supposed to inform and serve, it strikes to the very heart of trust in the position (and in health expertise/science in general) and the integrity of the office.

 

Better to be forthright and expect flak than to pretend science is driving a political decision and being seen through for what it really is.

 

Same thing as when Fauci said masks don't work then later admitting to lying to the public about it purposely. (When a realistic solution was just tell people to make their own face coverings, ala scarves/bandana's/exc. which many ended up doing anyways) 

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Are these vaccines going to be good against further variants, beyond Delta? As I see there's already speculation there may need to be more doses.

 

Doesn't seem like covid's going anywhere, if it keeps mutating to survive may we need more vaccines/doses? Or is herd immunity strong enough to ward off further variants?

 

 

 

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Smashian Kassian said:

Are these vaccines going to be good against further variants, beyond Delta? As I see there's already speculation there may need to be more doses.

 

Doesn't seem like covid's going anywhere, if it keeps mutating to survive may we need more vaccines/doses? Or is herd immunity strong enough to ward off further variants?

 

 

 

 

 

mRNA vaccines are really, really good. They get your body to identify and build an immunity to a disease by giving them the blueprints to the virus. Even if variants aren't identical with their spike protein, there is enough similarity in them that the body does create a response and recognize the variants as foreign in fully vaccinated individuals. If we could get every human an mRNA vaccine and two doses COVID would be gone in a week. But that's not feasible right now even if everyone was willing.

 

People think vaccines aren't as powerful as they really are because recently, they've only been vaccinated against the flu, which is really really hard to vaccinate against because of influenza's unique characteristics.

Edited by Kurgom
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19 hours ago, Ghostsof1915 said:

Two shots of Pfizer. But man, did the second shot do a number on me. I'm still feeling effects 5 days later. 

So if it helps with the Delta variant that's ok. 

(I was confused because the nurses desk said Moderna, but my card and email says Pfizer)

 

Me too.  The brain fog is still enough that I'm not completely sure I'm ok to drive.

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10 hours ago, MikeBossy said:

WOW just WOW:

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-to-remove-most-covid-19-isolation-testing-requirements-by-mid-august-1.6121002

 

Alberta to remove most COVID-19 isolation, testing requirements by mid-August

Changes will occur in two-phases: Phase 1 starts July 29, Phase 2 in mid-August

Nicholas Frew · CBC News · Posted: Jul 28, 2021 11:52 AM MT | Last Updated: 4 hours ago
 
dr-deena-hinshaw-june-29.jpg
Alberta's health-care system has to start preparing for other health challenges, such as the seasonal flu, said chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw. (Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
876
comments

Albertans who test positive for COVID-19 will no longer be required to enter isolation starting in less than three weeks, the province's chief medical officer of health said Wednesday.

The change is among a raft of public health amendments that are designed to help the health-care system respond to other emerging medical issues such as seasonal influenza, said Dr. Deena Hinshaw during a news conference. 

 

While a recent rise in COVID-19 cases has caused some anxiety, increasing vaccination rates are limiting the threat of severe outcomes and strains on the health-care system, she said. 

As a result, the province will start transitioning COVID-19 protocols to be similar to those of the flu and other communicable diseases.

"When we first heard of COVID-19, we knew little of the virus and we had no treatments and no vaccines … Today, we are in a very different place," said Hinshaw.

"Vaccines are able to drastically reduce the risk of not only contracting the virus, but more importantly, getting severely ill. From a public health standpoint, this has changed how we need to look at the virus."

Alberta's health-care system has to start preparing for other health challenges, such as the seasonal flu, said Hinshaw, citing that there were zero cases identified last fall but officials expect that to change.

Changes to certain COVID-19 rules and protocols will take place in two phases, and they will be implemented over a period of a few weeks. 

Starting Thursday, anyone with COVID-19 symptoms or who received a positive test result must isolate. The quarantine period for their close contacts, however, will shift from mandatory to recommended, a government release says.

That all changes on August 16 in Phase 2 when isolation following a positive test will no longer be required. It is still strongly recommended, Hinshaw said. 

Quarantine could be required in some "high-risk settings or for outbreak management," Hinshaw noted.

Anyone who isn't fully immunized should avoid public places for two weeks, she added.

Anyone who tests positive will be notified, but contact tracers will no longer notify close contacts of exposure. That responsibility will fall to those who test positive for the illness.

 
edm-Hinshaw-COVIDnotgoingaway-WEB-July28
 

Alberta reduces COVID-19 measures, cites need to focus on all respiratory infections

6 hours ago
1:41
Noting that “we will be needing to live with this virus for years to come,” Dr. Deena Hinshaw says it's time for the health system focus on the wide range of respiratory infections that affect Albertans. 1:41

Contact tracers will keep investigating cases at high-risk settings, such as acute and continuing care facilities.

Outbreak management will also focus on high-risk settings, including "high-risk workplaces." Community outbreaks with a surge of severe outcomes will "be addressed as needed," the release says.

Asymptomatic testing will no longer be recommended, but testing will remain available to people showing symptoms.

"This will help reduce wait times and ensure timely results in the coming months," said Hinshaw.

Mask mandates remain in effect when inside acute and continuing care facilities, or when riding in public transit, taxis or ride-share vehicles.

Officials will monitor the impact these changes have and adapt them as needed over the next two weeks, Hinshaw said.

Universal masking will not be required in schools once students return, Hinshaw said, but masks can be used as a temporary outbreak intervention in response to respiratory outbreaks. 

COVID-19 testing, provincial monitoring, outbreak management in high-risk settings "and other key measures" will remain in place, the release says.

Isolation hotels and quarantine supports will no longer be available as of the start of Phase 2. COVID-19 testing will continue to be available for Albertans with symptoms "when it is needed to help direct patient care decisions," the release says.

Phase 2 slated to begin in mid-August

Phase 2 of the province's transition is slated for Aug. 16, at which time most COVID-19 protocols will be lifted.

Mask mandates will be lifted, though some may be required in acute or continuing care facilities.

The province says masks won't be mandatory at schools, but could be recommended for temporary outbreak intervention. A document to guide back-to-school is being drafted and will be released mid-August.

 
student-mask.jpg
Masks will not be mandatory to be worn in schools as of Aug. 16, the Alberta government announced Wednesday. (City of Vaughan)

Isolating after a positive COVID-19 test will no longer be required, but "strongly recommended," the release says. People with symptoms of any respiratory infection should still stay home until symptoms are gone.

Isolation hotels and quarantine support will no longer be available.

Testing will be available to people with symptoms when it's needed to direct patient care decisions.

It will be available through assessment centres until Aug. 31, then primary care facilities such as doctors offices after that. Anyone with severe illness that needs urgent or emergency care can be tested in acute care facilities and hospitals.

COVID-19 testing will be offered in high-risk outbreaks, such as in continuing care facilities and outbreak management and preventative measures will stay focused on outbreaks in high-risk settings, it says.

The government said public health will focus on investigating severe outcomes that require hospitalization, as well as any COVID-19 deaths.

A wastewater baseline testing program will be launched during Phase 2 to see the trends in various regions and monitor coronavirus variants of concerns.

"Testing wastewater has proven to be an accurate and valuable tool in providing early warning of a possible rise in cases," Hinshaw said.

194 new COVID-19 cases reported Tuesday

Alberta public health officials are reporting 194 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday — most of which are people who have not received the COVID-19 vaccine, said Hinshaw.

Since Tuesday, two more people are being treated for COVID-19 in hospital, but three patients were removed from the intensive care unit. There are 84 hospitalizations, including 18 in ICU as of Wednesday.

There were about 7,100 tests conducted Tuesday and Alberta's test-positivity rate is 2.9 per cent.

Of Albertans aged 12 and up, 75.6 per cent have received one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine; 64.3 per cent have received both doses, according to a news release issued by the Alberta government.

Really wish we could close off the provincial border to keep these people out.

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16 hours ago, MikeBossy said:

meanwhile here in Alberta.........

 

Bell: Kenney, COVID and no apology for a mask-free Stampede | Calgary Sun

 

I wish Kenny would just be brave enough to come out of the closet. I mean look at this picture. 

 

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Just now, Jimmy McGill said:

 

I wish Kenny would just be brave enough to come out of the closet. I mean look at this picture. 

 

He would completely alienate his base though

 

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Just now, MikeBossy said:

He would completely alienate his base though

 

or maybe change a few minds. Its well known, its too bad he doesn't have the spine to do it imo. 

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11 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

 

I wish Kenny would just be brave enough to come out of the closet. I mean look at this picture. 

 

No wonder he, and this guy share a special relationship.

 

Harper cowboy.jpg

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